Citizen Kane
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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 92 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


Reefer Madness August 4th at Schlafly Bottleworks – “Weed from the Devil’s Garden!”

28 July 2016 1:50 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“The motion picture you are about to witness may startle you. It would not have been possible, otherwise, to sufficiently emphasize the frightful toll of the new drug menace which is destroying the youth of America in alarmingly increasing numbers. Marihuana!”

Reefer Madness screens Thursday August 4th at 7:00pm at Schlafly Bottleworks (7260 Southwest Avenue Maplewood, Mo 63143). $6  for the screening.

In 1932, Harry Anslinger was named head of the Federal Bureau of Narcotics. The position was not much more than a figurehead because all the bureau was involved in was the amount of morphine etc. that were in medicine like cough syrup. Anslinger wanted more power and the best way to get power was to put more “narcotics” under his control. So he set his sights on marijuana. He met and became friends with Charles Randolph Hearst (the Citizen Kane guy!) and they talked about their shared dislike of cannabis. During this time, »

- Tom Stockman

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'Mr. Robot' Recap: Winner Take All

27 July 2016 8:30 PM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

There are a lot of adjectives you can use to describe Mr. Robot, but "hopeful" isn't usually one of them. No matter how you slice it, this is a place where loved ones turn up dead, no one's to be trusted, and people eat pills out of their own puke to make the pain go away. But this week's hour-long episode, entitled "eps2.2_init1.asec," (because Mr. Robot, people) is about as bright and shiny as this show is ever likely to get. We even see a real smile out of Elliot — no Adderall involved. »

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Paul Greengrass’ Top 10 Films

26 July 2016 12:43 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Paul Greengrass has spent the past twenty-plus years crafting lean, energetic action films such as his Bourne entries — a franchise he returns to this Friday with Jason Bourne — and equally taut docudramas such as Captain Philips and United 93. His staging and editing of action has become a seminal staple of modern cinema, though it has proven hard to properly imitate as the coherence he often achieves is lost on his imitators. His films explore national paranoia and wounded heroes (often Matt Damon), while his style focuses on kinetic, intimate, and spur-of-the-moment action and storytelling.

Thanks to BFI‘s most recent Sight & Sound poll, Greengrass has compiled a list of his ten favorite films, many of which globe trot outside of the U.S. to everywhere from France (Godard), to Japan (Kurosawa), and Russia (Eisenstein), among others. There’s a clear connective thread between the French New Wave style of »

- Mike Mazzanti

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‘Hillary’s America’ Review: Dinesh D’Souza’s Latest Documentary Is Republican Propaganda At Its Dumbest

19 July 2016 1:21 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Hillary’s America,” the third documentary from author, filmmaker and convicted felon Dinesh D’Souza, begins with an undeniably fascinating premise: What if a Twitter egg made a movie? While D’Souza’s previous feature-length attacks on the Democratic Party were similarly falsified and foaming at the mouth (remember the part in 2014’s “America” when he argued that Hillary Clinton wants to use Nasa to turn the United States into her own personal panopticon of terror?), “Hillary’s America” is different — this time, it’s personal.

In January of 2014, D’Souza was indicted for violating campaign finance laws after it was discovered that he made illegal contributions to Wendy Long’s Senate bid (she wound up losing by more than 40 percentage points). He was found guilty, and accused the court of selective persecution on the basis that the Obama administration was supposedly trying to silence its dissidents.

“It all began »

- David Ehrlich

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Steven Spielberg: ‘It’s all about making kids feel like they can do anything’ | Tom Shone

16 July 2016 1:00 AM, PDT | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From Et to Jaws, Steven Spielberg has brought us cinema’s most enduring stories. He reveals why he’s driven by fear, how he beat his bullies – and the heartbreak behind his take on The Bfg

When Steven Spielberg is enthused, his sentences pick up speed and momentum, the words coming in long, unpunctuated bursts that have you worried he’s going to forget to breathe. Just over a month ago, he tells me, his eldest daughter Jessica had a baby girl, his fourth grandchild. Spielberg has seven children, aged between 19 and 39; now he is making up stories for his grandchildren the way he did for them. “They’re all stories of empowerment, and being magical or able to read your mom and dad’s mind, or your best friend being a Tyrannosaurus rex that only you know about and he lives in your backyard,” he explains excitedly.

