How Green Was My Valley
Quicklinks
Top Links
trailers and videosfull cast and crewtriviaofficial sitesmemorable quotes
Overview
main detailscombined detailsfull cast and crewcompany credits
Awards & Reviews
user reviewsexternal reviewsawardsuser ratingsparents guidemessage board
Plot & Quotes
plot summarysynopsisplot keywordsmemorable quotes
Did You Know?
triviagoofssoundtrack listingcrazy creditsalternate versionsmovie connectionsFAQ
Other Info
box office/businessrelease datesfilming locationstechnical specsliterature listingsNewsDesk
Promotional
taglines trailers and videos posters photo gallery
External Links
showtimesofficial sitesmiscellaneousphotographssound clipsvideo clips

Connect with IMDb



2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2005

19 items from 2016


Happy Halloween, Everyone!

31 October 2016 9:19 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Happy Haloween. Please enjoy this Photo of Oscar nominee and birthday girl Sally Kirkland wearing a live tarantula Halloween isn't only for trick or treating and costume parties though it is most definitely for those things. It's also home to many fine birthdays and events on this day in showbiz history... 

1795 Poet John Keats is born. Two hundred and fourteen years later Ben Whishaw plays him beautifully in the still undervalued Jane Campion movie Bright Star

1864 Nevada becomes the 36th State. Without Nevada no Las Vegas, one of the favorite cities of filmmakers and storytellers. It is entirely untrue that what happens there stays there -- it's always broadcast!

1879 Oscar nominee Sara Allgood (How Green Was My Valley) is born in Dublin

1892 Sir Arthur Conan Doyle publishes the Adventures of Sherlock Holmes. Movies and TV haven't shut up about the Great Detective since they were invented as mediums. 

1906 George Bernard Shaw »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


The Furniture: Designing Dignity in "How Green Was My Valley"

24 October 2016 7:48 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

"The Furniture" our weekly series on Production Design. Here's Daniel Walber

Filmmaking is often an art borne of flexibility. Tim Burton built Sleepy Hollow from scratch when he couldn’t find just the right town in the real world. Vincente Minnelli was forced to make Brigadoon indoors in Hollywood, because the studio wouldn’t pay for an expensive production in Scotland. Both films are likely better for it, too.

The same is perhaps true for How Green Was My Valley, which premiered 75 years ago this week. John Ford wanted to make shoot it on location in Wales, but World War II intervened. Instead, the production team built an entire mining town in the Santa Monica Mountains. This condensed and idealized version of the setting of Richard Llewellyn’s 1939 novel is among the most emotionally resonant sets of its era.

The film won five Academy Awards, including Best Picture and Best Art Direction. »

- Daniel Walber

Permalink | Report a problem


A Fine Pair And The Limits Of Claudia Love

11 September 2016 9:00 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

This fall semester I started taking an Italian language class two evenings a week with my daughter, and Thursday night I was looking to decompress after our first big quiz. (Scores haven’t been revealed yet, but I think we did just fine.) So I started rummaging through my shelves and came across the Warner Archives DVD of Francesco Maselli’s A Fine Pair (1968), an ostensibly breezy romantic caper comedy which reteams Rock Hudson and Claudia Cardinale, a pairing their public was presumably clamoring for after their previous outing together in Blindfold (1965), a Universal programmer written and directed by Phillip Dunne, the screenwriter of, among many other notable movies, How Green Was My Valley. I’ve had a mad crush on Claudia ever since I first saw her in Circus World (1964) with John Wayne when I was but a youngster, and I always welcome the chance to visit movies of »

- Dennis Cozzalio

Permalink | Report a problem


Films For Labor Day Weekend

3 September 2016 5:32 AM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Labor Day celebrates working people and the labor unions that brought working people the 40-hour work week, the 8-hour day, overtime pay, work-place safety, paid holidays and vacations, and a host of other protections and benefits. To honor those hard-working people and organized labor, here is a list (in no particular order) of a dozen worthy narrative films for Labor Day.

Norma Rae (1979)

For many people, the words “labor union” bring to mind the image of Sally Field standing up in defiance in “Norma Rae.” Field won an Oscar for her unforgettable, inspiring character, a worker in a Southern textile factory who becomes involved in labor organizing and stands up to management after the factory workers’ health is threatened in the workplace. This stirring drama, based on a true story, also stars Beau Bridges as Norma Rae’s husband Sonny and Ron Leibman as an union organizer from the Northeast. »

- Movie Geeks

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Citizen Kane’ 75th Anniversary and Orson Welles’ Hell to Get the Film Released

1 May 2016 9:23 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

May 1 marks the 75th anniversary of “Citizen Kane,” one of the most admired and influential films of all time. There are clear parallels between the title character and the powerful newspaper baron William Randolph Hearst, who tried to block the film’s release. But “Kane” fans may not be aware of all the other off-camera struggles, including multiple threats of lawsuits and a smear campaign against Orson Welles.

