Someone has left a basket with four kittens on Butch the cat's doorstep. He compares markings and quickly decides he's the father. This will not do, so first he tries burying the kits, but ... See full summary »

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Someone has left a basket with four kittens on Butch the cat's doorstep. He compares markings and quickly decides he's the father. This will not do, so first he tries burying the kits, but they were left behind when he picked up the basket. Next, it's the old Pied Piper routine; three of them fall for it, but the fourth takes a turn and crawls right into the house and the others follow. Butch catches the rogue just as he's rubbing against his mistresses leg. He stuffs it into his pillow and tries to hide it. The kitten gets out and Butch traps it in a large urn just as the other three walk past and head for mischief. Kitten two goes into the urn after unraveling the mistress' knitting; number three gets caught as he's climbing the curtains, and number four slip behind some books while going for the fish tank. All the while, the mistress is chasing Butch. With the full urn, Butch dashes outside, where he falls and breaks the urn. But lucky Butch his mistress likes the kittens. Written by Jon Reeves <jreeves@imdb.com>

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12 September 1942 (USA)  »

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(Western Electric Sound System)

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(Technicolor)

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1.37 : 1
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Trivia

The following public service announcement is printed on the closing title card below "The End," with a shadowy statue of a Continental soldier in the background: "America needs your money. Buy War Bonds and Stamps at this theater." See more »

Quotes

[closing scenery after the owner discovers the 4 kittens of Butch, he ran out the door to try hide them]
Butch's owner: [after the owner chases Butch & sees the 4 look alike kittens] Oh, they're adorable. And they look just like you, Butch. They're chips off the old block.
Butch (the cat): [last line, just before closing credits Butch also sounds like Donald Duck] Well, I'll be doggone.
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Crazy Credits

MGM's Leo, the Lion does four extremely quick and short roars, once for each kitten, to the tune of "Hold that Tiger". This unique event occurred only twice, in Blitz Wolf (1942) and Chips Off the Old Block (1942). 21 days (3 weeks), differ in their ages, Tex Avery's Blitz Wolf (1942) was first, on Saturday, August 22nd, 1942. Rudolf Ising's Chips Off the Old Block (1942) was second on Saturday, September 12nd, 1942. See more »

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User Reviews

 
Chips Off the Old Block was a nice discovery of a cartoon I found on Daily Motion
28 November 2008 | by (Baton Rouge, La.) – See all my reviews

Just found this M-G-M cartoon short on Daily Motion. A cat finds out he has four kittens and tries to keep his female master from finding out. This is a cute and very amusing cartoon usually devoid of slapstick but there are plenty of chases nonetheless, mostly concerning the adult cat trying to keep his kids out of sight. Rudolf Ising gets a credit here so it must be his influence director Robert Allan is basing his approach on. This is one of those rare M-G-M animated shorts I've never seen on the "Tom and Jerry" show on weekday afternoons when I came home from school in the '70s. Thanks to the internet, I've been discovering new animated gems almost every day. So on that note, I recommend Chips Off the Old Block.


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