We are »

- Tom Shone

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Top 5 Films For Bastille Day, July 14

13 July 2016 7:50 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

In honor of Bastille Day, July 14, France’s independence day, here is a list of five top French Revolution films (in no particular order). Not all the films are French and not all have to do with The Revolution. but all celebrate French patriotism or the revolutionary ideals of Liberté, Égalité et Fraternité.

Oddly, there are not a lot of great French films on the Revolution, although it certainly seems a ripe subject for an epic. Still, all these are great films, in the spirit of the day. Vive La France!

Danton (1983)

The great French actor Gerard Depardieu stars as Danton, one of the early leaders of the Revolution but who fell from power as revolutionary leaders became more radical, in this excellent French film from Polish director Andrzej Wajda. It is considered one of the best films on the Revolution, but it was also a covert jab at the »

- Movie Geeks

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Tweetweek: Citizen Kane, Odd Marquees, New Arrivals

9 July 2016 6:30 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

I have to begin this week's tweet roundup with this amazing find from Scott Feinberg - a press clipping about Citizen Kane on Oscar night and the room reaction to every mention of the film.

Portion of Nyt dispatch from 1942 Oscars ceremony pertaining to Citizen Kane's poor showing ("boos and catcalls") pic.twitter.com/tNs3hmREGe

— Scott Feinberg (@ScottFeinberg) July 7, 2016

 

Crazy, right? The politics of the moment are always so hard to properly contextualize after the fact when it comes to art that endures.

More entertainment tweets ahead but first a joyous announcement from our friend and podcast mate Katey Rich »

- NATHANIEL R

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Ghostbusters (2016) review

6 July 2016 9:06 AM, PDT | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Simon Brew Published Date  Sunday, July 10, 2016 - 18:09

As the credits played over the end of Paul Feig’s much-talked-about new take on Ghostbusters, my mind was awash. There were things that didn’t quite work. There were bits I really liked. How did it measure up compared to the others? What did I want to say about it?

And then I stopped, and realised I had a great big grin on my face (bolstered still further by the excellent, unmissable end credits). I think that’s something to easily lose sight of. That this is – for all the noise that’s followed the project for the last year – ultimately supposed to be a big, broad summer comedy blockbuster. Its aim is to entertain. In that respect, I think Ghostbusters is mission accomplished. Stacked next to any Transformers film, for instance, and it’s not even the slightest sniff of a competition. »

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How ‘Neon Demon’ Composer Cliff Martinez Balanced Humor, Horror & Bernard Herrmann Temp Tracks

1 July 2016 1:16 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

In Cliff Martinez’s first collaboration with Nicolas Winding Refn on “Drive” the director gave the composer a strong sense of what he wanted from the score.

“He assembled a temp score [existing music used during editing], which was very influential and exerted a pretty strong influence on ‘Drive,'” said Martinez in a recent interview with IndieWire. “On ‘Neon Demon’ he really threw me a curveball, he had it temped from top to bottom exclusively with music of Bernard Herrmann.”

Read More: ‘Neon Demon’ Dp Natasha Braier How She Turned Bright Color Schemes Into A Nicolas Winding Refn Nightmare

The scores of the legendary Hollywood composer Herrmann, most commonly remembered for creating big, dramatic orchestral music for films like “Citizen Kane,” “Pyscho,” “Vertigo” and “Taxi Driver”, are in a different sonic universe from Martinez’s scores, which are defined by sparse, modern music that gives his films a dark, electronic undertone.

