The Magnificent Ambersons
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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

19 items from 2017


Othello

17 October 2017 11:09 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Othello

Blu-ray

Criterion

1952 / Black and White / 1:33 / Street Date October 10, 2017

Starring Orson Welles, Suzanne Cloutier, Micheál MacLiammóir

Cinematography by G.R. Aldo, Anchise Brizzi, George Fanto, Alberto Fusi, Oberdan Troiani

Written by William Shakespeare (Adapted by Orson Welles)

Edited by Jenö Csepreghy, Renzo Lucidi, William Morton, Jean Sacha

Produced by Orson Welles, Julien Derode

Directed by Orson Welles

Shakespeare didn’t invent Orson Welles but he did define him; it can be said that if any one director took arms against the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune, it was the man behind Citizen Kane, Touch of Evil and Chimes at Midnight. The 1952 production of Othello is exhibit A.

Filmed over a turbulent three year period in and around Morocco, Venice and Rome, Welles was bedeviled by an ever-changing cast and crew resulting in reshoots by five different cinematographers and assembled by four different editors. The sound recording was a joke. »

- Charlie Largent

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Martin Scorsese on Rotten Tomatoes, Box Office Obsession and Why 'Mother!' Was Misjudged (Guest Column)

10 October 2017 6:00 AM, PDT | The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News | See recent The Hollywood Reporter - Movie News news »

I have serious doubts that anyone misses the days when they were back in school and getting graded on their work. I could be wrong, but I don't think so.

When I graduated from school, I thought to myself, "Great, no more grades!" That was before my first sneak preview. As any filmmaker can tell you, previews are brutal experiences. Sometimes, they're truly damaging, as in the case of Rko's infamous Pomona preview of Orson WellesThe Magnificent Ambersons. Studio executives used negative audience reactions from that screening as a rationale for butchering Welles' original cut of a picture that is »

- Martin Scorsese

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Orson Welles’s The Stranger and John Farrow’s The Sea Chase: Jim Hemphill’s Home Video

5 September 2017 12:51 PM, PDT | Filmmaker Magazine - Blog | See recent Filmmaker Magazine news »

I’ve always been mystified by the relative lack of attention and acclaim Orson Welles’ 1946 thriller The Stranger has received compared with the director’s better known efforts, since on just about every level it’s top-tier Welles. Perhaps Welles’ own denigration of the picture, which he saw as an impersonal assignment designed to restore his box-office credibility after The Magnificent Ambersons, is to blame. It’s a genre film, sure, but then so is Touch of Evil, which many Welles enthusiasts (myself included) consider to be every bit as important in the director’s oeuvre as Citizen Kane. The Stranger is actually a […] »

- Jim Hemphill

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Film Feature: HollywoodChicago.com Remembers Jerry Lewis

30 August 2017 6:59 PM, PDT | HollywoodChicago.com | See recent HollywoodChicago.com news »

Chicago – Jerry Lewis had a long and winding life, dying last week at the age of 91. Through that life he had many show business lives – including the inevitable addictions – surviving all of the them with his signature comic style. He also was featured in over 70 films, and HollywoodChicago.com remembers three of them.

Jerry Lewis in Chicago in 1996

Photo credit: Joe Arce of Starstruck Foto for HollywoodChicago.com

When the gawky 19 year-old Lewis met the suave singer Dean Martin in 1946, little did they know that they would become the most popular act in America for several years, and make 16 films together between 1949 through 1956. Their box office draw was white-hot, so much so that neither of them could keep up with the blur of what happened to them. “Martin & Lewis” eventually broke up at the height of their fame in 1956, during which Martin famously said, “Jer, when I look at you, »

- adam@hollywoodchicago.com (Adam Fendelman)

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The Furniture: The Night of the Hunter's American Expressionism

7 August 2017 9:15 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture," by Daniel Walber, is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

Charles Laughton’s The Night of the Hunter is an American classic. But it is also a clear descendant of a movement from across the Atlantic: German Expressionism. This comes through most clearly in the breathtaking work of cinematographer Stanley Cortez (The Magnificent Ambersons).

