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Footlight Serenade (1942) Poster

Trivia

Unused in the release print, footage of Betty Grable and chorus girls performing "I'll Be Marching to a Love Song" (music by Ralph Rainger, lyrics by Leo Robin) would wind up in the all-star short subject, Hollywood Victory Caravan (1945). In the 1942 feature, a brief bit of this number, serving as the coda, was done by Miss Grable, John Payne, Victor Mature and chorus. Another deletion was a slapstick dance routine by Miss Grable and Mr. Mature which can be seen in Hidden Hollywood: Treasures from the 20th Century Fox Vaults, hosted by Joan Collins.
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Ironically, in the scene where Ms. Grable is rehearsing dance routines over and over (as she is the understudy) in the event she is called upon to fill in for the leading lady, her friend Flo, played by Jane Wyman, utters the line "You have as much chance of going on as I have of becoming First Lady." Of course, Ms Wyman's husband, Ronald Reagan, did become President, but was remarried to Nancy Reagan by that time.
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Fidel LaBarba , former Olympic Gold Metal Winner ( 1924 ) & World Flyweight Boxing Champion ( 1925 -27 ) Co-Wrote the story with Kenneth Earl while working directly for Daryl F. Zanuck. The Original story named "Kid Dynamite", was loosely based on Fidel's own life at the time. Fidel gave boxing lessons to Daryl F. Zanuck on a regular basis. Noted in article in February 15, 1937 Life Magazine.
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Surprisingly, given her ascending popularity with moviegoers at the time, Betty Grable was billed second to John Payne in this movie. However, poster art for the picture emphasized Betty in full figure. Later that year, Miss Grable would receive top billing over Mr. Payne in their next musical, Springtime in the Rockies (1942).
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Twentieth Century-Fox had wanted to borrow Lucille Ball from RKO, but Miss Ball had no interest in playing the secondary part of Flo La Verne.
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After this black-and-white production finished, Twentieth Century-Fox would implement the policy of utilizing Technicolor for all future Betty Grable features. The only monochromatic exception would be her guest spot in Four Jills in a Jeep (1944), crooning the standard from 1908, "Cuddle Up a Little Closer" (music by Karl Hoschna, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach -- which she already had performed the year before in the Technicolored Coney Island (1943). Miss Grable would not exempt from the Technicolor clause two black-and-white dramas offered her: The Razor's Edge (1946) (Anne Baxter's Oscar-winning part) and Pickup on South Street (1953) (the Jean Peters role). For Betty's final picture, How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955), Color by DeLuxe was employed.
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