“Nicolas said, ‘I »

- Chris O'Falt

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Happy Birthday Ray Harryhausen – Here are His Ten Best Films

29 June 2016 3:36 PM, PDT | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

Article by Jim Batts, Dana Jung, Sam Moffitt, and Tom Stockman

Special effects legend Ray Harryhausen, whose dazzling and innovative visual effects work on fantasy adventure films such as Jason And The Argonauts  and  The 7th Voyage Of Sinbad  passed away in 2013 at age 92. In 1933, the then-13-year-old Ray Harryhausen saw King Kong at a Hollywood theater and was inspired – not only by Kong, who was clearly not just a man in a gorilla suit, but also by the dinosaurs. He came out of the theatre “stunned and haunted. They looked absolutely lifelike … I wanted to know how it was done.” It was done by using stop-motion animation: jointed models filmed one frame at a time to simulate movement. Harryhausen was to become the prime exponent of the technique and its combination with live action. The influence of Harryhausen on film luminaries like Steven Spielberg, George Lucas, Peter Jackson, and »

- Movie Geeks

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TV Review: ‘Center Stage: On Pointe’

25 June 2016 12:00 PM, PDT | Variety - TV News | See recent Variety - TV News news »

The 2000 film “Center Stage” — the source material for “Center Stage: On Pointe,” which is itself the third film in what we are now forced to call the “Center Stage” universe — is, for what it is, modestly brilliant. Written by Carol Heikkinen, who also wrote cult classic “Empire Records,” and directed by Nicholas Hytner, a theater director of some acclaim, the original “Center Stage” is a slightly too-cerebral melodrama about the pressures of professional dance meeting the pressures of being a teenager. It did not do notably well at the box office, but — like “Empire Records” — “Center Stage” found an audience after its theatrical release, due to some combination of home video sales and TV airings of the relatively family-friendly film.

Because the film is so easy to watch — this is a nice way of saying “mediocre” — it invites repeat viewings, to the point that what happens ceases to matter at all. Instead »

- Sonia Saraiya

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Michael Moore’s Traverse City Film Festival Unveils Historic 2016 Lineup

24 June 2016 4:05 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Michael Moore’s 12th annual Traverse City Film Festival is right around the corner. This year the celebration will run from July 26 -31 in Michigan and boast over 200 film screenings. Unlike any other, the historical events will feature productions like “The 33,” “Citizen Kane,” “Dope,” “Hell or High Water,” “Here Alone,” “Hunt for the Wilderpeople,” “Mustang” and many more critically acclaimed films.

Some of this year’s special events also include Michiganders Make Movies, a selection of films made by people from Michigan, free morning filmmaker panels, Kids Fest, midnight movie interruptions with comedian Doug Benson, The Sidebar: Food on Film and Open Space, an outdoor cinema under the stars.

Read More: Review: Has Michael Moore Gone Soft? With ‘Where to Invade Next,’ He Changes His Tune

Traverse City Film Festival will also include films centering around the Presidential election and a worldwide live screening event of Moore’s new picture, »

- Liz Calvario

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NYC Weekend Watch: ‘The Puppetmaster,’ David Bordwell, ‘The King of Comedy’ & More

23 June 2016 10:03 PM, PDT | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

Since any New York cinephile has a nearly suffocating wealth of theatrical options, we figured it’d be best to compile some of the more worthwhile repertory showings into one handy list. Displayed below are a few of the city’s most reliable theaters and links to screenings of their weekend offerings — films you’re not likely to see in a theater again anytime soon, and many of which are, also, on 35mm. If you have a chance to attend any of these, we’re of the mind that it’s time extremely well-spent.

Museum of Modern Art

The Mark Lee Ping-Bing retro has its last weekend, with titles including Hou Hsiao-hsien‘s Dust in the Wind and his rarely screened The Puppetmaster.

Museum of the Moving Image

“David Bordwell: How 1940s Critics Changed American Film Culture” offers a crash course in one sliver of film history. Citizen Kane »

- Nick Newman

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Watch: Samantha Bee Uses ‘Breaking Bad’ To Explain the Fate of the Gop

21 June 2016 10:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

Last night’s episode of “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” pulled no punches, comparing Donald Trump and certain Republican party members to Hitler and the Third Reich without any hesitation, while acknowledging that not all Republicans are racist — some of them just get a bad rap. How best to understand the complexities of what’s happened to the Gop over the last several decades? In this hilarious sequence, Bee compares the fate of moderate Republicans to that of Walter White in “Breaking Bad.”

