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Footlight Serenade (1942)

6.4
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Ratings: 6.4/10 from 117 users  
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A boxing champ gets involved with a Broadway show and a shapely chorine...who's engaged to his new sparring partner.

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(story), , 3 more credits »
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Title: Footlight Serenade (1942)

Footlight Serenade (1942) on IMDb 6.4/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
William J. 'Bill' Smith
...
Pat Lambert
...
Tommy Lundy
...
Flo La Verne
...
Bruce McKay
...
Slap
Cobina Wright ...
Estelle Evans (as Cobina Wright Jr.)
June Lang ...
June
Frank Orth ...
Mike the stage doorman
Mantan Moreland ...
Amos. Tommy's Dresser (as Manton Moreland)
Irving Bacon ...
Stagehand
Charles Tannen ...
Charlie, Stage manager
George Dobbs ...
Frank, Dance director
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Storyline

Conceited World Champion boxer Tommy Lundy decides to test his popularity in a Broadway show. Tommy always has an eye for the ladies and he starts paying attention to beautiful chorus girl Pat Lambert. Pat's boyfriend Bill Smith isn't impressed with Tommy even though Tommy gets him a boxing part in the show. When Tommy finds out that Pat and Bill were secretly together the night before the show opens, he angrily plans to turn the boxing scene with Bill into a real bout. Written by Gary Jackson <garyjack5@cogeco.ca>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

broadway show | boxer


Certificate:

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 August 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Footlight Serenade  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

After this black-and-white production finished, Twentieth Century-Fox would implement the policy of utilizing Technicolor for all future Betty Grable features. The only monochromatic exception would be her guest spot in Four Jills in a Jeep (1944), crooning the standard from 1908, "Cuddle Up a Little Closer" (music by Karl Hoschna, lyrics by Otto A. Harbach -- which she already had performed the year before in the Technicolored Coney Island (1943). Miss Grable would not exempt from the Technicolor clause two black-and-white dramas offered her: The Razor's Edge (1946) (Anne Baxter's Oscar-winning part) and Pickup on South Street (1953) (the Jean Peters role). For Betty's final picture, How to Be Very, Very Popular (1955), Color by DeLuxe was employed. See more »

Quotes

Bruce McKay: She's closed up more nightclubs than the chief of police!
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Connections

Featured in Biography: Betty Grable: Behind the Pin-up (1995) See more »

Soundtracks

I'll Be Marching to a Love Song
(uncredited)
Music by Ralph Rainger
Lyrics by Leo Robin
Sung and danced by Betty Grable, Victor Mature, John Payne, chorus
This number cut very short; rest used in a Movietone short
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User Reviews

 
Good early Grable backstage musical despite not being in Technicolor...
14 October 2006 | by (U.S.A.) – See all my reviews

As in A YANK IN THE R.A.F., BETTY GRABLE proved with this one that she didn't need Technicolor to sparkle. As it is, she could (as she herself modestly said) sing a little, dance a little, and act a little. Well, she turned those abilities into a show biz personality on screen that kept her popular at the box-office, especially during wartime America in World War II as the nation's number one pin-up girl.

Here she doesn't expand too much on those talents, but does well as a chorus girl who becomes the love interest of reliable Fox stars VICTOR MATURE and JOHN PAYNE, as boxers. When you watch both of them fighting for Betty's affection, it reminds you why they were so often chosen to co-star opposite vivacious Betty.

It's also fun to see a supporting cast that includes JANE WYMAN (still playing sharp-tongued chorines at this stage in her career), JAMES GLEASON and PHIL SILVERS. None of the songs are particularly memorable, but it's all good fun as backstage musicals go.

Since I'm used to recalling Grable in all of her Technicolor films, it seems strange to see her in glorious B&W, but her fans should enjoy this one--and her co-stars are just fine, particularly Mature as the overly cocky boxer who can't take his mind off Grable. No wonder COBINA WRIGHT, JR. is his jealous sweetheart.

My favorite line: Victor Mature saying in all seriousness to Betty Grable: "You know, you're right. I never do think of myself first."


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