7.6/10
2,788
63 user 15 critic

Hold That Ghost (1941)

Passed | | Adventure, Comedy, Music | 8 August 1941 (USA)
After inheriting a fortune from a gangster, two dim-witted service station attendants find themselves stranded in a haunted house.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay) (as Fred Rinaldo) | 3 more credits »
Reviews

On Disc

at Amazon

1 nomination. See more awards »
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

In the Navy (1941)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Russ Raymond, America's number one crooner, disappears and joins the Navy under the name Tommy Halstead. Dorothy Roberts, a magazine journalist, is intent on finding out what happened to ... See full summary »

Director: Arthur Lubin
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Dick Powell
Who Done It? (1942)
Comedy | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.8/10 X  

Two dumb soda jerks dream of writing radio mysteries. When they try to pitch an idea at a radio station, they end up in the middle of a real murder when the station owner is killed during a broadcast.

Director: Erle C. Kenton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Patric Knowles
Buck Privates (1941)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Musical | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

Bud and Lou enlist in the army in order to escape being hauled off to jail, and soon find themselves in basic training. To their dismay, the company's drill instructor is none other than ... See full summary »

Director: Arthur Lubin
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Lee Bowman
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Music | War
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

When a barnstorming stunt pilot decides to join the air corps, his two goofball assistants decide to go with him. Since the two are Abbott & Costello, the air corps doesn't know what it's in for.

Directors: Arthur Lubin, Ralph Ceder
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Martha Raye
Comedy | Crime | Romance
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

When their captain is swindled out of his riverboat by a trio of gamblers, stage show star Abbott and his bumbling sidekick Costello must put things right.

Director: Jean Yarbrough
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Alan Curtis
Hit the Ice (1943)
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Crime | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.2/10 X  

Two newspaper photographers get mixed up with gangsters at a ski resort.

Directors: Charles Lamont, Erle C. Kenton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Ginny Simms
Comedy | Music
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

Jim "Lucky" Moore (Allan Jones), an insurance salesman, comes up with a novel policy for his friend, Steve (Robert Cummings): a 'love insurance policy', that will pay out $1-million if ... See full summary »

Director: A. Edward Sutherland
Stars: Allan Jones, Nancy Kelly, Robert Cummings
Comedy | Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.5/10 X  

Abbott & Costello search for diamonds in Africa, along the way meeting a visually-impaired gunner, a hungry lion, and a tribe of cannibals...

Director: Charles Barton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Clyde Beatty
Comedy | Horror | Mystery
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Two employees of a secluded hotel investigate a murder on the premises in which the goofy bellboy is the prime suspect.

Director: Charles Barton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Boris Karloff
Comedy | Musical | Adventure
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.6/10 X  

A pair of bus drivers accidentally steal their own bus. With the company issuing a warrant for their arrest, they tag along with a playboy on a boat trip that finds them on a tropical island, where a jewel thief has sinister plans for them.

Director: Erle C. Kenton
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Virginia Bruce
Certificate: Passed Comedy | Horror | Sci-Fi
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7/10 X  

Two bumbling private eyes help a man wrongly accused of murder who has become invisible to help clear his name.

Director: Charles Lamont
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Nancy Guild
Comedy | Western | Musical
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.1/10 X  

Two peanut vendors at a rodeo show get in trouble with their boss and hide out on a railroad train heading west. They get jobs as cowboys on a dude ranch, despite the fact that neither of ... See full summary »

Director: Arthur Lubin
Stars: Bud Abbott, Lou Costello, Dick Foran
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
...
...
...
...
Gregory
...
...
Charlie Smith
...
Soda Jerk
...
Bannister
...
Moose Matson (as William Davidson)
...
...
The Andrews Sisters
Edit

Storyline

Two bumbling service station attendants are left as the sole beneficiaries in a gangster's will. Their trip to claim their fortune is sidetracked when they are stranded in a haunted house along with several other strangers. Written by Daniel Bubbeo <dbubbeo@cmp.com>

Plot Summary | Plot Synopsis

Taglines:

THOSE FUNATICS ARE HERE AGAIN! Your blues won't stand a ghost of a chance! (original ad) See more »


Certificate:

Passed | See all certifications »

Parents Guide:

 »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

8 August 1941 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Don't Look Now  »

Edit

Box Office

Budget:

$190,000 (estimated)
See more on IMDbPro »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show more on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