Read More: To Desk or Not To Desk? Or, Why Samantha Bee Is The Biggest Badass in Late Night

Watch out for spoilers for the entire run of Vince Gilligan’s beloved AMC drama… and also the current makeup of the Republican party? “Think of the modern Gop as a bunch of smart entrepreneurs and small businessmen who entered into an ill-advised partnership with white supremacists for »

- Kate Halliwell

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Watch: Samantha Bee Uses ‘Breaking Bad’ To Explain the Fate of the Gop

21 June 2016 10:32 AM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last night’s episode of “Full Frontal with Samantha Bee” pulled no punches, comparing Donald Trump and certain Republican party members to Hitler and the Third Reich without any hesitation, while acknowledging that not all Republicans are racist — some of them just get a bad rap. How best to understand the complexities of what’s happened to the Gop over the last several decades? In this hilarious sequence, Bee compares the fate of moderate Republicans to that of Walter White in “Breaking Bad.”

Read More: To Desk or Not To Desk? Or, Why Samantha Bee Is The Biggest Badass in Late Night

Watch out for spoilers for the entire run of Vince Gilligan’s beloved AMC drama… and also the current makeup of the Republican party? “Think of the modern Gop as a bunch of smart entrepreneurs and small businessmen who entered into an ill-advised partnership with white supremacists for »

- Kate Halliwell

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Documentarian Ken Burns Uses Stanford Commencement Speech To Disavow ‘Infantile, Bullying’ Donald Trump

13 June 2016 1:35 PM, PDT | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Over the weekend, documentarian Ken Burns delivered the commencement speech at Stanford University, and the filmmaker used the opportunity to disavow presidential hopeful Donald Trump in the way only a true student of history could. Burns was reflective in his comments, but he was also extremely pointed, and there’s no way to walk away from his speech without a very clear sense of how Burns feels about Trump and, moreover, how he feels about the possibility of a Trump presidency.

Read More: Donald Trump Says Orson Welles Was ‘Totally F*cked Up’ & a ‘Mess’ — But He Still Loves ‘Citizen Kane

“For 216 years, our elections, though bitterly contested, have featured the philosophies and character of candidates who were clearly qualified. That is not the case this year,” Burns said.

“One is glaringly not qualified,” he added. “So before you do anything with your well-earned degree, you must do everything you can to defeat the retrograde forces that have invaded our democratic process, divided our house, to fight against, no matter your political persuasion, the dictatorial tendencies of the candidate with zero experience in the much maligned but subtle art of governance; who is against lots of things, but doesn’t seem to be for anything, offering only bombastic and contradictory promises, and terrifying Orwellian statements; a person who easily lies, creating an environment where the truth doesn’t seem to matter; who has never demonstrated any interest in anyone or anything but himself and his own enrichment; who insults veterans, threatens a free press, mocks the handicapped, denigrates women, immigrants, and all Muslims; a man who took more than a day to remember to disavow a supporter who advocates white supremacy and the Ku Klux Klan; an infantile, bullying man who, depending on his mood, is willing to discard old and established alliances, treaties, and longstanding relationships.”

Phew.

“As a student of history, I recognize this type,” Burns continued. “He emerges everywhere and in all eras. We see nurtured in his campaign an incipient proto-fascism, a nativist anti-immigrant Know Nothing-ism, a disrespect for the judiciary, the prospect of women losing authority over their own bodies, African-Americans again asked to go to the back of the line, voter suppression gleefully promoted, jingoistic saber-rattling, a total lack of historical awareness, a political paranoia that, predictably, points fingers, always making the other wrong.”

Burns wasn’t dead yet, adding, “These are all virulent strains that have at times infected us in the past. But they now loom in front of us again — all happening at once. We know from our history books that these are the diseases of ancient and now fallen empires.”

Read More: ‘Saturday Night Live’ Review: Donald Trump’s Dismal Hosting Ability Voted Down By a Wide Margin

You can check out the full contents of his speech here.

