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The Thief of Bagdad (1940) Poster

Trivia

Filming began in Britain, but because of the Blitz, the production relocated to Hollywood. There was such a long break in production, Sabu's early scenes had to be re-shot because he had grown several inches.
This is the first movie to ever use blue screens.
When filming began in the US, the stricter censorship codes of the Hays Office there were applied. One of the most obvious differences between the scenes shot in the UK and those filmed in the USA is that the tops of the actresses' costumes were buttoned up all the way to satisfy the Hays Office. That kind of clue makes it easier to identify the US-shot scenes than trying to spot differences in the sets.
Most of the 18 riders who clear the market prior to the Princess's procession are women. This may have been because so many men had been taken into the British armed forces.
Producer Alexander Korda was so demanding that he went through six directors during the production of this film, including his brother Zoltan Korda and leading art director William Cameron Menzies.
Vivien Leigh was originally cast in the role of the Princess, but when, in late 1938, she won the part of Scarlett O'Hara in Gone with the Wind (1939). Producer Alexander Korda gave the role to young up-and-coming starlet June Duprez.
Filmed at London's Denham Studios, which had just merged with J. Arthur Rank's nearby Pinewood Studios.
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The first assigned director, Ludwig Berger, wanted his old friend, 80-year-old Austrian operetta composer Oscar Straus, to compose the score. Miklós Rózsa only won the assignment by sitting in an office adjoining Berger's and playing his catchy melodies over and over. The Viennese waltzes that Straus had supplied were quickly dropped in favor of Rozsa's sweeping and colorful score.
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Film debut of John Justin.
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The correct spelling of the title ought to be the Thief of Baghdad, as it is a western film and this is the expected English spelling. However some of producers and Writers are of eastern European descent where the alternative Bagdad version is sometimes used. Other variations include Bughdad and Bhagdad.
The first director, Ludwig Berger, was dismissed because of creative differences with producer Alexander Korda. Berger envisioned the film as a lyrical black-and-white fantasy film while Korda believed that the film should be a very colorful epic. Colorful sketches which Alexander Korda's brother, Vincent Korda, had made proved to be the final tipping point that the film should be shot in color and that another director should be brought on to fulfill Korda's vision.
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Douglas Fairbanks actually owned the rights to the title of the film, which had been one of his biggest hits when he made The Thief of Bagdad (1924). When Alexander Korda settled on producing an epic version of one of the Thousand-and-One-Nights Tales, he found the popularity and draw of Fairbanks's original title irresistible. In a 1938 banquet at the Savoy Hotel in London, Korda made sure he was seated next to Fairbanks and negotiated the rights to the film over dinner.
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Replacement director Michael Powell and several key members of the film's production crew were taken off of the film once Great Britain officially declared war on Germany. Producer Alexander Korda had promised Winston Churchill any resources he could provide to produce wartime propaganda once war was officially declared. Powell and others were reassigned to direct The Lion Has Wings (1939), a propagandized documentary about the R.A.F., to boost British morale. Production of this film shifted to the United States and acquired a new director and key crew members.
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Directorial changes, the shifting of production to the United States at the outbreak of war, and other costly delays and circumstances made the film's budget balloon far beyond original projections. The production became so costly that the American distributor United Artists put up additional funds so the film could be completed.
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Alexander Korda had originally planned to shoot several scenes on location in Africa. The outbreak of World War II precluded location shoots in Africa, so once the production moved to the United States Korda scouted for a suitable replacement site. Korda's scout team suggested the Arizona desert and the film crew shot on location in and around the Grand Canyon.
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The film's screenwriter, Miles Malleson, has a rather significant cameo as the toy-obsessed Sultan of Basra.
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William Cameron Menzies, who had served as the art director for Douglas Fairbanks's original The Thief of Bagdad (1924), both worked in the art department for this film and helped to produce it.
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This film was included in the first syndicated television presentation of a package of major studio feature films on USA television; it premiered in New York City Friday 24 September 1948 on WPIX (Channel 11) and in Los Angeles Sunday 3 October 1948 on KTLA (Channel 5). Although filmed in Technicolor, these telecasts were in B&W, since color broadcasting was still in its experimental stage. The package consisted of 24 Alexander Korda productions originally released theatrically between 1933 and 1942.
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