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The King's Jester (1941)

Il re si diverte (original title)
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Cast

Credited cast:
...
Rigoletto
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Gilda (as Maria Mercader)
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Il re Francesco Iº
Doris Duranti ...
Margot
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La duchessa di Cosse
Elli Parvo ...
La zingara
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Il conte di Saint Vallier
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Sparafucile
Loredana ...
Diana Di Saint Vallier
Franco Coop ...
Il duca di Cosse
Corrado Racca ...
Signor De Brion
Rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Giulio Battiferri ...
Uno dei rapitori di Gilda
Oreste Bilancia ...
Un cortegiano
Gildo Bocci ...
Il Gran Visir
Ruggero Capodaglio ...
Un cortegiano
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Storyline

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Plot Keywords:

based on play | See All (1) »

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and featuring the magnificent voice of FERRUCCIO TAGLIAVINI the sensation of the 1947 season at The METROPOLITAN OPERA See more »

Genres:

Drama

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Details

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Release Date:

25 June 1947 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The King's Jester  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Italian censorship visa # 31429 delivered on 24-10-1941. See more »

Connections

Version of Rigoletto (1975) See more »

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User Reviews

"Rigoletto" without the arias.
31 July 2001 | by See all my reviews

Michel Simon is magnificently Laughton-esque as Rigoletto the hunchbacked clown in the dramatic version of the Victor Hugo play that was to form the basis for the opera of Giuseppe Verdi. The film also features Maria Mercader as Gilda, Rigoletto's lovesick daughter who falls in love with the lecherous king, played by Rossano Brazzi. Favorite actress of Mussolini's fascist regime, Doris Duranti, performs a deliciously vampy dance as the prostitute Margot-Maddalena. Mario Bonnard directed this true gem from the Italian fascist era.


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