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The Falcon Takes Over (1942)

 -  Crime | Mystery  -  29 May 1942 (USA)
6.6
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Ratings: 6.6/10 from 442 users  
Reviews: 15 user | 5 critic

The Falcon and reporter Ann Riordan try to solve a string of murders after an ex-wrestler, released from jail, goes looking for his girl friend.

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(screenplay), (screenplay), 2 more credits »
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Title: The Falcon Takes Over (1942)

The Falcon Takes Over (1942) on IMDb 6.6/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Lynn Bari ...
Ann Riordan
...
...
Helen Gilbert ...
Diana Kenyon
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Storyline

One night in New York, beefy escaped convict Moose Malloy goes hunting for his ex-girlfriend Velma, leaving a trail of mayhem behind him. Velma seems to be well-hidden, and adventurer The Falcon, intrigued, investigates on his own, approaching the heart of the mystery via a varied sequence of shady characters and attractive women. Written by Rod Crawford <puffinus@u.washington.edu>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

MYSTERY that you'll laugh at...when -- The Falcon TAKES OVER

Genres:

Crime | Mystery

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 May 1942 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Falcon Takes Over  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The third of sixteen movies for the suave detective nicknamed "The Falcon", and the third of four starring George Sanders. See more »

Goofs

In a night club scene The Falcon and Diana Kenyon are sitting close together talking. There is a plant pot on a ledge behind them, partially obscured and on the table a champagne glass is in front of Diana Kenyon. In the next shot, there is a gap separating the two, the flower pot is now centrally placed between them and the champagne glass has moved position. See more »

Quotes

Jonathan 'Goldy' Locke: [Obviously frightened of the brutish Moose, who has commandeered his car] I guess I better drop you now. I got a date.
Moose Malloy: [Ominously] You wouldn't want it with an angel, would you?
Jonathan 'Goldy' Locke: [Meekly nervous] No, sir.
Moose Malloy: Then keep on drivin'.
Jonathan 'Goldy' Locke: [Meekly resigned] Yes, sir.
See more »

Connections

References The Boys from Syracuse (1940) See more »

Soundtracks

There's a New Moon Over The Old Mill
(uncredited)
Written by Herb Magidson and Allie Wrubel
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User Reviews

 
Maybe this might offend a few Raymond Chandler fans, but this is one of the better Falcon movies
20 November 2007 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

As I watched the opening credits, I was surprised to see that this Falcon movie was actually based on the Raymond Chandler book "Farewell, My Lovely"--which I'd seen twice before in the forms of MURDER, MY SWEET (1944) and FAREWELL, MY LOVELY (1975). What particularly surprised me about this is that was a originally Philip Marlowe story, NOT a Gay Lawrence (a.k.a. "The Falcon") film. Now Raymond Chandler purists might balk at this, but the film actually compares reasonably well to these later films--even with a leading man who is so unlike the hard-boiled detective, Marlowe. While the settings were "classed up" quite a bit compared to the novel, the overall plot is still there with only a few minor changes (such as at the very end and the disposition of "Velma"). Additionally, Allan Jenkins, Lawrence's lady friend and the cops were integrated into the original plot.

Now if you were going to rate this film, you can't really compare this RKO B-film to the two later higher budget films. The later films are more faithful to the book, but they also have the advantage of being made AFTER Chandler became more famous--and when producers would have never considered getting rid of the Marlowe character. And, while some might be very critical of the lower budget THE FALCON TAKES OVER, if you compare it to other B-detective series films of the day (such as Boston Blackie, Charlie Chan or The Lone Wolf), it is clearly superior--mostly due to the basic foundation laid by Chandler. Plus, George Sanders is his usual affable and suave character--a guy that's hard not to like even if he isn't as jaded and tough as Marlowe.

For lovers of the B-movie genre, this is an exceptional and engaging film--significantly better than the later Tom Conway films in the series. In fact, aside from 'the earlier THE GAY FALCON, it might just be the best in the series.


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