Without success, Porky Pig constantly tries to silence an alley cat who has been disturbing his slumber by constantly singing loudly.

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(as I. Freleng)

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(story)

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
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Porky Pig / Cat (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Without success, Porky Pig constantly tries to silence an alley cat who has been disturbing his slumber by constantly singing loudly. Written by Ondre Lombard <olombard@artist-bros.org>

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Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Release Date:

20 September 1941 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Säveliä sydämestä  »

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Remade as Back Alley Oproar (1948) See more »

Soundtracks

Chi mi frena in tal momento
(uncredited)
aka "Sextet"
From "Lucia di Lammermoor"
Music by Gaetano Donizetti
Lyrics by Salvatore Cammarano
Sung by the Cat and his lives
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User Reviews

 
Porky Pig vs. music
4 October 2006 | by (Longueuil, Quebec, Canada) – See all my reviews

"Notes to You" stars Porky Pig as he prepares himself for a good sleep and a silent night.

Then, a cat climbs on Porky's fence and, unfortunately for Porky, he's a music-loving cat. The maestro feline starts to practice his operas, which evidently disturbs Porky's sleep. The remaining of the cartoon is an operetta showing the pig's attempts to make the cat quiet.

"Notes to You" doesn't lift any big laughs but it gives a smile anyway. This cartoon's highlights are not its laughs but its music. The cat is a good singer and the songs are well appropriate from the first Figaro till the last farewell.

The music is also mixed to Porky's movements. This is particularly evident when Porky runs on one side of a fence and the cat runs on his side in a synchronized way.

The lesson of this cartoon (if we can say it this way) is that it's bad to kill animals. Because Porky shoots the cat at the end. Ultimately, Porky feels sorry for what he did but he gets a punishment. Cats have nine lives but it appears that they have nine ghosts too. So, the ghosts get together and sing like if they were in a choral.

Animation still feels prehistoric but it's not the essential element of this cartoon. The music is all that's needed.


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