This film went into production under the title "Oh Charlie!" as Bud Abbott and Lou Costello's second feature film and follow-up to their wildly successful Buck Privates (1941). Production was completed in February 1941 just as "Buck Privates" was breaking box office records across the country, and Universal was worried that the new scare comedy had no real connection to the first hit (preview audiences reportedly asked where The Andrews Sisters were). A nervous studio decided to shelve "Oh Charlie!" and rework it at a future date and concentrated instead on pushing a new service comedy, In the Navy (1941), through production as the team's next feature. Upon completion of "In the Navy," this film went back into production in May 1941 as "Hold That Ghost" with the addition of the opening and closing nightclub scenes (which added Mischa Auer, Ted Lewis, The Andrews Sisters and musical numbers to the proceedings). The new scenes required a rewriting and reworking of the existing footage. Joan Davis, who had by that time reported to 20th Century-Fox for a role in Sun Valley Serenade (1941), was unavailable for the re-shoots and had to be written out of the new scenes (including the new nightclub finale). See more »

Goofs

When Moose Matson pulls up to the gas station that Chuck and Ferdie work at, his front license plate is of a white color. But when the police are chasing him in the same car, the license plate is clearly black. See more »

Quotes

Camille: Are you a married man?
Ferdie: No.
Camille: Neither am I.
[to Chuck]
Camille: He's old enough, isn't he?
Ferdie: Oh sure I'm old enough, I play games, I play post office.
Camille: Post office? That's a kids' game.
Ferdie: Not the way I play.
See more »

Crazy Credits

Although the Andrews Sisters are credited onscreen only as a group, Ted Lewis (I) identifies each of them orally. See more »

Connections

Referenced in The Colgate Comedy Hour: Episode #1.27 (1951) See more »

Soundtracks

Sleepy Serenade
(1941) (uncredited)
Music by Lou Singer
Lyrics by Mort Greene
Played by Ted Lewis and His Orchestra (as Ted Lewis' Orchestra) and sung by The Andrews Sisters at the nightclub
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Beautifully Produced and Sustained Abbot &Costello Comedy Classic
26 July 2005 | by See all my reviews

This durable comedy is a favorite of Abbot and Costello fans for many reasons. it is their first non-service comedy, their first involving spooks, monsters or hauntings and their first with a strong supporting cast and "A" production values. The story-line involves Bud and Lou inheriting a haunted house from a gangster named Moose. Since the crook's loot is supposed to be hidden there--it comes complete with ghosts, a bad reputation and cryptic clues--their trip there to take possession of their property proves to be a very lively adventure.Before this portion of the narrative, there is quite a bit of fun in a nightclub, involving the Andrews Sisters, a curious "Me and My Shadow" Number with legendary Ted Lewis and a truly black partner, the Ted lewis orchestra and much more. The other passengers along for the fun ride to the new property include Richard Carlson, very good as a science specialist incredibly oblivious to the admiration and the extreme physical charms of Evelyn Ankers, hilarious Joan Davis as a perfect foil for the lead duo and the others, plus durable bad guy Marc Lawrence, hilarious Mischa Auer, Shemp Howard, Russell Hicks as the gangster's lawyer and William Davidson as Moose Matson the gangster. Look for familiar faces among the gangsters and in the nightclub scenes. The direction of this film by skilled Arthur Lubin and the screenplay by Robert Lees, Fred Rinaldo and John Grant keeps the gags coming and the pace moving. The remarkable aspect of the film is that its musical numbers and sight-gags do not impede the progress of the plot. I had never seen this film until last year; so its freshness and the luminous results of its production team were a major discovery for me. The cinematography was done by Elwood Bredell, art direction by Jack Otterson with the set decoration by the famous Russell A. Gausman, and are all outstanding achievements. The costumes by Vera West are fine and thanks to the nightclub scenes unusually varied. This B/W classic would undoubtedly have been an expensive color production later on; but in any case, the money is found, the mystery is solved, the ghosts are mostly explained, lovers are united and the laughs generated by this delightful entertainment remain in the mind--as I and other viewers of this very funny film have testified-for years to come. Not to be missed.


14 of 16 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?
Review this title | See all 63 user reviews »

Contribute to This Page

Paul Scheer on Why There Are No Bad Movies

Paul Scheer discusses The Disaster Artist and his love of awesomely bad movies. Plus, we dive into the origins of midnight movies and explore how The Room became a cult classic.

Watch now