Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1941) - News Poster

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Duel in the Sun

David O. Selznick’s absurdly over-cooked western epic is a great picture, even if much of it induces a kind of hypnotic, mouth-hanging-open disbelief. Is this monument to the sex appeal of Jennifer Jones, Kitsch in terrible taste, or have Selznick and his army of Hollywood talents found a new level of hyped melodramatic harmony? It certainly has the star-power, beginning with Gregory Peck as a cowboy rapist who learned his bedside manners from Popeye’s Bluto. It’s all hugely enjoyable.

Duel in the Sun

Blu-ray

Kl Studio Classics

1946 / Color / 1:37 flat Academy / 144 min. / Special Edition / Street Date August 15, 2017 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95

Starring Jennifer Jones, Gregory Peck, Joseph Cotten, Lionel Barrymore, Lillian Gish, Walter Huston, Butterfly McQueen, Charles Bickford, Tilly Losch.

Cinematography Lee Garmes, Ray Rennahan and Harold Rosson

Production Designer J. McMillan Johnson

Film Editor Hal C. Kern, John Saure and William H. Ziegler

Original Music Dimitri Tiomkin

Written by Niven Busch,
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Will Aladdin and Emma Share the Same Fate in 'Once Upon a Time?'

  • BuddyTV
Will Aladdin and Emma Share the Same Fate in 'Once Upon a Time?'
Storybrooke is being flooded with untold stories during season 6 of Once Upon a Time. So far, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, the Count of Monte Cristo, and Jasmine have all made an appearance. Episode 5, "Street Rats," was about Aladdin and how he became a savior. Now that Aladdin has revealed himself, could this be the end of Aladdin and Jasmine's story? Or will Aladdin play a big role in Emma's story?
See full article at BuddyTV »

Fury (1936)

Savant uncovers the true, hidden ending to this Fritz Lang masterpiece. The moral outrage of Lang's searing attack on lynch terror hasn't dimmed a bit -- with his first American picture the director nails one of our primary social evils. MGM imposed some re-cutting and re-shooting, but it's still the most emotionally powerful film on the subject. Fury DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1936 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 92 min. / Street Date August 2, 2016, 2016 / available through the WB Shop / 17.99 Starring Sylvia Sidney, Spencer Tracy, Walter Abel, Bruce Cabot, Edward Ellis, Walter Brennan, Frank Albertson, George Walcott, Arthur Stone, Morgan Wallace, George Chandler, Roger Gray, Edwin Maxwell, Howard C. Hickman, Jonathan Hale, Leila Bennett, Esther Dale, Helen Flint. Cinematography Joseph Ruttenberg Film Editor Frank Sullivan Original Music Franz Waxman Written by Bartlett Cormack, Fritz Lang story by Norman Krasna Produced by Joseph L. Mankiewicz Directed by Fritz Lang

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

Just
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Final Years of King Baggot – From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Wednesday September 28th at 7pm at Lee Auditorium inside the Missouri History Museum (Lindell and DeBaliviere in Forest Park, St. Louis, Missouri). The 1913 silent film Ivanhoe will be accompanied by The Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra and there will be a 40-minute illustrated lecture on the life and career of King Baggot by We Are Movie Geeks’ Tom Stockman. A Facebook invite for the event can be found Here

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot was at one time Hollywood’s most popular star, known is his heyday as “The Most Photographed Man in the World” and “More Famous Than the Man in the Moon”. Yet even in his hometown, Baggot had faded into obscurity.
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

ITV's Jekyll and Hyde: Family fantasy or too creepy for kids?

ITV got back into the 'teatime adventure series' game tonight, launching a new competitor to the BBC's Doctor Who with a fast-paced, flashy take on Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde.

Jekyll and Hyde - from writer Charlie Higson - casts Tom Bateman as Robert Jekyll, who like his grandfather Henry has a monstrous alter ego.

But this Hyde is a departure from the grotesque figures we've seen in other films and series. He's a wild and powerful beast, but with a certain unhinged charm.

The first episode of Jekyll and Hyde - also starring Natalie Gumede and Richard E Grant - took in deformed villains, shape-shifters, shadowy conspiracies, romance and one epic bar brawl.

But does ITV have a hit on their hands? Could Higson's reinvention run and run? Or did this revamp of a horror classic leave you cold?

Digital Spy wants to hear your thoughts. Is this perfect
See full article at Digital Spy - TV news »

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms
Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” lead this year’s 41st Annual Saturn Awards nominations with 11 and 10, respectively, the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announced on Tuesday.

Marvel’s summer box office smash “Guardians of the Galaxy” followed close behind with nine nominations. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” followed with eight, and “Edge of Tomorrow” and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” grabbed seven apiece.

Two of last year’s big television winners, “The Walking Dead” and “Hannibal,” lead the 2015 smallscreen noms with seven and six, respectively. “Continuum,” which airs on the Syfy channel and averages less than 1 million viewers, is the next most nominated show with four.

