The Magnificent Ambersons
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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


Neal Doesn't Stand Still as Earth Stops, Fascism Rises: Oscar Winner Who Suffered Massive Stroke Is TCM's Star

16 August 2015 4:55 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Patricia Neal ca. 1950. Patricia Neal movies: 'The Day the Earth Stood Still,' 'A Face in the Crowd' Back in 1949, few would have predicted that Gary Cooper's leading lady in King Vidor's The Fountainhead would go on to win a Best Actress Academy Award 15 years later. Patricia Neal was one of those performers – e.g., Jean Arthur, Anne Bancroft – whose film career didn't start out all that well, but who, by way of Broadway, managed to both revive and magnify their Hollywood stardom. As part of its “Summer Under the Stars” series, Turner Classic Movies is dedicating Sunday, Aug. 16, '15, to Patricia Neal. This evening, TCM is showing three of her best-known films, in addition to one TCM premiere and an unusual latter-day entry. 'The Day the Earth Stood Still' Robert Wise was hardly a genre director. A former editor (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons »

- Andre Soares

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Daily | Welles, Doctorow, Ai Weiwei

22 July 2015 5:05 AM, PDT | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

Whatever you think of the results of the poll of critics the BBC's conducted to come up with its list of the "100 greatest American films," we can surely all agree that we're glad to have the notes on the top 25: Glenn Kenny, for example, on #1, Orson Welles's Citizen Kane, Stephanie Zacharek on #2, Francis Ford Coppola's The Godfather, Ali Arikan on #4, Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey, Bilge Ebiri on #6, F.W. Murnau's Sunrise, Molly Haskell on #11, Welles's The Magnificent Ambersons, Jonathan Rosenbaum on #18, Charles Chaplin's City Lights and so on. Also today: Ai Weiwei gets his passport back; remembering E.L. Doctorow—and more. » - David Hudson »

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BBC Culture curates 100 best American films, courtesy of 62 international film critics

22 July 2015 5:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

BBC Culture has this week unveiled a new list of the top 100 American films, as voted for by a pool of international film critics from across the globe. The format of the poll was that any film that would make the list had to have recieved funding from a Us source, and the directors of the films did not need to be from the USA, nor did the films voted for need to be filmed in the Us.

Critics were asked to submit their top 10 lists, which would try to find the top 100 American films that while “not necessarily the most important, but the greatest on an emotional level”. The list, as you may have guessed, is very different to the lists curated by say the BFI or AFI over the years, so there are certainly a few surprises on here, with Steve McQueen’s 12 Years A Slave (2013), Terrence Malick »

- Scott J. Davis

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Scratching our heads at the BBC's top 100 American Movies of All-Time

21 July 2015 5:07 PM, PDT | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

First off, let's make one thing clear.  We're not scratching our heads at Spike Lee's "Do The Right Thing" making the BBC's 100 greatest American films.  That movie, of which an image accompanies this post, not only made the list, but ranked appropriately at no. 25.  It's the rest of the selections that have us scratching and, yes, shaking our heads in disbelief. A wonderful page view driver, these sorts of lists make great fodder for passionate movie fans no matter what their age or part of the world they hail from.  There is nothing more entertaining than watching two critics from opposite ends of the globe try to debate whether "The Dark Knight" should have been nominated for best picture or make a list like this.  Even in this age of short form content where Vines, Shapchats and Instagram videos have captured viewers attention, movies will continue to inspire because »

- Gregory Ellwood

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'Citizen Kane' Tops BBC's List of "100 Greatest American Films", Where Does Your Favorite Landc

21 July 2015 11:46 AM, PDT | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Leave it to the Brits to compile a list of the best American films of all-time. BBC Culture has published a list of what it calls "The 100 Greatest American Films", as selected by 62 international film critics in order to "get a global perspective on American film." As BBC Culture notes, the critics polled represent a combination of broadcasters, book authors and reviewers at various newspapers and magazines across the world. As for what makes an American filmc "Any movie that received funding from a U.S. source," BBC Culture's publication states, which is to say the terminology was quite loose, but the list contains a majority of the staples you'd expect to see. Citizen Kane -- what elsec -- comes in at #1, and in typical fashion The Godfather follows at #2. Vertigo, which in 2012 topped Sight & Sound's list of the greatest films of all-time, comes in at #3 on BBC Culture's list. »

- Jordan Benesh

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BBC Names 100 Greatest U.S. Films

21 July 2015 9:56 AM, PDT | Dark Horizons | See recent Dark Horizons news »

Every now and then a major publication or news organisation comes up with a top fifty or one hundred films of all time list - a list which always stirs up debate, discussion and often interesting arguments about the justifications of the list's inclusions, ordering and notable exclusions.