Yet while The Night of the Hunter’s visual language is clearly indebted to the German films of the 1920s, its sets are far cry from the angular nightmares of The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari and its siblings. Instead, the work of art director Hilyard M. Brown and set decorator Alfred E. Spencer is grounded in iconic American architecture. Through the intimate collaboration of production design and cinematographer, an Expressionist battle between good and evil unfolds through the aesthetic material of American life. »

- Daniel Walber

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The Furniture: The Magnificent Amberson Mansion

10 July 2017 7:30 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture" is our weekly series on Production Design. You can click on the images to see them in magnified detail.

by Daniel Walber 

Much has been written about the making of The Magnificent Ambersons, the conflict between Orson Welles and Rko, Robert Wise’s studio-mandated shorter version, Bernard Herrmann’s refusal of credit, and the loss of much of the original footage. It’s a fascinating story.

However, this column isn’t about that. There remains plenty to celebrate in the version that was released to theaters, 75 years ago today. At the top of that list is the Amberson mansion, a triumph of design that should stand next to Citizen Kane’s Xanadu. It’s like a Victorian ancestor to the great palace of Charles Foster Kane, a previous iteration of wealth’s excesses. But the story of The Magnificent Ambersons is not about a meteoric rise in fortune, »

- Daniel Walber

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"Peyton Place" 60th Anniversary Screening, July 12, L.A.

9 July 2017 12:52 PM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Todd Garbarini

Mark Robson’s 1957 film Peyton Place celebrates its 60th anniversary with a special screening at the Royal Theatre in Los Angeles. The film, which runs 157 minutes, stars Lana Turner, Lee Philips, Lloyd Nolan, Arthur Kennedy, Russ Tamblyn, Terry More, and Hope Lange.

Please Note: Actress Terry Moore is currently scheduled to appear at the screening as part of a Q & A regarding the film and her career.

From the press release:

Part of our Anniversary Classics series. For details, visit: laemmle.com/ac.

Peyton Place (1957)

60th Anniversary Screening

Wednesday, July 12, at 7:00 Pm at the Royal Theatre

Q & A with Co-Star Terry Moore

Laemmle Theatres and the Anniversary Classics Series present a 60th anniversary screening of 'Peyton Place,' the smash hit movie version of Grace Metalious’s best-selling novel. The film earned nine top Academy Award nominations, including Best Picture, Best Director, and Best Adapted Screenplay. »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Good Bad Man Cortez: Final Interview Segment with Biographer of The Great Hollywood Heel

7 July 2017 5:39 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

'The Magnificent Ambersons': Directed by Orson Welles, and starring Tim Holt (pictured), Dolores Costello (in the background), Joseph Cotten, Anne Baxter, and Agnes Moorehead, this Academy Award-nominated adaptation of Booth Tarkington's novel earned Ricardo Cortez's brother Stanley Cortez an Academy Award nomination for Best Cinematography, Black-and-White. He lost to Joseph Ruttenberg for William Wyler's blockbuster 'Mrs. Miniver.' Two years later, Cortez – along with Lee Garmes – would win Oscar statuettes for their evocative black-and-white work on John Cromwell's homefront drama 'Since You Went Away,' starring Ricardo Cortez's 'Torch Singer' leading lady, Claudette Colbert. In all, Stanley Cortez would receive cinematography credit in more than 80 films, ranging from B fare such as 'The Lady in the Morgue' and the 1940 'Margie' to Fritz Lang's 'Secret Beyond the Door,' Charles Laughton's 'The Night of the Hunter,' and Nunnally Johnson's 'The Three Faces »

- Andre Soares

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After Valentino and Before Bogart There Was Cortez: 'The Magnificent Heel' and the Movies' Original Sam Spade

6 July 2017 10:44 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Ricardo Cortez biography 'The Magnificent Heel: The Life and Films of Ricardo Cortez' – Paramount's 'Latin Lover' threat to a recalcitrant Rudolph Valentino, and a sly, seductive Sam Spade in the original film adaptation of Dashiell Hammett's 'The Maltese Falcon.' 'The Magnificent Heel: The Life and Films of Ricardo Cortez': Author Dan Van Neste remembers the silent era's 'Latin Lover' & the star of the original 'The Maltese Falcon' At odds with Famous Players-Lasky after the release of the 1922 critical and box office misfire The Young Rajah, Rudolph Valentino demands a fatter weekly paycheck and more control over his movie projects. The studio – a few years later to be reorganized under the name of its distribution arm, Paramount – balks. Valentino goes on a “one-man strike.” In 42nd Street-style, unknown 22-year-old Valentino look-alike contest winner Jacob Krantz of Manhattan steps in, shortly afterwards to become known worldwide as Latin Lover Ricardo Cortez of »

- Andre Soares

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Book Review: "Robert Wise: The Motion Pictures" By Joe Jordan