This year’s Saturn noms exemplify the eclectic groupings that have come to distinguish the awards. The fantasy film category, for example, includes “Birdman,” “The Grand
See full article at Variety - TV News »

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms

‘Captain America: The Winter Soldier’ and ‘Interstellar’ Lead Saturn Awards Noms
Anthony and Joe Russo’s “Captain America: The Winter Soldier” and Christopher Nolan’s “Interstellar” lead this year’s 41st Annual Saturn Awards nominations with 11 and 10, respectively, the Academy of Science Fiction, Fantasy and Horror Films announced on Tuesday.

Marvel’s summer box office smash “Guardians of the Galaxy” followed close behind with nine nominations. “Dawn of the Planet of the Apes” followed with eight, and “Edge of Tomorrow” and “The Hobbit: The Battle of the Five Armies” grabbed seven apiece.

Two of last year’s big television winners, “The Walking Dead” and “Hannibal,” lead the 2015 smallscreen noms with seven and six, respectively. “Continuum,” which airs on the Syfy channel and averages less than 1 million viewers, is the next most nominated show with four.

This year’s Saturn noms exemplify the eclectic groupings that have come to distinguish the awards. The fantasy film category, for example, includes “Birdman,” “The Grand
See full article at Variety - Film News »

From the ‘King of the Movies’ to Bit Player – the Final Years of King Baggot

The King Baggot Tribute will take place Friday, November 14th at Webster University’s Moore Auditorium beginning at 7pm as part of this year’s St. Louis Intenational FIlm Festival. The program will consist a rare 35mm screening of the 1913 epic Ivanhoe starring King Baggot with live music accompaniment by the Rats and People Motion Picture Orchestra. Ivanhoe will be followed by an illustrated lecture on the life and films of King Baggot presented by Tom Stockman, editor here at We Are Movie Geeks. After that will screen the influential silent western Tumbleweeds (1925), considered to be one of King Baggot’s finest achievements as a director. Tumbleweeds will feature live piano accompaniment by Matt Pace.

Here’s a look at the final phase of King Baggot’s career.

King Baggot, the first ‘King of the Movies’ died July 11th, 1948 penniless and mostly forgotten at age 68. A St. Louis native, Baggot
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

"Adieu au langage" - "Goodbye to Language": A Works Cited

  • MUBI
Adieu au langage - Goodbye to Language

A Works Cited

Introduction

From its bluntly political opening (Alfredo Bandelli's 'La caccia alle streghe': "Always united we win, long live the revolution!") to its hilarious fecal humor and word play—with 3D staging that happily puts to shame James Cameron and every other hack who's tried their hand at it these past several years—Adieu au langage overwhelms us with a deluge of recited texts, music and images, hardly ever bothering to slow down to let us catch our breath. Exhilarating and certainly not surprising—this is the guy who made Puissance de la parole after all!

The release of a new Godard film or video means a new encounter with texts, films and music often familiar from the filmmaker's earlier work—reworked and re-contextualized—as well as new discoveries to be sorted through and identified. This life-long interest in quotation
See full article at MUBI »

If We Had Oscar Ballots... a 1941 Extra

Tomorrow when the Supporting Actress Smackdown 1941 hits, we'll just be discussing the five nominees (24 more hours to get your ballots in for the reader's section of the vote!). As it should be. But for the first time in a Smackdown I polled my fellow panelists as to who they would have nominated if, uh, they'd have been alive in 1941 and if, uh, they'd been AMPAS members.

Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde lust after Lana Turner & Ingrid Bergman. And so does our panel.

Angelica and I didn't vote (I haven't seen enough 1941 pictures, I confess) but our other three panelists have recommendations for you outside the Oscar shortlist. In fact, all three of them only co-signed 2 of Oscar's 5 choices... different ones mostly so the Smackdown should be interesting (I'm not telling you which as the critiques come tomorrow!). So here are some For Your Considerations for your rental queues or your
See full article at FilmExperience »

Godzilla, Giant Ants, and Other Monsters - and Mickey Rooney: May '14 at LoC's Packard

Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, Giant Ants, Fascists, and rarely seen ‘Musty Stuffer’: Eclectic Packard Theater movies in May 2014 (photo: ‘Godzilla’) Godzilla 1954, Mickey Rooney, military fascists, deadly giant ants, racing car drivers, and The Mishaps of Musty Suffer, a super-rare slapstick comedy series from the 1910s, are a few of the highlights at the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater in May 2014. Godzilla 1954 and fellow movie monsters Gareth Edwards’ Godzilla 2014, starring Aaron Taylor-Johnson, Elizabeth Olsen, Juliette Binoche, Ken Watanabe, and Bryan Cranston, opens on May 16 in much of the world. On May 8 at the Packard Theater, you’ll get the chance to check out Ishiro Honda’s Godzilla 1954 aka Gojira — in the original, Toho-released, Japanese-language version (i.e., without Raymond Burr). As part of its Godzilla double bill, the Packard Theater will also present Motoyoshi Oda’s Gigantis, the Fire Monster aka Godzilla Raids Again (1955). Besides Godzilla, the Packard Theater will
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rooney Was No Andy Hardy in Real Life: Longest Film Career Ever?

