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Suspicion (1941) Poster

(1941)

Trivia

Jump to: Director Cameo (1) | Spoilers (5)
Joan Fontaine liked the character of Lina in Suspicion (1941) so much that she sent Alfred Hitchcock a note after she read the novel ("Before the Fact", by Anthony Berkeley) offering to play the part for free, if necessary.
In the scene where Johnnie brings a glass of milk up to Lina, Alfred Hitchcock had a light hidden in the glass to make it appear more sinister.
In interviews, Alfred Hitchcock said that an RKO executive ordered that all scenes in which Cary Grant appeared menacing be excised from the film. When the cutting was completed, the film ran only fifty-five minutes. The scenes were later restored, Hitchcock said, because he shot each piece of film so that there was only one way to edit them together properly.
Joan Fontaine's performance in this movie is the only Oscar-winning performance that Alfred Hitchcock directed.
This movie marked Alfred Hitchcock's first film as a producer as well as director.
Cary Grant's first role in an Alfred Hitchcock film. He would later star in three more: Notorious (1946), To Catch a Thief (1955), and North by Northwest (1959).
Johnnie calls Lina by his nickname for her, "Monkey Face", 19 times throughout the movie.
Despite the indecision over its ending, the film was a tremendous success, and more importantly Alfred Hitchcock had enjoyed a measure of creative freedom which he knew that he would not get at Selznick International.
After this film became a box office success, Alfred Hitchcock's name began to end up on the title of his films starting with Saboteur (1942).
Joan Fontaine, in character as Lina, narrates the trailer on screen and speaks directly to the audience.
Originally the story was intended as a B picture to star George Sanders and Anne Shirley. Then when Alfred Hitchcock became involved the budget increased and Laurence Olivier and Frances Dee were to star.
The dog in the movie is a Sealyham Terrier named "Johnnie" and Alfred Hitchcock's own dog. The main male character is also named "Johnnie" and this name was Hitch's original idea for the movie title. Alfred Hitchcock kept Sealyhams for many years. In his movie The Birds (1963), Hitch walks out of the pet store with Sealyhams on a lead.
Samson Raphaelson considered Suspicion "in many ways my best screenplay."
"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on May 4, 1942 with Joan Fontaine reprising her film role.
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Harry E. Edington was originally the producer of this film. But when the film was in production, Harry Edington got fired. So Alfred Hitchcock became producer as well as director.
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on January 21, 1946 with Cary Grant and Nigel Bruce reprising their film roles.
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Michèle Morgan was tested for the role of Lina and Constance Worth replaced Phyllis Barry as "Mrs. Fitzpatrick."
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on January 4, 1943 with Joan Fontaine and Nigel Bruce reprising their film roles.
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David O. Selznick was dissatisfied with Miklós Rózsa's scoring for the ski sequence in "Spellbound" and replaced it with a cue written by Franz Waxman for the final scene (Fast car driving scene) in this film.
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"The Screen Guild Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on November 24, 1949 with Joan Fontaine, Cary Grant and Nigel Bruce reprising their film roles.
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First cinema film of Faith Brook.
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"Academy Award Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on October 30, 1946 with Cary Grant reprising his film role.
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Alfred Hitchcock quipped that this was his second completely British film (following Rebecca (1940)). He explained that both films featured predominantly British actors in key roles, were set in Britain, and their source materials were written by a British author.
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Film historian Ben Mankiewicz has noted that Cary Grant was so displeased with his experience with director Alfred Hitchcock during the making of this film that he publicly vowed never again to work with the director. The rift between actor and director was mended, however, and Grant and Hitchcock collaborated on three more films, each generally well-received by audiences and critics.
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According to film historian Felicia Feaster, Cary Grant's frustration with Alfred Hitchcock stemmed from the director's attentive behavior toward leading lady, Joan Fontaine. Grant felt that Hitchcock gave Fontaine preferential treatment to the detriment of his character. This behavior led to a lifelong bitter relationship between Grant and Fontaine, exacerbated by Fontaine's Academy Award success and Grant's perceived snub for this film.
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Nigel Bruce played Dr. Watson in several of the Basil Rathbone Sherlock Holmes films. Cedric Hardwicke son Edward Hardwicke played Dr. Watson in the later Sherlock Holmes movies with Jeremy Brett as Holmes.
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Director Cameo 

Alfred Hitchcock: about 45 minutes in, mailing a letter at the village post office.

Spoilers 

The trivia items below may give away important plot points.

In an interview with Dick Cavett, Alfred Hitchcock explained how he managed to call attention to the glass of milk containing the fatal dose of poison. He wanted it stand out so he had a glass made that contained a small battery operated light so the glass would show up in the long down the hallway shot.
Alfred Hitchcock originally wanted Johnnie to be guilty, but the studio insisted that the public wouldn't accept Cary Grant as a murderer. Hitchcock's original ending had Johnnie killing Lina by poisoning her milk, but then convicting himself by mailing a letter that Lina had written. Joan Fontaine said, Cary Grant "did kill me in the original cut, but at a preview, the audience simply refused to accept him as the murderer."
In one draft of the script, when Johnnie realizes what was in Lina's mind, he runs away until he can "find some way to pay" his debts (both financial and moral), and joins the air force under a false name. She finds out where he's stationed and proudly watches as his plane, with his nickname for her painted on it, takes off.
Unlike the novel "Before the fact", the film focuses much more on the psychology of Lina. For example, the Anagram scene in the film isn't in the novel. Another example is where the atmosphere becomes very dark when Lina reaches the house after visiting the land Johnnie and Beaky decided for their corporation. When Lina finds out that Beaky is alive, the atmosphere becomes a bright and joyful atmosphere while Vienna Blood waltz is playing in the background. Unlike the book, the film also focuses on the inner conflict of Lina. For Example, the scene where Lina talks to her father's portrait - "He didn't go to Paris. He didn't go to Paris I tell you." Unlike the novel, the film's focus on the psychological side of Lina makes it more ambiguous about Johnnie being a murderer.
Alfred Hitchcock wanted an ending similar to the climax of the novel, but the studio, more concerned with Cary Grant's "heroic" image, insisted that it be changed. Writer Donald Spoto, in his biography of Hitchcock, "The Dark Side Of Genius", disputes Hitchcock's claim to have been overruled on the film's ending. Spoto claims that the first RKO treatment and memos between Hitchcock and the studio show that Hitchcock emphatically desired to make a film about a woman's fantasy life.

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