14 June 2017 6:31 AM, PDT | Cinemaretro.com | See recent CinemaRetro news »

By Dean Brierly 

For a film director with such an iconic resume, there’s a surprising scarcity of scholarly books devoted to Robert Wise, the man who directed such classics as  "West Side Story" (1961), "The Haunting" (1963), “The Sound of Music” (1965), “The Curse of the Cat People” (1944), “The Day the Earth Stood Still” (1951), “The Sand Pebbles” (1966) and many other critical and commercial successes. To say nothing of his stature as the man who edited “Citizen Kane” (1941) and “The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942) before taking up decades-long residence in the director’s chair.

Wise brought a self-effacing approach to directing, one that never drew attention to itself. He may have had the most “invisible” style of all the major directors from Hollywood’s Golden Era, which no doubt helps explain why he never had the auteur imprimatur conferred upon him by French critics who swooned over Welles’ baroque visuals, Douglas Sirk’s melodramatic excess, »

- nospam@example.com (Cinema Retro)

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Orson Welles Documentary in the Works at Netflix With ’20 Feet From Stardom’ Director

15 May 2017 11:22 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Netflix is developing a documentary on Orson Welles, directed by “20 Feet From Stardom” filmmaker Morgan Neville.

It’s the second Welles project that’s in the works at the streaming company. Monday’s announcement of the untitled documentary comes two months after the service acquired global rights to Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind,” to finance the completion of the director’s final film. The two pics will be released simultaneously next year.

Neville won the 2014 Academy Award for best feature documentary for “20 Feet From Stardom,” which focused on backup singers. His Welles documentary is being produced by Tremolo Productions, and executive produced by Frank Marshall and Filip Jan Rymsza.

Neville’s documentary will focus on Welles’ relationship with Hollywood, particularly on “The Other Side of the Wind.”

“‘The Other Side of the Wind’ has long been a ghostly legend in cinema history, but the story behind it is equally fascinating, »

- Dave McNary

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Wes Anderson’s Style: Watch 10 Iconic Movies That Influenced Him

26 April 2017 2:23 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Editor’s Note: This article is presented in partnership with FilmStruck. Developed and managed by Turner Classic Movies (TCM) in collaboration with the Criterion Collection, FilmStruck features the largest streaming library of contemporary and classic arthouse, indie, foreign and cult films as well as extensive bonus content, filmmaker interviews and rare footage. Learn more here.

Wes Anderson has one of the most original voices of any filmmaker working today, but his movies are full of clues as to which directors have influenced him the most. From Orson Welles to François Truffaut to Federico Fellini, some of the most iconic filmmakers in the history of cinema have had a hand in inspiring Anderson’s distinctive style. Here are 10 films that had a lasting impact on the indie auteur.

The Magnificent Ambersons” (1942)

Orson Welles’ period drama about a wealthy family that loses its entire fortune at the turn of the 20th century »

- Graham Winfrey

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The Seven Deadly Sins On Screen

25 April 2017 11:01 AM, PDT | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

A new video looks beyond Fincher at the Evil Men Do

Sin, as defined by most major religions and moral institutions, is as old as man. It is inherent to our nature, because ultimately sin is self-serving, and at the end of the day we are all self-serving creatures. Wrath, pride, sloth, lust, envy, gluttony, greed — as opposed to the Ten Commandments of Christianity which include distinct acts like adultery and murder, the seven deadly sins are things of which most all of us are guilty of multiple times over. We’ve all committed them, even on a minor scale. Ever think someone has a nicer car than you? Envy. Ever gotten a touch of road rage? Wrath. Ever hit the snooze button more than once? Sloth.

These are petty examples to be sure, but they illustrate how commonplace the seven deadly sins are in our daily lives, and thus they prove why the seven deadly sins »

- H. Perry Horton

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Rushes. Michael Ballhaus, Kathryn Bigelow's "Detroit," Tony Scott Adapts Henry James

12 April 2017 10:19 AM, PDT | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Get in touch to send in cinephile news and discoveriesNEWSMichael Ballhaus (second from right) on the set of Martin Scorsese's The DepartedMichael Ballhaus, the great German cinematographer whose innovative work connects Rainer Werner Fassbinder to Martin Scorsese, has died at the age of 81.Goodness, could it be true, The Lost City of Z director James Gray and Brad Pitt finally teaming up? And for a sci-fi? Indeed: the film, titled Ad Astra, will be shooting this summer.Recommended VIEWINGKathryn Bigelow has been attached to several projects following the success and controversy of Zero Dark Thirty, and now we have a first look at her next feature, Detroit, set during 1967 riots in the city. It will be in cinemas this summer.The teaser trailer for Joachim Trier's Thelma, possibly headed to premiere at the Cannes Film Festival. We spoke to Trier about his English language debut, Louder Than Bombs, »

