Citizen Kane
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 21 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Did Ryan Reynolds Leak the 'Deadpool' Test Footage?

5 hours ago | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

If you've been following the long and twisting road Deadpool took to land in theaters this Friday, then you surely know that the only reason it got a green light at 20th Century Fox is because of leaked test footage that showed off one of the movie's key action sequences. While the mostly CGI'd viral video was a big step in getting the movie made, no one associated with it will reveal who actually leaked the footage. Ryan Reynolds has long stated that he had nothing to do with it. But now he's changing his stance.

Deadpool is poised to have a gargantuan box office weekend. And it might even become the highest February opening in history, along with the biggest opening for an R rated movie ever. But in the early days, Fox just wasn't so sure about an extremely graphic and violent superhero movie. Especially after X-Men Origins: Wolverine »

- MovieWeb

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'Taxi Driver': 25 Things You (Probably) Didn't Know About Martin Scorsese's Classic

5 February 2016 7:00 AM, PST | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

"You talkin' to me?"

It's the 40th anniversary of "Taxi Driver" (released on February 8, 1976), the movie that gave Robert De Niro his most famous line, put Martin Scorsese on the map, proved that the pre-teen Jodie Foster was an Oscar-worthy thespian, and (most notoriously) was cited by John Hinckley as an inspiration for his assassination attempt on President Ronald Reagan.

In honor of the film's anniversary, here are 25 things you need to know about how Travis Bickle came to be.

1. The script, by Paul Schrader (pictured, left), was semi-autobiographical. After a divorce and a break-up with a girlfriend, he wrote the movie while living in his car, feeling suicidal, obsessing about guns and pornography, and having spoken to no one for weeks. As he recalled in 2013, "Taxi Driver" was "an exorcism through art," and it worked.

2. Martin Scorsese saw the script as early as 1972, but didn't yet have the clout to make it, »

- Gary Susman

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Box Office Democracy: Kung Fu Panda 3

4 February 2016 3:00 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

I had no interest in seeing either of the first two Kung Fu Panda movies. I thought they were a place for a brand of Jack Black shtick that I had grown tired of by the time 2008 got here (for the record: peak Jack Black was 2003’s School of Rock). I had a strong idea of what these movies were, and I didn’t want anything to do with it. As far as Kung Fu Panda 3 is concerned, I was wrong. This is a charming movie, a funny movie, sometimes even a touching movie. I regretted nothing about my time spent watching Kung Fu Panda 3, and it’s the first movie of 2016 to make me feel that way.

Kung Fu Panda 3 tells a story I was happy to hear told. Po (Black) is told he needs to start teaching the rest of his action team (voiced by »

- Arthur Tebbel

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Rediscovery: Orson Welles’ Too Much Johnson

31 January 2016 6:15 AM, PST | Keyframe | See recent Keyframe news »

The record shows Orson Welles as a grand artist of serious subjects and baroque tastes. That alone is reason enough to hail the discovery, restoration and presentation of the long-thought-lost Too Much Johnson, a tribute to the silent slapstick shorts of Mack Sennett, Charlie Chaplin and Harold Lloyd. It is an unfinished project in its own right but is nonetheless complete enough to reveal a side of Welles so rarely exhibited to the public. That it was made three years before Citizen Kane makes it an invaluable find, a glimpse of the artist exploring the new medium of film with a natural affinity for the possibilities inherent in cinema. But that's a matter of historical scholarship. What matters to the rest of us is that Too Much Johnson is funny, clever, cheeky, inventive and genuinely accomplished, which makes it worth watching on its own modest yet playful merits.>> - Sean »

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Sundance: The Math Behind Fox Searchlight’s Record-Shattering ‘Birth of a Nation’ Deal

27 January 2016 4:36 PM, PST | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Nate Parker may be racking up the airline miles to promote “The Birth of a Nation.” The director and star behind the slave revolt drama has told Fox Searchlight that after spending seven years of his life bringing the story of Nat Turner to the screen, he’s going to be the face and voice of his passion project.

According to insiders, Parker’s deep connection to the material and his willingness to go door-to-door to promote the picture were major reasons that “The Birth of a Nation” landed the biggest deal in the history of the Sundance Film Festival: a $17.5 million payday from Fox Searchlight for global rights.

Parker’s story, and his multi-hypenate status, is expected to be a key component in the marketing outreach of the film. With the possible exception of Orson Welles in “Citizen Kane” or Warren Beatty in “Reds,” few have managed to successfully write, »

- Brent Lang and Ramin Setoodeh

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‘Amy’ and ‘What Happened, Miss Simone?’ Join Long List of Music-Related Docs Nominated for Oscars

22 January 2016 6:00 AM, PST | Scott Feinberg | See recent Scott Feinberg news »

By Patrick Shanley

Managing Editor

This year’s best documentary feature nominees continues a long trend of music docs being recognized by the Academy, as two music-related films have earned nominations at this year’s Oscars.

