Comedy about an invisible man.

Director:

Writers:

(original screenplay), (original screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
Jeffrey Lynn ...
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Joan Shotesbury
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Professor Shotesbury
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George Appleby
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Christine Lunceford
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Robert Struck
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Jimmie Barbour
Willie Best ...
Willie
Ivan F. Simpson ...
Dean Claxton (as Ivan Simpson)
Tod Andrews ...
Bill (as Michael Ames)
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Terrence Abbott (as DeWolf Hopper)
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Mrs. Lunceford
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Professor Moggs
Sidney Bracey ...
Barrett (as Sidney Bracy)
Wade Boteler ...
Inspector Deming
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Storyline

Wealthy scion Peter DeHaven, about to marry socialite Christine Lunceford, wakes up after bachelor party revelry to find he's been turned invisible by eccentric college professor Reginald Shotesbury. An unbelievable series of events is revealed by several witnesses testifying in a "mystery trial" to determine the reason for DeHaven's "disappearance". Written by Doug Sederberg <vornoff@sonic.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Now you see him . . . now you don't!


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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

6 December 1941 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Black Widow  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(RCA Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

When Christine faints in the doorway of her bedroom, a hand can be seen briefly appearing behind her to catch her as she falls. See more »

Quotes

[Needing a corpse for his boss's life-restoring experiments, William checks the morgue for a suitable body]
William: This one's got a lily in his hands. He may be dead, but he's neat about it.
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User Reviews

 
Of All Bodies To Make Invisible ...!
16 August 2005 | by (NY, NY) – See all my reviews

Jeffrey Lynn was one of the most attractive and interesting actors of the 1940s and early fifties. What a shame that he is invisible for most of this silly endeavor.

Be assured that this is no "Invisible Man." Claude Rains was a great actor and he was superb in the excellent movie. This one is lightweight and silly.

Movies like this and "Topper," as well as "Blithe Spirit" suffer today from something fro which they cannot be blamed: We are very much accustomed to people disappearing and reappearing and voices coming from nowhere while household objects are moved: We grew up on "Bewitched" and "I Dream of Jeannie." Edward Everett Horton gets billing under Lynn and Jane Wyman, quite good playing Horton's daughter. But he is the central figure. And he is surprisingly unappealing. He dithers as usual but he is a scientist who seems to have no regard for life so long as he gets his experiments completed.

Willie Best, so often cast and directed to play the most embarrassing stereotype of a black man, here comes through better than many, certainly better than Horton: Before the tile (human) body disappears, Horton is experimenting on a monkey named Charlie.

His character shows no concern for the animal's well being or comfort. Best does.

The movie is entertaining enough but it is a one-note joke. As it moves on, its 72 minutes begin to feel as if they need a roadshow-style intermission -- during which much of the audience would flee..


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