IMDb > Gentleman Jim (1942)
Gentleman Jim
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Gentleman Jim (1942) More at IMDbPro »

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Gentleman Jim -- Trailer for this boxing story

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   1,915 votes »
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Down 9% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Vincent Lawrence (screen play) and
Horace McCoy (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Gentleman Jim on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
14 November 1942 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
The grandest story of the Naughty "Nineties" becomes the gayest picture of the Fighting "Forties!"
Plot:
As bareknuckled boxing enters the modern era, brash extrovert Jim Corbett uses new rules and dazzlingly innovative footwork to rise to the top of the top of the boxing world. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
NewsDesk:
User Reviews:
about the man who defeated the Great John L. See more (41 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Errol Flynn ... James J. Corbett

Alexis Smith ... Victoria Ware

Jack Carson ... Walter Lowrie

Alan Hale ... Pat Corbett
John Loder ... Carlton De Witt

William Frawley ... Billy Delaney
Minor Watson ... Buck Ware

Ward Bond ... John L. Sullivan
Madeleine Lebeau ... Anna Held (as Madeleine LeBeau)

Rhys Williams ... Harry Watson
Arthur Shields ... Father Burke
Dorothy Vaughan ... Ma Corbett
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Hooper Atchley ... (uncredited)
Clara Blandick ... Woman on Train (uncredited)
Monte Blue ... Gambler in "Lucky Guy" (uncredited)
Wade Boteler ... Policeman (uncredited)
Walter Byron ... Ringside Telegrapher (uncredited)
Georgia Caine ... Mrs. Geary (uncredited)
Johnny Calkins ... Boy (uncredited)
Davison Clark ... Auctioneer (uncredited)
Wallis Clark ... Judge Geary (uncredited)
Hal Craig ... Telegrapher (uncredited)
Joseph Crehan ... Duffy - Referee (uncredited)
Harry Crocker ... Charles Crocker (uncredited)
Wade Crosby ... Manager (uncredited)
William B. Davidson ... Donovan (uncredited)
William 'Wee Willie' Davis ... Flannagan (uncredited)
Jean Del Val ... Renaud (uncredited)
Joe Devlin ... Hogan (uncredited)
Dudley Dickerson ... Bellboy (uncredited)
Peggy Diggins ... Beautiful Actress (uncredited)
Lester Dorr ... Reporter (uncredited)
Robert Fiske ... Telegrapher (uncredited)

Pat Flaherty ... Harry Corbett (uncredited)
James Flavin ... George Corbett (uncredited)
Art Foster ... Jack Burke (uncredited)
Jack Gardner ... Usher (uncredited)
Mary Gordon ... Mrs. Casey (uncredited)
Frank Hagney ... Mug (uncredited)
Creighton Hale ... Championship Fight Spectator (uncredited)
Bert Hanlon ... Clerk (uncredited)
Carl Harbaugh ... Smith (uncredited)
Winifred Harris ... Woman at Opera (uncredited)
Lew Harvey ... Reporter (uncredited)
Herbert Heywood ... Man on Telephone (uncredited)

William Hopper ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Si Jenks ... Old Man (uncredited)
Fred Kelsey ... Sutro (uncredited)
Milton Kibbee ... (uncredited)
Joe King ... Col. McLane (uncredited)
Richard Kipling ... (uncredited)
Charles Lang ... (uncredited)
Ed Lewis ... Hoghead (uncredited)
George Lloyd ... Harrigan (uncredited)
Charles Marsh ... Station Master (uncredited)
John Maxwell ... Stockbroker (uncredited)
Eric Mayne ... Olympic Club Member (uncredited)
Frank Mayo ... Gov. Stanford (uncredited)

Mike Mazurki ... Jake Kilrain (uncredited)
Lon McCallister ... Page Boy (uncredited)
Larry McGrath ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Pat McKee ... Callahan - Ticket Taker (uncredited)
John Merkyl ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Howard M. Mitchell ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Frank Moran ... Spectator - Sullivan Fight (uncredited)
Pat Moriarity ... Spectator - Sullivan Fight (uncredited)
Jack Mower ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Wedgwood Nowell ... Broker (uncredited)
Henry O'Hara ... Colis Huntington (uncredited)
Pat O'Malley ... Detective (uncredited)
Emory Parnell ... Dennis Simmons - Doorman (uncredited)
Lee Phelps ... Detective (uncredited)
Marilyn Phillips ... Mary Corbett (uncredited)
Jack Roper ... Donaldson (uncredited)
Syd Saylor ... Hansom Cab Driver (uncredited)
George Sherwood ... Undetermined Role (uncredited)
Edwin Stanley ... Bank President McInnes (uncredited)
Freddie Steele ... Referee (uncredited)
Sammy Stein ... Joe Choynski (uncredited)
Dan Tobey ... Ring Announcer (uncredited)
Charlotte Treadway ... Matron (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan ... Stage Manager (uncredited)
Dick Wessel ... Referee (uncredited)
Leo White ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Charles C. Wilson ... Gurney (uncredited)
Joan Winfield ... Actress (uncredited)
Jack Wise ... Headwaiter (uncredited)
Victor Zimmerman ... Reporter (uncredited)
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Directed by
Raoul Walsh 
 