Variety chronicled all the events leading up to the (much-delayed) May 1, 1941, debut, and the struggles that continued afterwards for Welles and distributor Rko.

Jan. 13, 1941: Rko planned the world premiere on Feb. 14. But according to Variety Archives, Hearst threatened a court injunction to prevent the release of “Citizen Kane.” Rko prexy George Schaefer met with Hearst attorneys and the script “was put under a legal microscope” as they searched for anything that might be considered libelous to Hearst. Schaefer said he had »

- Tim Gray

Permalink | Report a problem


Dillinger

18 April 2016 9:23 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Guns! Guns! Guns! John Milius' rootin' tootin' bio of the most famous of the '30s bandits has plenty of good things to its credit, especially its terrific, funny cast, topped by the unlikely star Warren Oates. The battles between Dillinger's team of all-star bank robbers and Ben Johnson's G-Man aren't neglected, as Milius savors every gun recoil and Tommy gun blast. Dillinger Blu-ray + DVD Arrow Video U.S. 1973 / Color / 1:85 widescreen / 107 min. / Street Date April 26, 2016 / 39.95 Starring Warren Oates, Ben Johnson, Michelle Phillips, Cloris Leachman, Harry Dean Stanton, Geoffrey Lewis, John Ryan, Richard Dreyfuss, Steve Kanaly, John Martino, Roy Jenson, Frank McRae. Cinematography Jules Brenner Special Effects A.D. Flowers, Cliff Wenger Edited by Fred R. Feitshans, Jr. Original Music Barry De Vorzon Produced by Buzz Feitshans Written and Directed by John Milius

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

There it was in the dentist's office, an article in either »

- Glenn Erickson

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Cult Films You Need To See Before You Die

15 March 2016 2:55 AM, PDT | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Arrow Films

There are several books dedicated to cult cinema and, if they all agree on one thing, it’s that there is no single definition of what constitutes a cult movie.

If you mean a film admired by a minority, it’s that. Or if you mean a film that inspires a near obsessive passion amongst certain people, it’s that too. But it may also refer to foreign-language curiosities, films so bad they really are worth watching and such bizarre time capsules as 1950s public information films.

For our purposes, though, it’s a film whose audience is bigger now than when it was first released. Whether a film is good or bad, posterity is the only real judge of its merits. Who would’ve believed that Citizen Kane, a miserable flop when first released, could top Sight & Sound’s Best Film list while How Green Was My Valley, »

- Ian Watson

Permalink | Report a problem


Alejandro G. Inarritu Makes History With Directing Oscar Win for ‘The Revenant’

28 February 2016 9:26 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

The Revenant” director Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has won the best director Academy Award — marking only the third back-to-back Oscar win for any director.

“Gracias a la Academia — Thanks to the Academy,” the Mexican native began his acceptance. “I can’t believe this is happening. It’s amazing to receive this award tonight. It’s much more beautiful for me to share it with all the talented and crazy cast and colleagues and crew members that made this film possible.”

Inarritu, who won last year for “Birdman,” topped Lenny Abrahamson for “Room,” Tom McCarthy for “Spotlight,” Adam McKay for “The Big Short” and George Miller for “Mad Max: Fury Road.”

The 52-year-old has joined directing icons John Ford and Joseph L. Mankiewicz as the only helmers to win in consecutive years. Ford won for “Grapes of Wrath” and “How Green Was My Valley” in 1940-41, while Mankiewicz won for “A Letter to Three Wives »

- Dave McNary

Permalink | Report a problem


Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu wins Best Director Oscar for 'The Revenant'

28 February 2016 8:40 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

As predicted, Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu ("The Revenant") won Best Director at the Oscars on Sunday. He was Gold Derby's frontrunner with odds of 2/9 to prevail, just one year after winning for "Birdman." The last time someone won back-to-back Oscars for Best Director was Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who prevailed for "A Letter to Three Wives" (1949) and "All About Eve" (1950). Prior to that, John Ford had won two of his record four Oscars consecutively for helming "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940) and "How Green Was My Valley" (1941). -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Our official odds are derived from the predictions of 28 Expert film journalists along with our seven in-house Editors who cover awards year-round, the Top 24 Users who got the top scores predicting last year's Oscars, the All-Star Users who did the be »