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A Game of Death (1945)| Blu-ray Review

28 March 2017 8:00 AM, PDT | ioncinema | See recent ioncinema news »

Making his move from editor (Citizen Kane, The Devil and Daniel Webster, and The Magnificent Ambersons) to director in the early 1940s, Robert Wise wasted little time jumping into a variety of arguably B-grade pictures (like the Val Lewton sequel The Curse of the Cat People, the Guy de Maupassant adaptation Mademoiselle Fifi, and back again to Lewton for the marvelous Robert Louis Stevenson tale The Body Snatchers).

Continue reading »

- Nicholas Bell

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From Paris to Netflix: The Long, Strange Journey of Orson Welles’ Last Movie, ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

20 March 2017 7:00 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

When Netflix announced March 14 it would be financing and distributing a finished cut of Orson Welles’ “The Other Side of the Wind,” the company opened a new chapter in one of the wildest, most frustrating sagas of film lore.

The legendary director shot his final film between 1970 and 1976, but a series of financial setbacks kept him from realizing his vision before his death in 1985. In the 32 years since, surviving members of the production had attempted to complete the project, but for legal reasons were unable to procure the more than 1,000 reels of negatives from a vault in Paris until the streaming giant stepped in this week.

The negatives are now safely in Los Angeles, in the hands of the team that will edit the film, according to a March 14 note from producer Filip Jan Rymsza. A short video released the next day on Yahoo details the process of shipping the reels. »

- Andrew Lapin

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Netflix Will Complete Orson Welles’ Last Film ‘The Other Side of the Wind’

14 March 2017 3:30 PM, PDT | Slash Film | See recent Slash Film news »

Filmmaker Orson Welles has left behind two holy grails for film aficionados to chase. One is the footage cut from his original version of The Magnificent Ambersons, which as far as anyone can tell, doesn’t exist anymore. The other is The Other Side of the Wind, which is the long-uncompleted final film from Welles. Frank […]

The post Netflix Will Complete Orson Welles’ Last Film ‘The Other Side of the Wind’ appeared first on /Film. »

- Peter Sciretta

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The Forgotten: Erik Charell's "The Congress Dances" (1931) and "Caravan" (1934)

3 March 2017 3:05 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Erik Charell. His credits include script contributions to the Hope-Crosby comedy Road to Morocco and the Tony Martin musical Casbah. To learn this after seeing his only two features as director, The Congress Dances (1931) and Caravan (1934), is like discovering there was a guy called Orson Welles who made Citizen Kane and The Magnificent Ambersons and spent the rest of his career writing gags for Abbott & Costello.Perhaps Charell wasn't an artist of quite Welles' status. But he'd made a big name for himself in operetta, and both his films are in this mode, though the operetta-film is the genre that time forgot. As out-of-vogue as musicals are, despite anything Damien Chazelle can prove to the contrary, they are the height of fashion compared to actual filmed operettas.The Congress Dances is set in Vienna as pre-wwi world leaders meet and get distracted by romance, except Conrad Veidt as master diplomat »

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Framing Wes Anderson’s Memories

17 January 2017 9:43 AM, PST | FilmSchoolRejects.com | See recent FilmSchoolRejects news »

The frames-within-frames Wes Anderson uses in his work show his filmography’s obsession with memory.The Grand Budapest Hotel (Anderson, 2014).

The artist Joseph Cornell took glass-fronted boxes and placed things such as birds, springs, ice cubes, and balls inside them, turning these everyday and otherwise benign objects into microcosms for something bigger than any of us can ever be. These boxes were referred to as “shadow boxes”, “memory boxes” and “poetic theaters,” and with each box the viewer is given an invitation to enter a new world. This world is not unknown to the individual viewer, but instead a collective and shared world in which memories exist. As the artist’s website states: “using things we can see, Cornell made boxes about things we cannot see: ideas, memories, fantasies, and dreams.” The boxes, both tragic and beautiful, present an artist trying as hard as they can to turn something intangible, something »

- Sinéad McCausland

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

19 items from 2017


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