Today it's the turn of BBC Culture who consulted sixty-two international film critics including print reviews, bloggers, broadcasters and film academics to come up with what they consider the one-hundred greatest American films of all time. To qualify, the film had to be made by a U.S. studio or mostly funded by American money.

Usually when a list of this type is done it is by institutes or publications within the United States asking American critics their favourites. This time it's non-American critics born outside the culture what they think are the best representations of that culture. Specifically they were asked »

- Garth Franklin

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Magician: The Astonishing Life and Work of Orson Welles review – a heady ride

5 July 2015 12:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Chuck Workman’s documentary offers an excellent primer on the maestro’s career

“A magician is just an actor playing the part of a magician.” Released alongside a Welles retrospective at BFI Southbank (Touch of Evil returns to selected cinemas on 10 July), this watchable documentary provides an excellent primer on the maestro’s brilliantly chaotic career. Divided into biographical segments (The Boy Wonder, The Outsider, The Gypsy etc), Chuck Workman’s film intercuts archive interviews with clips of Welles’s work from stage, screen and radio. It’s a heady ride; from the national panic which greeted the War of the Worlds broadcast, through the “confidence of ignorance” of Citizen Kane (“I didn’t know what you couldn’t do”), to the butchering of The Magnificent Ambersons, and Welles’s subsequent status as an accidentally path-breaking indie film-maker. Clips from films in which he appears as a character (Christian McKay in Me and Orson Welles, »

- Mark Kermode, Observer film critic

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Watch: Sizzling Re-Release Trailer For Orson Welles' Noir Masterpiece 'Touch Of Evil'

12 June 2015 5:39 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

While the narrative these days around Orson Welles tends to focus on his unfinished films or the wacky work he did in the latter stages of his career, like editing pornos, it can't be overstated that he was an absolutely brilliant filmmaker. Of course, there's "Citizen Kane," but even the studio-mangled "The Magnificent Ambersons" shines in its truncated form, "The Stranger" is an underrrated gem, and then there's "Touch Of Evil." It's a flat out noir masterpiece and audiences in the U.K. are going to get to see it on the big screen once again this summer. Read More: Retrospective: The Directorial Films Of Orson Welles As with many of his films, Welles saw his original vision for "Touch Of Evil" manhandled by the studio. After submitting his rough cut to Universal, the studio hired Harry Keller to shoot additional material. After Welles saw this new cut, he issued »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Very Nsfw Scene From '70s Porn '3 A.M.' Edited By Orson Welles

8 June 2015 9:35 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Orson Welles' career and filmography is essentially split into two categories: the filmmaking master behind "Citizen Kane," "The Magnificent Ambersons," and "Touch Of Evil," and the washout who starred in commercials, and did various less than prestigious jobs for money. And a curio from that latter category has been unearthed. Read More: Retrospective: The Directorial Films Of Orson Welles In Josh Karp’s new book "Orson Welles's Last Movie: The Making of The Other Side of the Wind," the author brings up the previously not-well-known story of Orson Welles' brief job editing a lesbian sex scene in the 1975 porno "3 A.M." The movie was directed by Gary Graver (working under the pseudonym Robert McCallum), who was actually the cinematographer on Welles still unfinished "The Other Side Of The Wind" (for which there's a current crowd-sourcing campaign). Welles didn't have the money to pay the crew on 'Other Side, »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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David Reviews Robert Wise’s Star Trek: The Motion Picture

1 June 2015 7:00 AM, PDT | CriterionCast | See recent CriterionCast news »

Let’s get the obvious question out of the way: why in the world is Criterion Cast posting a review of Star Trek: The Motion Picture? The film was released in the late Seventies, no new version has been recently issued on either Blu-ray or in a new theatrical run, and while it’s not completely out of the realm of possibility for this site to take a look at mainstream big budget productions aimed at the mass audience, it’s also pretty obvious that St:tmp isn’t the sort of movie that fits all that comfortably alongside the foreign, independent and alternative cinematic expressions that typically draw our critical attention.

The reason I’m posting this review here is that I agreed to participate in the 2015 White Elephant Blogathon, a project organized by Philip Tatler in which he solicits nominations from a couple dozen movie bloggers for offbeat films »

- David Blakeslee

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The Conversation: Landon Palmer and Drew Morton Discuss ‘The Magnificent Ambersons’

23 May 2015 8:18 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Magnificent Ambersons

Landon’S Take: 

Orson Welles is celebrated as one of the foremost visionaries in the history of American filmmaking. He’s also renowned as the perennial artist against the system. While both of these factors make Welles perhaps the ideal auteur – someone satisfied with nothing less than a perfect articulation of his individual vision within the collaborative medium of filmmaking – it also presents some unique problems in examining works that were taken away from him.