Permalink | Report a problem


13 Oscar Records That Could Be Broken Sunday Night

27 February 2016 8:00 AM, PST | The Wrap | See recent The Wrap news »

Every Academy Awards show provides a little slice of history, but more Oscar records than usual could hang in the balance on Sunday night at the Dolby Theatre. Here are some of the landmarks that could conceivably be reached by the time the final envelope is opened: If Alejandro G. Inarritu wins Best Director for “The Revenant,” he’ll be the third director to win that award in consecutive years, after John Ford for “The Grapes of Wrath” and “How Green Was My Valley” (1940-41) and Joseph L. Mankiewicz for “A Letter to Three Wives” and “All About Eve” (1949-50). If “The. »

- Steve Pond

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar predictions: Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu will win Best Director for 'The Revenant'

26 February 2016 1:16 PM, PST | Gold Derby | See recent Gold Derby news »

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu ("The Revenant") is the frontrunner with odds of 1/4 to win Best Director at the Oscars on Sunday, just one year after winning for "Birdman." The last time someone won back-to-back Oscars for Best Director was Joseph L. Mankiewicz, who prevailed for "A Letter to Three Wives" (1949) and "All About Eve" (1950). Prior to that, John Ford had won two of his record four Oscars consecutively for helming "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940) and "How Green Was My Valley" (1941). -Break- Subscribe to Gold Derby Breaking News Alerts & Experts’ Latest Oscar Predictions Our official odds are derived from the predictions of 27 Expert film journalists along with our seven in-house Editors who cover awards year-round, the Top 24 Users who got the top scores predicting last year's Oscars, the All-Star Users who did the best for the past two years combined and t...' »

Permalink | Report a problem


6 Days til Oscar. Trivia Party

22 February 2016 9:45 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

We're less than a week from Hollywood's High Holy Night. Are you excited yet?

For today's trivia party we'll look at the only people to win exactly six Oscars. Four men. It's always men (sigh). Only 11 people have won more Oscars than these four men. I did not include confusing cases like Visual FX guru Dennis Murren -- IMDb argues exactly 6 but that depends on how you count them since his prizes are many and a confusing jumble of technical achievements, special Oscars, and regular competitive statues. (Unfortunately I couldn't find photographs of the set decorators) 

Gordon HollingsheadGORDON Hollingshead (1892-1952)

This producer won more Oscars in the short film categories than anyone other than the legendary Walt Disney and Frederick Quimby (of Tom & Jerry fame) but he won them for live action films. His first Oscar, though, was in the inaguaral year (1933) of a category called "Best Assistant Director" which »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


Best Picture and Better Picture: Movies That Should Have Won the Oscar but Didn’t

19 February 2016 3:34 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 The best picture doesn’t always win Best Picture. Sometimes the best film of the year gets robbed. Cinelinx looks at the movies which should have won Best Picture but didn’t.

Whenever the Best Picture winner is announced at the Oscars, sometimes we say, “Yeah, that deserved to win,” but then again, sometimes we say, “Huh? Are they kidding me?!” There are a lot of backstage politics and extenuating factors in Hollywood that can determine which film wins the big trophy. The worthiest film doesn’t always take the statue home. Going back over the 88-year history of the Academy Awards, we look at which films didn’t really deserve to win and the ones which rightfully should have won.

The Best Pictures and the Better Pictures:

 

1927-8: The Winner-Wings

What should have won: Sunrise (Sunrise was given a special award for Artistic Quality of Production, but it »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


The 10 Best & 10 Worst Follow-Ups To Best Picture Oscar Winners

17 February 2016 12:03 PM, PST | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

Alejandro Gonzalez Inarritu has a chance to make history in about ten days. The Mexican filmmaker is nominated for Best Picture and Best Director at the 88th Academy Awards for “The Revenant,” just twelve months after he won both prizes for “Birdman.” While both races remain wide open, with “The Big Short” and “Spotlight” providing a strong challenge, and George Miller proving to be more than a dark horse in the directing category, there’s a strong possibility that Inarritu could take both for the second year in a row. No director has won an Oscar for Best Director two years in a row since John Ford (for “The Grapes Of Wrath” in 1940 and “How Green Was My Valley” in 1941). No director’s successive films have won Best Picture since David Lean (“The Bridge On The River Kwai” in 1957 and “Lawrence Of Arabia” in 1962). And no filmmaker has pulled off »

- Oliver Lyttelton

Permalink | Report a problem


Oscar Trivia: Facts About the Academy Awards

8 February 2016 8:03 AM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

With the Oscars quickly approaching, here are some fun facts about the Academy Awards throughout the years.

