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Mr. Blabbermouth! (1942)

Approved  |   |  Short  |  8 August 1942 (USA)
5.8
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Ratings: 5.8/10 from 195 users  
Reviews: 6 user

Following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, America was rife with rumors about the size of Japan's armed forces and how well-equipped they were to wage war against the U.S. Using animation, ... See full summary »

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(newspaper editorial), (screenplay)
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Title: Mr. Blabbermouth! (1942)

Mr. Blabbermouth! (1942) on IMDb 5.8/10

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Nominated for 1 Oscar. See more awards »
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
John Nesbitt ...
Narrator (voice)
Kai-Shek Chiang ...
Himself (archive footage)
...
Himself (archive footage)
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Storyline

Following Japan's attack on Pearl Harbor, America was rife with rumors about the size of Japan's armed forces and how well-equipped they were to wage war against the U.S. Using animation, the first part of this film dispels these rumors by showing that the U.S. had more raw materials and more fighting ships. The narrator also cautions moviegoers against spreading rumors (which are often initiated by enemy infiltrators to create fear and dissention) and believing everything they read in the newspapers. Just because "they say" something, that doesn't make it true. Written by David Glagovsky <dglagovsky@prodigy.net>

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Genres:

Short

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

8 August 1942 (USA)  »

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Technical Specs

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Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The following public service announcement is shown at the end of the film (following the "The End" title card), with a statue of a soldier surrounded by various battle scenes: "America needs your money. Buy War Bonds and Stamps at this theater." See more »

Crazy Credits

Narrator Nesbitt identifies Hitler and Chaing Kai-Shek. See more »

Connections

Edited from Coffins on Wheels (1941) See more »

Soundtracks

Deutschland, Deutschland Über Alles
Performed by orchestra
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User Reviews

 
Wartime propaganda film exposes the Mr.-Know-It-Alls spreading false rumors...
10 January 2009 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

This short subject is typical of the wartime propaganda films warning us against believing all the false rumors spread by the Mr. Blabbermouths in society who want to impress others with their know-it-all attitudes in spreading misinformation.

Since we all know people like Mr. Blabbermouth, it's easy to accept the idea that common sense must prevail against this sort of thing if we're to be good citizens. World War II was rife with sayings like: "Loose lips sink ships." Taking a stance against the Mr. Blabbermouths of the world was commonly accepted as the right thing to do.

Based on an editorial that appeared in The Los Angeles Daily News, it begins with a blackout during an air raid alarm and shows how the gossipers talked about it the next day, with some of them spreading false rumors implying that the Japanese were better equipped for war since they'd been training for it for years. We then see some amusing sequences of Mr. Blabbermouth spreading his own lies and finally getting his comeuppance from the neighborhood barber who knows how to shut him up.

Along the way, the narrator points out how much better equipped the United States was than Japan in terms of military preparations to fight back against the attack with a wealth of aluminum and steel.

Amusing and timely, it's done with a sense of humor but teaches a good lesson.


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