The classically celebrated auteurs of studio era Hollywood (e.g., Hawks, Ford, Hitchcock) were known for creating individuated worldviews across their body of work either despite or even because of the strictures inherent in Classical Hollywood filmmaking. This was not Welles, who from his rise to infamy with the 1938 “War of the Worlds” broadcast to his first studio feature made a name by challenging the assumed utilities of a medium. Neither could »

- Drew Morton

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Kael Vs. Kane: Pauline Kael, Orson Welles and the Authorship of Citizen Kane

10 May 2015 11:59 AM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

Part I.

In 1963, Film Quarterly published an essay entitled “Circles and Squares.” It addressed the French auteur theory, introduced to America by The Village Voice’s Andrew Sarris. Auteurism holds that a film’s primary creator is its director; Sarris’s “Notes on the Auteur Theory” further distinguished auteurs as filmmakers with distinct, recurring styles. Challenging him was a California-based writer named Pauline Kael.

Kael attacked Sarris’s obsession with trivial links between filmmaker’s movies, whether repeated shots or thematic preoccupations. This led critics to overpraise directors’ lesser films, as when Jacques Rivette declared Howard HawksMonkey Business a masterpiece. “It is an insult to an artist to praise his bad work along with his good; it indicates that you are incapable of judging either,” Kael wrote.

She criticized auteurist preoccupation with Hawks and Alfred Hitchcock, claiming critics “work embarrassingly hard trying to give some semblance of intellectual respectability to mindless, »

- Christopher Saunders

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'The Third Man' Gets Special Release for Orson Welles's 100th Birthday

6 May 2015 3:10 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Happy 100th birthday to Orson Welles, who is looking better than ever thanks to a major new restoration. Welles was born May 6, 1915, and even though he passed away in 1985, he got himself trending on his birthday in 2015. That's when you know you're a #legend.

In honor of Welles' 100th b-day, Rialto Pictures is releasing "The Third Man" in a major 4K restoration. It's the first-ever for the 1949 Carol Reed classic -- considered by many to be one of the greatest movies of all time -- which stars Orson Welles as Harry Lime and Joseph Cotten as Holly Martins. According to a media release, the new restoration will have its world premiere this month in the "Cannes Classics" section of the Cannes Film Festival, with U.S. openings at New York's Film Forum on June 26 (2-week run) and L.A.'s Nuart on July 3. Showings in San Francisco, Washington, DC, Seattle, »

- Gina Carbone

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Coming Soon to "Best Shot"

19 April 2015 11:00 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Why not join the merriest movie club? You only have to 1) watch the movie, 2) take a screengrab of your favorite image and 3) post it somewhere online saying why you chose it. It's that easy! 

Here's what's coming right up...

Wed, April 22nd 9 To 5 (1981)

With the new series Grace and Frankie premiering in May on Netflix, let's revisit the first comic pairing of the legendary Jane Fonda and Lily Tomlin, this time as an Unofficial Office Manager and Mousy New Secretary who have the world's worst boss. Also starring Dolly Parton and one of the great movie theme songs. The one thing we've never really considered about this movie is how it looks. So let's look. Invite a friend to play because who doesn't love this movie?

[Amazon Instant | Netflix Instant | iTunes] 

Wed, April 29th Bright Star (2009)

We're joining Anne Marie's "Women's Pictures" series for a Jane Campion (she's the topic this month). Drown in the »

- NATHANIEL R

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Movies This Week: April 3-9, 2015

3 April 2015 12:00 PM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

 

This weekend, the Austin Film Society continues with "Perfect Criminals: The 70's French Noir Connection" series, and Friday night has a killer (no pun intended) double feature on tap. Alain Delon stars in Jean-Pierre Melville's 1967 gangster film Le Samourai (for a one-off screening) paired with Le Cercle Rouge, another Melville classic from 1970 that also stars Delon. The latter film will screen again on Monday night and both are presented in 35mm at the Marchesa. Amanda Wilder's Approaching The Elephant is screening on Tuesday for Doc Nights and David Lynch's Blue Velvet screens in 35mm on Wednesday night as part of the "Jewels In The Wasteland" series, although this edition will only include a video introduction from Richard Linklater due to an unexpected conflict. Essential Cinema on Thursday night will feature Elia Kazan's A Streetcar Named Desire, the 1951 film based on the Tennessee Williams play that features »

- Matt Shiverdecker

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Will Ferrell And Kristen Wiig Cancel Plans For Lifetime Movie 'A Deadly Adoption'

