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Norman Abbott, Veteran Sitcom Director, Dies at 93

Norman Abbott, Veteran Sitcom Director, Dies at 93
Norman Abbott, the nephew of comedian Bud Abbott who directed numerous 1960s and ’70s sitcoms such as “Get Smart” and “The Brady Bunch,” died July 9 in Valencia, Calif. at the age of 93.

Born in New York, Norman Abbott was raised by his mother and his uncle, Bud Abbott, the straight man of the legendary comedy team of Abbott and Costello, as well as his aunt Florence Abbott and uncle Harry Abbott of Barnum & Bailey.

Norman Abbott served in World War II in the original Navy Seals unit, and was encouraged by his uncle to join the family business. He started his five decade career in show business as a radio announcer on “The Colgate Family Hour” and as stage manager on the “I Love Lucy Show.”

He went on to direct some of television’s most loved sitcoms, including “The Jack Benny Show,” for which he won an Emmy Award in 1965. He directed numerous episodes of “Leave It To Beaver
See full article at Variety - TV News »

Slackery News Tidbits, February 3

Here's the latest Austin movie news. If you make it through the whole list, there's a little reward at the end.

According to MTV (and Justin Bieber, oddly enough), Mike Judge's latest project is a return to TV and in fact to the MTV characters that launched his career in animation and filmmaking. That's right, Beavis and Butthead are back. What are you doing Friday night? Don't you want to celebrate the joys of videotape? Of course you do, so head to Rio Rita Cafe for the opening of the "Rewind This! The Art of VHS" exhibit. The exhibit runs through February and includes paintings, illustrations, photos, poster art and sculpture you can enjoy ... and even buy. You can also purchase t-shirts and other apparel proclaiming your VHS love. This is a fundraiser for the locally made film-in-progress Rewind This!, a documentary about VHS and the people who still watch,
See full article at Slackerwood »

Kathryn Grayson obituary

Singer and Hollywood star best known for her roles in MGM musicals of the 1940s and 50s

When coloratura soprano Kathryn Grayson, who has died aged 88, sang five songs, including an aria from La Traviata, in MGM's all-star patriotic parade, Thousands Cheer (1943), she began her 10-year reign as the prima donna of Hollywood. With her china-doll features, little turned-up nose and patrician manner, Grayson raised the tone of more than a dozen musicals. Although opera managers did not beat a path to her door, her clear, slightly shrill, small voice carried well on film in popular classics and operatic scenes.

Her classical training led her not to the opera house, but to the radio, in particular The Eddie Cantor Show, on which she was discovered by an MGM talent scout at the age of 18 in 1940. In the same year, she married the minor film actor John Shelton.

In her first film,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

Kathryn Grayson Dies at 88

Kathryn Grayson, the lilting soprano who starred in the classic MGM musicals "Show Boat," "Kiss Me Kate" and "Anchors Aweigh," died Wednesday at her Los Angeles home. She turned 88 last week.Grayson's longtime companion and secretary, Sally Sherman, said Thursday that the actress died of natural causes.Grayson also was professionally linked with Howard Keel, with whom she co-starred in three movies. With him, Grayson sang and acted as the riverboat belle Magnolia in "Show Boat" (1951); as a Parisian dress shop owner in "Lovely to Look At" (1952) -- in which she sang Jerome Kern's "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" -- and as a high-strung actress in "Kiss Me Kate" (1953). Later in their careers, Grayson and Keel performed together in nightclubs -- she was a coloratura soprano, he was a baritone -- and toured in summer stock.Born as Zelma Kathryn Elisabeth Hedrick on Feb. 9, 1922, in Winston-Salem, N.C., she
See full article at Backstage »

Kathryn Grayson dies at 88

Kathryn Grayson dies at 88
Kathryn Grayson, the lilting soprano who starred in the classic MGM musicals "Show Boat," "Kiss Me Kate" and "Anchors Aweigh," died Wednesday at her Los Angeles home. She turned 88 last week.

Grayson's longtime companion and secretary, Sally Sherman, said Thursday that the actress died of natural causes.

Grayson also was professionally linked with Howard Keel, with whom she co-starred in three movies. With him, Grayson sang and acted as the riverboat belle Magnolia in "Show Boat" (1951); as a Parisian dress shop owner in "Lovely to Look At" (1952) -- in which she sang Jerome Kern's "Smoke Gets in Your Eyes" -- and as a high-strung actress in "Kiss Me Kate" (1953).

Later in their careers, Grayson and Keel performed together in nightclubs -- she was a coloratura soprano, he was a baritone -- and toured in summer stock.

Born as Zelma Kathryn Elisabeth Hedrick on Feb. 9, 1922, in Winston-Salem, N.C., she
See full article at The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News »

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