6.5/10
564
20 user 6 critic

Grand Central Murder (1942)

Passed | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | May 1942 (USA)
Classic whodunit mystery film about a gold-digging variety show actress who has many enemies and is found dead in her private railroad car at Grand Central Station in New York.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (based on the novel by)
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From $9.99 (SD) on Amazon Video

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
Mida King
...
Constance Furness
...
Sue Custer
...
Roger Furness
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Inspector Gunther
Connie Gilchrist ...
Pearl Delroy
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David V. Henderson
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'Turk' (as Horace McNally)
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Frankie Ciro
Betty Wells ...
'Baby' Delroy
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Paul Rinehart
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Ramon
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Arthur Doolin

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Storyline

A convict being escorted in for retrial escapes at Grand Central and threatens his old girlfriend on the phone. She flees for her new beau's private railcar at the same station. When she is then found murdered the cops round up a motley group of suspects including the escapee, several guys feeling sore at the way the gold-digging broad had treated them, some jealous dames, and a private eye already on the case. Inspector Gunther soon has a problem - enough evidence to fry all of them. Written by Jeremy Perkins <jwp@aber.ac.uk>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Screamingly funny! Screamingly thrilling!


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

May 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Asasinat in gara Grand Central  »

Box Office

Budget:

$250,000 (estimated)
 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Eddy Chandler (Plainclothes Policeman), Harry Strang (Policeman) and Robert Emmett O'Connor (Policeman) are in studio records for their roles, but were not seen in the movie. See more »

Quotes

Mida King, Stage Name of Beulah Toohey: Where were you raised? Didn't anyone ever tell you its bad luck to whistle in a dressing room?
Whistling Messenger: I'm sorry miss, I... I was raised in a cattle boat, where folks whistle when they feel like it, including the cows!
See more »

Connections

Edited from Broadway Melody of 1940 (1940) See more »

Soundtracks

Broadway's Still Broadway
(uncredited)
Music by Harry Revel
Lyrics by Ted Fetter
Sung by Connie Gilchrist in a burlesque show and danced by a chorus
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Who Killed Mida King?
13 December 2005 | by (Van Buren, Arkansas) – See all my reviews

Not a bad murder mystery with an interesting slant, gathering the usual suspects together in one place to flush out the guilty one takes place at the beginning of the film rather than at the end as would normally be the case. This enables the story to unfold in flashback fashion as told by each of the suspects. Van Heflin shines in one of his early roles. He seems a bit brash in places but otherwise is excellent. Patricia Dane in one of her few cinema appearances does well as the nasty gold digger who is murdered. Sam Levene made good money playing the dumb police inspector in several films of the period including two Thin Man's. So he knew his part by heart. And it's good to see veteran actor Millard Mitchell in one of his early roles.

When I first watched "Grand Central Murder," I reasoned it was taken from a play because that is how it runs. There are a few action scenes involving trains, especially at the end, but otherwise it could all have taken place on stage. This makes the movie very talkative and is a major weakness. I was surprised to see that the screenplay was adapted from a novel by Sue MacVeigh. So director S. Sylvan Simon must be to blame. The script is well-written with many witty lines. Not a bad way to spend 73 minutes.


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