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Washington Melodrama (1941)

Passed  -  Drama  -  18 April 1941 (USA)
6.7
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Ratings: 6.7/10 from 96 users  
Reviews: 8 user

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Title: Washington Melodrama (1941)

Washington Melodrama (1941) on IMDb 6.7/10

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Calvin Claymore
...
Laurie Claymore
Kent Taylor ...
Hal Thorne
...
Whitney 'Whit' King (as Dan Dailey Jr.)
Lee Bowman ...
Ronnie Colton
Fay Holden ...
Mrs. Elizabeth Claymore
Virginia Grey ...
Teddy Carlyle
Anne Gwynne ...
Mary Morgan
Sara Haden ...
Mrs. Harriet Harrington
Olaf Hytten ...
Parry (Claymore's brother)
...
Dist. Atty. Donnelly
Cliff Clark ...
'Simp' Simpson
Hal K. Dawson ...
Harry Logan
Thurston Hall ...
Sen. Morton
Joseph Crehan ...
Phil Sampson
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Storyline

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Taglines:

LOVE SECRETS OF A MILLIONAIRE'S DANGEROUS AGE! (original print media ad - all caps0 See more »

Genres:

Drama

Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

18 April 1941 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Washington Melodrama  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Although the writing source credit is a play, no production of it has been found. See more »

Soundtracks

Fishing for Suckers
(1941)
Music and Lyrics by Earl K. Brent (as Earl Brent)
Played during the opening credits
Played by the nightclub band and sung and danced by Dan Dailey and Virginia Grey
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User Reviews

 
some lively performances and some so-so musical acts
4 July 2012 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

Frank Morgan gets mixed up in a "Washington Melodrama" in this 1941 film also starring Dan Dailey, Kent Taylor, and Ann Rutherford.

Morgan plays steel tycoon Calvin Claymore, who is preparing to go before Congress to champion his relief organization, which wants the U.S. to help the children who are starving overseas as a result of World War II. Since this film was released in 1941, we hadn't yet entered the war. He's got some opposition, including his daughter's fiancé, newspaper editor Hal (Kent Taylor). Calvin's family, daughter Laurie (Ann Rutherford) and wife (Fay Holden) are away for the summer, and he's terribly lonely.

He and a friend go to a nightclub, where he meets a showgirl, Mary (Anne Gwynne) whom he takes sightseeing and escorts around town. I think that's all there was to it - you know these old films, it's sometimes pretty obscure as to what's going on.

Anyway, when his family returns, Mary understands that he won't be seeing her. She then reveals something he's known all along: the whole meeting was a set-up by an entertainer at the club, Whit (Dan Dailey) but though she went out with Calvin, she didn't soak him for money as planned. After Calvin leaves, Mary finds an envelope from him with a letter and a bunch of money. She starts to run after him but is stopped by Whit. He wants the money; she wants to return it. The two fight and she is killed. This is going to cause some problems for poor Calvin.

When all is revealed, Laurie goes to work trying to find out the identity of the killer with the help of a reporter (Lee Bowman).

Solid movie, with a delightful performance by Ann Rutherford, who dons a French accent for part of the film, and an excellent one by Frank Morgan, in a different kind of role for him. Actors in those days were typecast by their studios and it's difficult to see them in other roles, and when you do, it's often a revelation. Morgan here shows he can hold down a lead and do serious roles - something he did early in his career before getting noticed in his usual type of part.

Lee Bowman is terrific as reporter Ronnie Colton - funny, smooth, and charming. A leading man type with the soul of a character actor - good combo.

Entertaining.


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