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The Great Commandment (1939)

The Great Commandment is a Christian film directed by Irving Pichel, which portrays the conversion to Christianity of a young Zealot, Joel, and the Roman soldier Longinus through the ... See full summary »

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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Joel
Maurice Moscovitch ...
Lamech (as Maurice Moscovich)
...
Marjorie Cooley ...
Tamar
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Jemuel
...
...
Tax collector
Olaf Hytten ...
Anthony Marlowe ...
Singer
Lester Sharpe ...
First Zealot (as Lester Scharff)
Marc Loebell ...
Judas (as Marc Lobell)
Harold Minjir ...
Earl Gunn ...
Wounded Man
Albert Spehr ...
Second Zealot
...
Merchant
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Storyline

The Great Commandment is a Christian film directed by Irving Pichel, which portrays the conversion to Christianity of a young Zealot, Joel, and the Roman soldier Longinus through the teachings of Jesus in his Parable of the Good Samaritan. It was co-produced by Rev. James K. Friedrich and released by Cathedral Films in 1939. Its theatrical release was in 1941 by Twentieth Century Fox. Written by Bob Renner

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10 April 1941 (Mexico)  »

Also Known As:

A Sombra da Cruz  »

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$130,000 (estimated)
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(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

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1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Rev. James K. Friedrich produced this picture in order to portray a "correct" version of the crucifixion. After PCA censor Joseph I. Breen voiced concerns about the onscreen representation of Jesus, producer John T. Coyle decided to eliminate Jesus as an onscreen character and to use the camera's point of view to represent him instead. The picture was not released nationally until 1941, but had its previews in Joplin, MO, and at the Ambassdor Theater in Los Angeles on 2 Oct. 1939 See more »

Connections

Followed by Family Theatre: I Beheld His Glory (1953) See more »

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THE GREAT COMMANDMENT (Irving Pichel, 1939) **1/2
9 March 2008 | by (Naxxar, Malta) – See all my reviews

The oldest, yet longest, of the four religious films commissioned by various Christian groups that I watched (I opted not to go through too much 'straight' stuff while waiting for the result of the General Elections over here!) actually had the backing of one of the Hollywood majors – Twentieth Century Fox. The familiar events of The Passion are played out as a backdrop to the main narrative – that involving a couple of zealot brothers who clash over their mission (the impulsive younger sibling wants to act now while the more practical older one, played by John Beal, wants to wait for the arrival of The Messiah); the latter also falls out with his father because he has in mind for him to become a scholar while marrying off Beal's sweetheart to his brother! Eventually, he sets out to find Jesus and offer him his sword of allegiance – but he slowly comes to understand his message of Peace and Love. Also involved is a Roman officer, well played by Albert Dekker: as it turns out, Beal's brother winds up dead after an attempt on Dekker's life (who is crippling the Jews with taxes, gathered by the "snivelling" and typically slimy Ian Wolfe); however, Beal – inspired by his new faith – takes care of the wounded Dekker who, noticing the Jews' confusion and anger at Beal for his conduct, decides to lock him up. During his tenure in jail, it transpires that Christ was tried, convicted and crucified; still baffled by Beal's behavior, Dekker asks him to explain – the catch is that the person who 'converted' Beal towards helping even his enemies turns out to be the very same one in whose side Dekker had just driven the proverbial spear!


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