3 April 2015 6:23 AM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

So, is this like the comedy version of the presumably destroyed footage of "The Magnificent Ambersons?" If you were excited about the Will Ferrell and Kirsten Wiig starring Lifetime movie "A Deadly Adoption," we have some bad news for you: it's not happening. To recap: news dropped on April 1st —which was underscored by an assertion that this wasn't an April Fool's day joke— that Ferrell and Wiig had secretly completed a campy dramatic thriller of the sort Lifetime is known for. Directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg (“Escape From Polygamy,” “Love at the Christmas Table,” “Toddlers and Tiaras: Where Are They Now?”), penned by Andrew Steele ("Spoils Of Babylon"), and co-starring Jessica Lowndes ("90210"), the story concerns a couple who look after a young, pregnant woman with plans to adopt her child, only for things to go wrong. The project was being kept top secret with plans for the movie to air in the. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Will Ferrell And Kristen Wiig Cancel Plans For Lifetime Movie 'A Deadly Adoption'

3 April 2015 6:23 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

So, is this like the comedy version of the presumably destroyed footage of "The Magnificent Ambersons?" If you were excited about the Will Ferrell and Kirsten Wiig starring Lifetime movie "A Deadly Adoption," we have some bad news for you: it's not happening. To recap: news dropped on April 1st —which was underscored by an assertion that this wasn't an April Fool's day joke— that Ferrell and Wiig had secretly completed a campy dramatic thriller of the sort Lifetime is known for. Directed by Rachel Lee Goldenberg (“Escape From Polygamy,” “Love at the Christmas Table,” “Toddlers and Tiaras: Where Are They Now?”), penned by Andrew Steele ("Spoils Of Babylon"), and co-starring Jessica Lowndes ("90210"), the story concerns a couple who look after a young, pregnant woman with plans to adopt her child, only for things to go wrong. The project was being kept top secret with plans for the movie to air in the. »

- Kevin Jagernauth

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Watch: Video Essay Explores Orson Welles' 'F For Fake' & Narrative Structure

2 April 2015 2:45 PM, PDT | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Most cineastes associate Orson Welles with landmark motion pictures like “The Magnificent Ambersons,” “Touch of Evil,” and the granddaddy of them all, “Citizen Kane.” But his 1974 oddity, “F for Fake” — a nifty riff on the notion of deceit and what exactly “artistic license” really means, and also the last picture he would ever direct — is worth seeking out for those who wish to dig into the more obscure corners of the legendary filmmaker’s body of work. A loosely structured, free-form narrative hoax, one that Roger Ebert famously called “fun and engaging [but] minor,” “F for Fake” cannot attest to the almost-unanimous acclaim of Welles’ earlier pictures, but, oddly enough, it plays well today. The film has a prankish, fearless spirit that is as ahead of its time, in its own way, as the films of Jean-Luc Godard (an amusing comparison, if for no other reason than Welles had some not-very-nice »

- Nicholas Laskin

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New on Video: ‘The Lady from Shanghai’

24 March 2015 6:53 PM, PDT | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Lady from Shanghai

Written and directed by Orson Welles

USA, 1947

The Lady from Shanghai (1947) didn’t come easily for Orson Welles. No film ever really did after his breakthrough, the great Citizen Kane (1941), the movie that put him on the map and in the crosshairs of the Hollywood establishment. They wanted little to do with this iconoclastic hotshot from New York, and for the rest of his days, Welles struggled to achieve an autonomous artistic vision. That so many astonishing films came out of this struggle, like The Lady from Shanghai, surely says something about his cinematic gift, an inherent talent that could not be restrained or denied.

It took considerable wheeling and dealing for Welles to convince Harry Cohn to back the film. Welles had three features on his directorial résumé, and though Citizen Kane and The Magnificent Ambersons (1942) were not financially successful, his third film, The Stranger (1946), was. »

- Jeremy Carr

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Wright Was Earliest Surviving Best Supporting Actress Oscar Winner

15 March 2015 12:05 AM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Teresa Wright: Later years (See preceding post: "Teresa Wright: From Marlon Brando to Matt Damon.") Teresa Wright and Robert Anderson were divorced in 1978. They would remain friends in the ensuing years.[1] Wright spent most of the last decade of her life in Connecticut, making only sporadic public appearances. In 1998, she could be seen with her grandson, film producer Jonah Smith, at New York's Yankee Stadium, where she threw the ceremonial first pitch.[2] Wright also became involved in the Greater New York chapter of the Als Association. (The Pride of the Yankees subject, Lou Gehrig, died of Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis in 1941.) The week she turned 82 in October 2000, Wright attended the 20th anniversary celebration of Somewhere in Time, where she posed for pictures with Christopher Reeve and Jane Seymour. In March 2003, she was a guest at the 75th Academy Awards, in the segment showcasing Oscar-winning actors of the past. Two years later, »

- Andre Soares

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2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2005

1-20 of 25 items from 2015   « Prev | Next »


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