Amy, which tells the story of late songstress Amy Winehouse in her own words through never-before-seen archival footage and unreleased tracks and is nominated for best doc this year, earned nominations for the Queer Palm and Golden Eye awards at the 2015 Cannes Film Festival for director Asif Kapadia.

Filmmaker Liz Garbus earned the second nomination of her career with the Netflix documentary, What Happened, Miss Simone? The film focuses on the life of iconic R&B singer Nina Simone and her life as a singer, mother, and civil rights activist. Garbus earned her first Oscar nomination in 1998 for her documentary The Farm: Angola, USA.

Music-related docs have been a hot topic for the Academy in years past, »

- Patrick Shanley

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Aton Soumache talks 'The Little Prince', new films and building a European animation mini-major

20 January 2016 4:17 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Aton Soumache, producer of Mark Osborne’s global hit The Little Prince, talks about bringing the French classic to the big screen and his ambitions for Paris-based mini-major On Entertainment.

Producers Aton Soumache and Dimitri Rassam of On Entertainment received Unifrance’s French Cinema Award at its annual Rendez-vous in Paris over the weekend in recognition of the global success of their recent production, Mark Osborne’s The Little Prince.

The $57m production has drawn more than 15 million spectators worldwide since its release last July, making it the most successful French-produced feature-length animation of all time, and has still to hit screens in the Us, where Paramount Pictures has set a March 18 launch. UK and Canada releases are due around the same time.

When Soumache and Rassam first approached Osborne about directing an animation adaptation of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic novella, the Kung Fu Panda director turned them down. The pair had »

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DVD of the Week: Hiroshima Mon Amour

19 January 2016 11:24 AM, PST | CineVue | See recent CineVue news »

★★★★★ The opening shot of Alain Resnais' Hiroshima Mon Amour observes the entwined limbs of two lovers as ash settles on their skin before the image dissolves into those same bodies beaded with sweat. The ash, of course, suggests the nuclear fallout of the atomic bombing of the titular city in August of 1945 eliding time as it falls onto Emmanuelle Riva and Eiji Okada some fourteen years later. Resnais had a preoccupation with time throughout his career - his next feature Last Year at Marienbad would step outside of it almost almost entirely - and Hiroshima Mon Amour drifts backwards and forwards through it to groundbreaking expressive effect. When challenged that such non-linear narrative techniques had been employed before, as in Citizen Kane, Resnais argued "yes, but in my film time is shattered."

»

- CineVue UK

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Why Banning and Cutting Films is a Mistake

17 January 2016 5:40 AM, PST | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

This week, Neil Calloway argues that far from increasing revenues in conservative countries, by allowing censored versions of their movies to be shown, Hollywood will ultimately lose out…

This week brought the news that transgender period drama The Danish Girl has been banned in Qatar. I doubt Working Title will be too upset that their film isn’t being shown in a small, conservative country of about two million people (roughly a quarter of the population of New York City or London), and if I made a film that had been banned due to its apparent “moral depravity” I’d put that quote on the poster, but as studios look to expand their international box office, you can expect this to increasingly become an issue with films.

Banning films in their entirety rarely happens in the West now, but the occasional film does get stopped from being released – in 2015, the »

- Neil Calloway

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Wolves of Wall Street: 'Billions,' 'The Big Short,' and the New Gilded Age

14 January 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

In the fourth episode of Showtime's new series, "Billions," hedge fund manager Bobby "Axe" Axelrod (Damian Lewis) is compared to kings, nation-states, and God Himself, but none strikes so disheartening a note as the one to Charles Foster Kane. Orson Welles' tragic hero, first introduced to Axelrod by a flirtatious songstress in Québec City, of all places, soon becomes something of an abortive obsession for the darkly charismatic capitalist. Though he arranges for a 35mm print to be projected in his private screening room, "Rosebud" remains out of reach, the film subject to constant intrusions by the Wall Street squawk box of shorts, squeezes, and the SEC. Axelrod is, in this sense, not unlike "Billions" itself: drawn to the symbols of the denatured American Dream—as potent today as they were upon the release of "Citizen Kane" in 1941—but unwilling, or unable, to see the attraction through. Though Andrew Sarris. »

- Matt Brennan

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Wolves of Wall Street: 'Billions,' 'The Big Short,' and the New Gilded Age