Mickey Rooney dead at 93: Four-time Oscar nominee, frequent Judy Garland co-star may have had the longest film career ever (photo: Mickey Rooney ca. 1940) Mickey Rooney, four-time Academy Award nominee and one of the biggest domestic box-office draws during the studio era, died of "natural causes" on Sunday, April 6, 2014, at his home in the Los Angeles suburb of North Hollywood. The Brooklyn-born Rooney (as Joseph Yule Jr., on September 23, 1920) had reportedly been in ill health for some time. He was 93. Besides his countless movies, and numerous television and stage appearances, Mickey Rooney was also known for his stormy private life, which featured boozing and gambling, some widely publicized family infighting (including his testifying in Congress in 2011 about elder abuse), his filing for bankruptcy in 1962 after having earned a reported $12 million (and then going bankrupt again in 1996), his eight marriages — including those to actresses Ava Gardner, Martha Vickers, and Barbara Ann Thomason
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Mickey Rooney Dead At 93

Hollywood legend Mickey Rooney has died at his Los Angeles home. He was 93. With a remarkable career that spanned 10 decades, Mickey Rooney was one of the last surviving artists to have witnessed the evolution of film – from his first onscreen role in the 1926 silent film Not To Be Trusted, to his appearance in 2011′s The Muppets, and beyond.

After first taking to the stage at the age of 15 months, as part of his parents’ Vaudeville act, Joseph Yule Jr. soon progressed to child stardom – appearing in almost 80 silent comedy shorts as the comic strip character, Mickey McGuire. It was this character that would provide the star’s new name, as his mother decided a change was needed. Joseph Yule Jr. became Mickey Rooney, and signed with MGM in 1934 – soon taking to the screen alongside legends such as Clark Gable and Spencer Tracy.

A Family Affair in 1937 – based on the Broadway
See full article at We Got This Covered »

Top 11 Cinematic Experiments Gone Wrong

"The road to hell is paved with good intentions." Truer words were never spoken. So when someone decides to construct a body from cadaver parts and reanimate it with a lightning bolt, or surgically connect three people with one gastroenterological tract, they always hope for the best. Unfortunately, that's not usually the result.

Which leads us to our latest list of the best and the brightest. In honor of the DVD/Blu-ray release of The Apparition on November 27th, we bring out our list of Top 11 films featuring Experiments Gone Wrong.

As always, we've got to give a shout out to a few honorable mentions. Who would think that things would go wrong with keeping a cryogenically frozen Jason Voorhees, as in Jason X? Surprisingly, things went bad there. The splicing of DNA from different animals sounds like a brilliant idea, no? Splice proved that was a wonky idea as well.
See full article at Dread Central »

Cinema Paradiso Finale: Valentine's Day Movie Montage

Anna Magnani in (what looks like) Luchino Visconti's Bellissima At the end of Giuseppe Tornatore's Best Foreign Language Film Oscar winner Cinema Paradiso, small-town projectionist Philippe Noiret has died and the Nuovo Cinema Paradiso has become a pile of rubble. The bratty Italian boy Salvatore Cascio has grown into the classy Frenchman Jacques Perrin (like Noiret, dubbed in Italian), a filmmaker who sits to watch a mysterious reel of film the deceased projectionist had left him. It turns out the reel contains clips from films censored by the prudish local parish priest, whose family values found kisses, embraces, and bare breasts and legs a danger to society. Now, who's doing all that kissing, embracing, and breast/leg-displaying in that film reel? (Please scroll down for the Cinema Paradiso clip.) Here are the ones I recognize: Silvana Mangano and Vittorio Gassman in Giuseppe De Santis' Bitter Rice (1949); Mangano
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Curio: Ingrid Bergman, 1945 Cover Girl

Alexa here. I was inspired by Jose's post on birthday girl Ingrid Bergman to share this vintage Motion Picture magazine of mine from 1945. Ingrid graces the cover, promoting her latest effort in Spellbound, just shy of her 30th birthday.

The interview inside, from the set of Alfred Hitchcock's film, was written in breathless prose by "famous movie reporter" Sidney Skolsky. (A little trivia: Sidney coined the name "Oscar" for the Academy Award.) Here are some gems from his piece:Ingrid Bergman, on the screen, looks like what an actress should look like. Even more so than the Turners, the Grables, the Fayes. Yet, in everyday life, it is common knowledge that many, even fans, pass her by without recognizing her. She uses almost no makeup at all, except a little lipstick and a slight dab of powder.

She will do practically anything to cooperate except pose for cheesecake art.
See full article at FilmExperience »

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