You can also watch the full speech, thanks to Buzzfeed, below:

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Related storiesDonald Trump Says Orson Welles Was 'Totally F*cked Up' & a 'Mess' -- But He Still Loves 'Citizen Kane'Bruce Campbell Debunks Donald Trump Abuse Myth & Outlines 'Evil Dead' ConnectionMeryl Streep Impersonates Donald Trump, Complete With Fat Suit & Orange Face Makeup »

- Kate Erbland

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15 Things We Learned From the 'De Palma' Documentary

9 June 2016 8:59 AM, PDT | Rollingstone.com | See recent Rolling Stone news »

The setup to De Palma, Noah Baumbach and Jake Paltrow's engrossing new documentary about the life and career of controversial filmmaker Brian De Palma (opening in theaters on June 10th), couldn't be simpler: The 75-year-old director dissects most of his films and shares analyses and behind-the-scenes anecdotes in between clips. Forget talking-head testimonials from collaborators, flashy visuals or dramatic reenactments. You just get the man himself, looking back and holding court in all his verbose, insightful glory.

And that is more than enough. Known primarily for his obsession with voyeurism, »

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Film Review: Warcraft

8 June 2016 5:22 AM, PDT | LatinoReview | See recent LatinoReview news »

If you can get past character names like Garona and Durotan, worlds known as Draenor or Azeroth, and baddies from Gul’dan to Medivh, you’ll be left with a half-decent movie, the adaptation of the fantasy videogame Warcraft.

Since the film was released early in Europe, reviews are, to put it mildly, unkind.  But you really have to put things in context.  Fantasy videogame films are never going to please critics and are unlikely to yield the next Citizen Kane.  It is not that the bar needs to be lowered, it’s only that it needs to be explained.  The entire purpose of these movies is to entertain (as opposed to challenge) fans, and this Warcraft does in spades.

The story opens with a horde of (what else?) orcs escaping their dying world through a mysterious portal into the human world, Azeroth.  The orcs are led by the evil Gul’dan, »

- J Don Birnam

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Second Opinion – Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows (2016)

2 June 2016 12:05 PM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles: Out of the Shadows, 2016.

Directed by Dave Green.

Starring Megan Fox, Stephen Amell, Will Arnett, Alan Ritchson, Jeremy Howard, Pete Ploszek, Noel Fisher, Tyler Perry, Brian Tee, Gary Anthony Williams, Stephen Farrelly, Tony Shaloub, Brad Garrett and Laura Linney.

Synopsis:

The Turtles face off against Shredder, who this time has help from genetically-engineered henchmen and intergalactic villain Krang.

I have a confession to make – I saw the last Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles movie at the cinema Twice. Not because I thought it was great, but because it was, for me, the perfect kind of terrible (I mean, how can you truly hate a film that contains the line “Drain every single drop of their blood – even if it kills them”?). As someone who grew up loving the Tmnt cartoon, the arcade game and the action figures, I should have been heartbroken and offended by the soulless, »

- Amie Cranswick

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Mike Gold: The Dimension of Mind

1 June 2016 5:00 AM, PDT | Comicmix.com | See recent Comicmix news »

The so-called Golden Age of Television, with its two and one-half channels of network programming, produced an astonishing number of great writers, directors and talent. To name but a very, very few: Barbara Bel Geddes, Paddy Chayefsky, George Roy Hill, Ron Howard, Ernest Kinoy, Jack Lemmon, Sidney Lumet, Paul Newman, Robert Redford, Boris Sagal, Rod Serling, Rod Steiger, Gore Vidal, Joanne Woodward… my fingers won’t hold out long enough to type even a “best-of” list.

You’ll never guess which of the above pioneers is my favorite.

When Scottish engineer John Logie Baird first demonstrated television in January 1926 (six years before Philo Farnsworth demonstrated the first electronic television), Rod Serling was just a few days over one year old. Baby boomers think we grew up with television; Mr. Serling actually has that honor. And he did a lot more with the medium than we would.

His worldview was clearly »

- Mike Gold

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002

1-20 of 92 items from 2016   « Prev | Next »


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