14 January 2016 11:00 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

In the fourth episode of Showtime's new series, "Billions," hedge fund manager Bobby "Axe" Axelrod (Damian Lewis) is compared to kings, nation-states, and God Himself, but none strikes so disheartening a note as the one to Charles Foster Kane. Orson Welles' tragic hero, first introduced to Axelrod by a flirtatious songstress in Québec City, of all places, soon becomes something of an abortive obsession for the darkly charismatic capitalist. Though he arranges for a 35mm print to be projected in his private screening room, "Rosebud" remains out of reach, the film subject to constant intrusions by the Wall Street squawk box of shorts, squeezes, and the SEC. Axelrod is, in this sense, not unlike "Billions" itself: drawn to the symbols of the denatured American Dream—as potent today as they were upon the release of "Citizen Kane" in 1941—but unwilling, or unable, to see the attraction through. Though Andrew Sarris. »

- Matt Brennan

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ComicMix Six: Box Office Democracy’s Bottom 6 Movies of 2015

13 January 2016 3:03 AM, PST | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

As much as I loved my top 6 movies, I loathe these movies. The competition for worst movie of 2015 was so fierce I had to leave off The Last Witch Hunter, a movie so bad it made me dislike Vin Diesel, Hollywood’s most perfect man. That said, none of these movie are even close to as bad as that wretched animated Oz sequel from 2014, I won’t even name that movie for fear that the parade of angry Kickstarter backers will find me again.  

Fantastic Four – There are a lot of good reasons to make a movie that costs $120 million but it’s quite apparent that spite isn’t one of them. Fantastic Four is a movie that only exists so Fox retains the rights to the franchise presumably so they can sell them back to Marvel for some insane price, because they clearly have no interest in making a good movie. »

- Arthur Tebbel

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75 years ago today, William Randolph Hearst forbid ‘Citizen Kane’ ads

8 January 2016 8:00 AM, PST | Hitfix | See recent Hitfix news »

It was 75 years ago today that newspaper tycoon William Randolph Hearst forbid his newspapers to run ads for “Citizen Kane.” “Citizen Kane” has been declared the greatest film of all time more than any other movie, but at the time of its release, it struggled at the box office. The film garnered more acclaim gradually over the years. Its difficulty getting into theaters and breaking even is often pinned on Hearst, who refused to let any of his wide network of newspapers advertise or review the movie clearly based on his own life. Hearst’s ban of “Citizen Kane” ads in his newspapers came a few days after columnists and critics attended a screening of an early cut of the film on January 3, 1941. The movie was released the following May — so the celebrated film will commemorate its 75th anniversary this year. Other notable January 8 happenings in pop culture history: • 1946: »

- Emily Rome

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Magician: The Astonishing Life And Work Of Orson Welles – The Review

7 January 2016 9:49 AM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Not so very long ago I had a co-worker who described himself as a movie geek, film fan, cinema addict, what have you.  He talked about film as if he knew all about it.  I asked him one day what he thought of Orson Welles. His reply?

“I don’t think about Orson Welles, he was old and fat, now he’s dead, what am I supposed to think about him?”

Needless to say I never really talked to this person again, who shall remain nameless.  Of course the fact that he was an egocentric, arrogant, narcissistic weasel didn’t help matters.  (He claimed to have a small part in Tombstone, I have seen that movie several times, never spotted him, by the way…)

I simply cannot fathom the arrogance of someone dismissing, so casually one of the greatest film makers who ever lived.  I have been fascinated, obsessed even, »

- Sam Moffitt

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Everything Steven Soderbergh Watched and Read in 2015

6 January 2016 11:21 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Displaying a transparency that few filmmakers of his fame and / or caliber would even bother with, Steven Soderbergh has, for a couple of years, been keen on releasing lists of what he watched and read during the previous twelve months. If you’re at all interested in this sort of thing — and why not? what else are you even doing with your day? — the 2015 selection should be of strong interest, this being a time when he was fully enmeshed in the world of creating television.

He’s clearly observing the medium with a close eye, be it what’s on air or what his friends (specifically David Fincher and his stillborn projects) show him, and how that might relate to his apparent love of 48 Hours Mystery or approach to a comparatively light slate of cinematic assignments — specifically: it seems odd that the last time he watched Magic Mike Xxl, a »

- Nick Newman

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Square Enix Says Final Fantasy Xv Story Will Take Cues From The Last Of Us

5 January 2016 2:42 PM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

In 2013, Naughty Dog crafted its magnum opus with The Last of Us – a triumph in storytelling that was duly decorated with scores of awards. Held up as the Citizen Kane of gaming, the studio’s post-apocalyptic masterpiece is undoubtedly one of the greats, and its impact is still resounding around the industry even to this day, particularly in development circles.