 Oscar Facts:

Q) Which films have won the most academy awards?

A) It was a three-way draw between Ben Hur, Titanic and Lord of Rings: Return of the King at 11 each.

 

Q) Which films have the most Oscar nominations?

A) All About Eve and Titanic are tied for the most nominations, with 14 each.

 

Q) What was the longest film to ever win the Best Picture Oscar?

A) Gone With the Wind at 3 hours and 56 minutes.

 

Q) Which was the shortest Best Picture winner?

A) Marty at 90 minutes.

 

Q) Which sequels have won Best Picture?

A) The Godfather Part 2, and Lord of the Rings: Return of the King.

 

Q) Which movies won best picture but were not nominated for Best Director?

A) Wings (1928), Grand Hotel (1931), Driving Miss Daisy (1989) and Argo (2012)

 

Q) What was the »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

Permalink | Report a problem


The DGA to Iñárritu... Again

7 February 2016 4:43 AM, PST | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Wide open race, people. Following The Big Short's win at PGA, Spotlight's ensemble prize at SAG, comes the Director's Guild Award for... The Revenant.

Getty Images

Bonafide three-way race for Best Picture which is not common. Whoever wins we'll know that it was close -- unless a sweep reveals otherwise. Hell, Oscar's Best Director competition is also fierce though the advantage goes to Iñárritu at this point.

Trivia!

Incidentally, this prize for Alejandro González Iñárritu is his second consecutive from his guild. Though several directors have won twice, a consecutive win has never happened before at the DGA. It has happened at the Oscars, though, and twice at that: John Ford won two in a row for The Grapes of Wrath (1940) and How Green Was My Valley (1941). And not quite a decade later Joseph L Mankiewicz pulled off the same trick with A Letter To Three Wives (1949) and All »

- NATHANIEL R

Permalink | Report a problem


NYC Weekend Watch: Bowie, Shakespeare, Ghibli, ‘How Green Was My Valley’ & More

15 January 2016 8:10 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Film Society of Lincoln Center

In honor of David Bowie, Nagisa Oshima‘s Merry Christmas Mr. Lawrence (on 35mm) and Nicolas Roeg‘s The Man Who Fell to Earth will screen for free on Friday.

Film Forum

“Stratford on Houston” bring the Bard to New York, with Richard III, Welles‘ and Polanski‘s Macbeth, The Taming of the Shrew, »

- Nick Newman

Permalink | Report a problem


Daily | Goings On | Acropolis, Ncfs, Close-Up

13 January 2016 8:42 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

We begin today's roundup of goings on around the world in New York with notes on revivals of Todd Solondz's Welcome to the Dollhouse, Claire Denis's Trouble Every Day, Donald Cammell's White of the Eye, Freddie Francis's Dracula Has Risen from the Grave, Quentin Tarantino's Jackie Brown, John Ford's How Green was My Valley and Jean Eustache's The Mother and the Whore. Plus: Raya Martin and Mark Peranson's La última película and works by Sharon Lockhart, Manoel de Oliveira and Lewis Klahr in Los Angeles, Michael Haneke in London, fresh filmmakers in Switzerland and Hong Kong—and more. » - David Hudson »

Permalink | Report a problem


10 Movie Flops That Became Cult Classics

4 January 2016 11:27 AM, PST | Obsessed with Film | See recent Obsessed with Film news »

Newmarket Films

It’s hard to believe now that Hollywood initially resisted releasing its movies on videocassette. Not only did video make films available to a wider audience, it also gave box office flops a new lease of life.

One of the more notorious examples is Charles E Selliers’s Silent Night Deadly Night (1984), which was picketed by groups that took issue with the depiction of Santa Claus as an axe-wielding rapist with nun issues. The film went toes up at the box office, but the controversy created demand for the title on VHS, where it proved so popular that it spawned sequels and a 2012 remake.

It turns out that there’s only one critic whose opinion matters, and his name is Old Father Time. If a cheap slasher movie can enjoy an afterlife, then the door is open for any flop to seek re-evaluation.

What’s interesting about the following films is that, »

- Ian Watson

Permalink | Report a problem


2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2005

19 items from 2016


IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners