MOVIEmeter
SEE RANK
Down 40,660 this week

Dance Hall (1941)

6.8
Your rating:
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 -/10 X  
Ratings: 6.8/10 from 31 users  
Reviews: 3 user

Singer Lili Brown is attracted to dance hall manager Duke till she realizes he does that to all the girls. Nice guy Duke sets her up with composer Joe Brooks.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay), 1 more credit »
0Check in
0Share...

User Lists

Related lists from IMDb users

a list of 3802 titles
created 13 Apr 2012
 
a list of 871 titles
created 13 Apr 2012
 
a list of 2767 titles
created 13 Apr 2012
 
a list of 32 titles
created 02 Nov 2013
 
list image
a list of 9997 titles
created 26 Nov 2013
 

Related Items

Search for "Dance Hall" on Amazon.com

Connect with IMDb


Share this Rating

Title: Dance Hall (1941)

Dance Hall (1941) on IMDb 6.8/10

Want to share IMDb's rating on your own site? Use the HTML below.

Take The Quiz!

Test your knowledge of Dance Hall.
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Lily Brown
...
Duke McKay
William Henry ...
Joe Brooks
June Storey ...
Ada
J. Edward Bromberg ...
Max Brandon
Charles Halton ...
Mr. Frederick Newmeyer
Shimen Ruskin ...
Charles 'Limpy' Larkin
William Haade ...
Moon
Trudi Marsdon ...
Vivian
Russ Clark ...
Cook
Frank Fanning ...
Turnkey
Edit

Storyline

Singer Lili Brown is attracted to dance hall manager Duke till she realizes he does that to all the girls. Nice guy Duke sets her up with composer Joe Brooks.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

singer | based on novel | See All (2) »

Taglines:

BEAUTIFUL...but not dumb! She taught this dance-hall king a new technique in love!


Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

8 March 1943 (Portugal)  »

Also Known As:

Estrela do Cabaret  »

Company Credits

Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Soundtracks

Bridal Chorus
(uncredited)
From "Lohengrin"
Music by Richard Wagner
Played by the band at the dance hall
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
A Solid Slice of Early 40s America!
27 January 2007 | by (United States) – See all my reviews

This is a terrific film. No masterpiece of film making, just lots of entertainment value and fun.

Sharpie dude Cesar Romero is the manager of a dance hall in an amusement park in Pennsylvania back in 1941. He drives a snazzy convertible car and spends the rest of his time punching out troublemakers at the dance hall, dancing and flirting with pretty girls to big Swing bands and gambling with his buddies. What a great life! Into the dance hall one night walks delicious singer Carole Landis. Romero is hooked from the moment he sees her.

Romero's nice guy buddy Joe plays the piano and leads the band at the dance hall with Romero keeping an eye out for his welfare in life. In the meantime, Joe has eyes for the cutie pie waitress in the restaurant of the hotel that everyone there seems to live in.

Landis begins her gig at the dance hall with a nice dissolve from her rehearsing one afternoon with Joe at the piano with her wearing ordinary street clothes to a sweet crane shot of her in a glamorous gown standing in front of a big band playing a Glenn Miller style ballad. All the boys and men in the house go gaa gaa over her as they ogle her while she sings "There's Something In the Air".

Landis keeps resisting Romero's advances and winds up walking home one evening along a country road after she and Romero have had a spat. Along comes nice guy Max and gives her a ride back to town. He's smitten, too.

The rest of the film revolves around more of the same plot and the picture is about as entertaining a "B" film as you could ever hope to see.

Lots of fine music from the beginning with the band playing some generic Swing number as crowds of people swarm into the dance hall.

There are any number of 'plug tunes' from other 20th Century-Fox pictures of the moment, as well as some nice Lindy Hopping by noted dancers Dean Collins and Jewel McGowan in what may be their only speaking roles on film - "Shoot the torso to me, Toots!" and "What are you, a chiropractor, anyway?" Immortality!

For what this film is and it's total lack of pretension, I rate it a nine out of ten.

If you enjoyed the Glenn Miller film ORCHESTRA WIVES (which featured both Romero and Landis, btw), you will likely enjoy DANCE HALL, too, for they both have that very mellow early 1940s ambiance of an America now long vanished.


4 of 4 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Message Boards

Discuss Dance Hall (1941) on the IMDb message boards »

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?