At least, that’s according to Final Fantasy Xv Game Director Hajime Tabata, who pointed to the ways in which Naughty Dog rolled out the story for The Last of Us as inspiration for Square’s long-gestating Jrpg.

In an interview with Examiner, Tabata noted that the team at Square is treating gameplay and storytelling as one, thereby allowing them to doll out Xv‘s narrative in a way that feels organic.

“We are really trying to aim for something where the gameplay and storytelling are really one in the same, »

- Michael Briers

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Cinema and the Class Struggle

5 January 2016 10:10 AM, PST | MUBI | See recent MUBI news »

Les Soviets plus l’électricitéFrance’s central place within film culture may have its ups and downs when it comes to adventurous film-making, but its reputation as a hub of international film viewing holds strong. Yet beyond the central role of Cannes in the yearly festival rigmarole, and references to the riches of the Paris film-going scene and to vaguely understood state subsidies, little attention is actually paid to the wider infrastructures of a film-going culture which, after all, provided more ticket sales for Uncle Boonmee than the rest of the world combined. To say this is not to trumpet French exceptionalism far and wide: Olaf Möller has spoken lovingly of the key role of film programming on West German television in the 1970s, and Italian critics would no doubt be able to provide similar insight into the workings of Rai 3 or the myriad smaller festivals which continue to »

- Nathan Letoré

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Recommended Discs & Deals of the Week: ‘Sicario,’ ‘The Walk,’ ‘Experimenter,’ and More

5 January 2016 7:34 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Every week we dive into the cream of the crop when it comes to home releases, including Blu-ray and DVDs, as well as recommended deals of the week. Check out our rundown below and return every Tuesday for the best (or most interesting) films one can take home. Note that if you’re looking to support the site, every purchase you make through the links below helps us and is greatly appreciated.

The Complete Lady Snowblood (Toshiya Fujita)

A young woman (Meiko Kaji), trained from childhood as an assassin and hell-bent on revenge for the murders of her father and brother and the rape of her mother, hacks and slashes her way to gory satisfaction in turn-of-the-twentieth-century Japan. Rampant with inventive violence and spectacularly choreographed swordplay, Toshiya Fujita’s pair of influential cult classics Lady Snowblood and Lady Snowblood: Love Song of Vengeance are bloody, beautiful extravaganzas composed of »

- TFS Staff

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The Captive City

4 January 2016 3:44 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Robert Wise's taut noir suspenser about the Mafia takeover of a small city is like an underworld Invasion of the Body Snatchers. John Forsythe's newsman slowly realizes that gambling corruption has infiltrated the business district, city hall, and even his close associates; he's expected to become a crook too, or else. Great docudrama style aided by a special deep-focus lens; Estes Kefauver makes a personal appearance touting the crime-busting Washington committee that inspired the picture. The Captive City Blu-ray Kl Studio Classics 1952 / B&W / 1:33 flat full frame / 91 min. Street Date January 5, 2016 / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring John Forsythe, Joan Camden, Marjorie Crossland, Victor Sutherland, Ray Teal, Martin Milner, Geraldine Hall, Hal K. Dawson, Paul Brinegar, Estes Kefauver, Victor Romito. Cinematography Lee Garmes Film Editor Robert Swink Original Music Jerome Moross Written by Alvin M. Josephy Jr., Karl Kamb Produced by Theron Warth Directed by Robert Wise

Reviewed »

- Glenn Erickson

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The Beginning or the End

4 January 2016 3:43 PM, PST | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Stop! Don't touch that dial... if you like your atom-age propaganda straight up, MGM has the movie for you, an expensive 1946 docu-drama that became 'the official story' for the making of the bomb. The huge cast includes Brian Donlevy, Robert Walker, Tom Drake, Audrey Totter, Hume Cronyn, Hurd Hatfield, and Joseph Calleia. How trustworthy is the movie? It begins by showing footage of a time capsule being buried -- that supposedly contains the film we are watching. Think about that. Mom, Apple Pie, the Flag and God are enlisted to argume that we should stop worrying and love the fact that bombs are just peachy-keen dandy. The Beginning or the End DVD-r The Warner Archive Collection 1947 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 112 min. / Street Date September 22, 2015 / available through the WBshop / 21.99 Starring Brian Donlevy, Robert Walker, Tom Drake, Beverly Tyler, Audrey Totter, Hume Cronyn, Hurd Hatfield, Joseph Calleia, Godfrey Tearle, Victor Francen, »

- Glenn Erickson

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

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