Writing credits
Vincent Lawrence (screen play) and
Horace McCoy (screen play)

James J. Corbett (based upon the life of)

Produced by
Robert Buckner .... producer
 
Original Music by
Heinz Roemheld (music) (as H. Roemheld)
 
Cinematography by
Sidney Hickox (director of photography) (as Sid Hickox)
 
Film Editing by
Jack Killifer (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Ted Smith 
 
Set Decoration by
Clarence Steensen (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Milo Anderson (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Frank Mattison .... production manager (uncredited)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Russell Saunders .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
C.A. Riggs .... sound
 
Stunts
Mushy Callahan .... fight choreographer (uncredited)
Yakima Canutt .... stunts (uncredited)
Paul Stader .... stunts (uncredited)
Buster Wiles .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
 
Editorial Department
Don Siegel .... montages
James Leicester .... montage (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
Ray Heindorf .... orchestral arrangements
Sam Perry .... composer: stock music (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Ed Cochrane .... technical advisor
Hugh Cummings .... dialogue director
Mushy Callahan .... trainer: Errol Flynn (uncredited)
Henry Iblings .... double: Errol Flynn (uncredited)
Ed Lewis .... boxing double: Ward Bond (uncredited)
Freddie Steele .... double: Errol Flynn (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production Companies
  • Warner Bros. (presents) (as Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.) (A Warner Bros.-First National Picture)
DistributorsOther Companies
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
104 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Finland:K-16 | Germany:12 | Norway:A (1950) | Sweden:15 | USA:Approved (Certificate No. 8440) | USA:Not Rated (DVD rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
The press announced Phil Silvers for the film, but he was never signed. Presumably he would played the Jack Carson role.See more »
Goofs:
Factual errors: Joe Choynski is shown as a big brute. The real Choynski was a middleweight who never weighed over 155 lb., and was much smaller than Corbett.See more »
Quotes:
James J. Corbett aka Gentleman Jim:[to Victoria Ware] That's the girl! You just keep pulling for me to lose, will you? That's the way I like it! Bring me good luck!See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Thank Your Lucky Stars (1943)See more »
Soundtrack:
The Wearing of the GreenSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
13 out of 17 people found the following review useful.
about the man who defeated the Great John L., 30 April 2003
Author: halmp-1 from st. louis

Errol Flynn and Ward Bond are perfect examples of how successful an actor can be without one second of acting school classes/workshops. Both were absolute naturals. Why was Flynn one of the biggest stars of his time? He had not only the physical ability to handle any role he undertook, he had the subtle skill to make the role totally believeable. As Gentleman Jim Corbett, heavyweight champion from Sept., 1892 until his startling loss to the inferior Bob Fitzsimmons, March, 1897, Flynn certainly had the physicality to make himself appear as a "real" heavyweight champion, albeit of the sport's prehistoric era. As well, the Flynn personality---very much evident in all of his film vehicles---brings color to his roles. Here, as Corbett, Flynn perfectly captures the rogueish, dapper, likeable former champion. And he is able to match the Corbett boxing style. As for Bond, he absolutely matches Flynn's portrayal. As the blustery but good-natured John L. Sullivan, Bond likewise brings both the physicality and personality that made "The Boston Strong Boy" the Babe Ruth of his sports period. In the climax of the film, after Corbett has taken his title via a 21st round knockout, Sullivan appears at Corbett's victory party. Instead of berating his ring conqueror, Bond's Sullivan warmly and sincerely congratulates him...earning everyone's admiration, on the screen and bringing moistness to the eyes of viewers. It is a tragedy that both Flynn and Bond died prematurely. "Gentleman Jim" is a must for all sports fans, not just those who enjoy boxing. It is a thoroughly enjoyable story, with a solid cast throughout. A bit of trivia about Corbett: in 1926, he was brought in to the training camp, as an advisor, to Gene Tunney before the first fight with Jack Dempsey. Though Corbett was almost 60, he actually sparred with the 28-year old Tunney. Gene later reported that even an elderly Corbett gave him more trouble than most of his actual opponents. In fact, Corbett---because of his success during the Tunney sparring sessions---actually considered a comeback but ultimately rejected the notion.

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