The Thief of Bagdad (1940) - News Poster

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‘Arrival,’ ‘La La Land’ Among Film Music Critics Nominees

‘Arrival,’ ‘La La Land’ Among Film Music Critics Nominees
The International Film Music Critics Assn. has announced nominations for the 13th annual Ifmca Awards for excellence in musical scoring in 2016. Leading the pack are Michael Giacchino and Justin Hurwitz with five nominations each, and Abel Korzeniowski, with four.

Giacchino is nominated for his work on comic book fantasy film “Doctor Strange” and the socially conscious box office hit “Zootopia.” In addition, his song “Night on the Yorktown” from “Star Trek Beyond” is up for film music composition of the year. A 36-time Ifmca Award nominee, Giacchino previously received score of the year honors in 2004 for “The Incredibles,” and in 2009 for “Up.”

Hurwitz’s “La La Land” work has already been a force this season, taking home two Golden Globes among countless other prizes. The contemporary homage to Hollywood movie musicals earned him Ifmca noms for score of the year, comedy score, and film music composition of the year. Hurwitz
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Witness the Evolution of Cinematography with Compilation of Oscar Winners

This past weekend, the American Society of Cinematographers awarded Greig Fraser for his contribution to Lion as last year’s greatest accomplishment in the field. Of course, his achievement was just a small sampling of the fantastic work from directors of photography, but it did give us a stronger hint at what may be the winner on Oscar night. Ahead of the ceremony, we have a new video compilation that honors all the past winners in the category at the Academy Awards

Created by Burger Fiction, it spans the stunning silent landmark Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans all the way up to the end of Emmanuel Lubezki‘s three-peat win for The Revenant. Aside from the advancements in color and aspect ration, it’s a thrill to see some of cinema’s most iconic shots side-by-side. However, the best way to experience the evolution of the craft is by
See full article at The Film Stage »

A Beautiful Video Compilation of Every Best Cinematography Winner

This is splendid. YouTube channel Burger Fiction has put together a beautiful compilation video of every Best Cinematography winner at the Oscars from 1927 to 2015, when it was award to Emmanuel Lubezki of The Revenant, a back-to-back win after Birdman. For admirers of cinematography, this is a breathtaking and awe-inspiring video. And it just makes me want to watch everything all over again. From Cleopatra, The Thief Of Bagdad, Ben-Hur, Doctor Zhivago, Dance With Wolves, Braveheart, The Aviator, Couching Tiger Hidden Dragon, There Will Be Blood to Inception, there's so many excellent films awarded in this category. Thanks to David Chen fro the tip on this. Originally from YouTube, made by Burger Fiction. For the full list of all the Best Cinematography winners seen in this, visit their Tumblr. The Best Cinematography category has been around since the very beginning. From 1939 to 1967 (with the exception of 1957), there were also separate awards
See full article at FirstShowing.net »

The People vs. Fritz Bauer

What happens when a prosecutor tracks down one of the most evil criminals of the century, only to find that politics and corruption prevent him from issuing an arrest warrant? This is the true story of the hunt for the Nazi war criminal Adolf Eichmann — not from the Pov of the Israeli agents that pounced on him in Argentina, but a German prosecutor hemmed in on all sides by Nazi sympathizers in his own government bureaucracy.

The People vs. Fritz Bauer

Blu-ray

Cohen Media Group

2015 / Color / 2:35 widescreen / 105 min. / Der Staat gegen Fritz Bauer / Street Date January 10, 2017 / 30.99

Starring Burghardt Klaußner, Ronald Zehrfeld, Michael Schenck, Cornelia Goöscher, Lilith Stangenberg.

Cinematography Jens Harant

Film Editor Barbara Gies

Original Music Christopher M. Kaiser, Julian Maas

Written by Lars Kraume, Olivier Guez

Produced by Thomas Kufus

Directed by Lars Kraume

As a movie reviewer I’m attracted to certain subjects. I’ve written up
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

‘Pimpernel’ Smith

How could England have won the war without him? Horatio Smith sneaks about in Nazi Germany, liberating concentration camp inmates right under the noses of the Gestapo. Leslie Howard directed and stars in this wartime escapist spy thriller, as a witty professor too passive to be suspected as the mystery spy.

‘Pimpernel’ Smith

Blu-ray

Olive Films

1941 / B&W / 1:37 flat Academy / 121 min. / Street Date November 15, 2016 / available through the Olive Films website / 29.98

Starring Leslie Howard, Francis L. Sullivan, Mary Morris, Allan Jeayes, Peter Gawthorne, Hugh McDermott, David Tomlinson, Raymond Huntley, Sebastian Cabot, Irene Handl, Ronald Howard, Michael Rennie.

Cinematography Mutz Greenbaum

Camera Operators Guy Green, Jack Hildyard

Film Editor Douglas Myers

Original Music John Greenwood

Written by Anatole de Grunwald, Roland Pertwee, A.G. Macdonell, Wolfgang Wilhelm based on a character by Baroness Emmuska Orczy

Produced by Leslie Howard, Harold Huth

Directed by Leslie Howard

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

I like movies
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Destiny

Death doesn't take a holiday in this, the granddaddy of movies about the woeful duties of the Grim Reaper. Fritz Lang's heavy-duty Expressionist fable is as German as they get -- a morbid folk tale with an emotionally powerful finish. Destiny Blu-ray Kino Classics 1921 / B&W / 1:33 flat / 98 min. / Street Date August 30, 2016 / Der müde Tod / available through Kino Lorber / 29.95 Starring Lil Dagover, Walter Janssen, Bernhard Goetzke, Rudolf Klein-Rogge, Georg John. Cinematography Bruno Mondi, Erich Nitzschmann, Herrmann Saalfrank, Bruno Timm, Fritz Arno Wagner Film Editor Fritz Lang Written by Fritz Lang, Thea von Harbou Produced by Erich Pommer Directed by Fritz Lang

Reviewed by Glenn Erickson

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari takes the prize for the most influential work of early German Expressionism, but coming in a close second is the film in which Fritz Lang first got his act (completely) together, 1921's Destiny (Der müde Tod). A wholly cinematic
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

The Goonies Never Say Die This Weekend Midnights at The Tivoli!

“C’mon Mikey, give me a lickery kiss!”

The Goonies (1985) plays this weekend (July 29th and 30th) at The Tivoli at midnight as part of their Reel Late at the Tivoli midnight series.

Four kids – Mikey (Sean Astin), Chunk (Jeff Cohen), Mouth (Corey Feldman) and Data (Ke Huy Quan) who call themselves “The Goonies” finds a map in the attic of Mikey’s house. Their beloved neighborhood is about to become a golf course, so they go out on an adventure to find lost buried treasure. Unfortunately, three crooks Mama Fratelli (Anne Ramsey) with her sons Jake (Robert Davi) and Francis (Joe Pantoliano) are also seeking the treasure.

One of the most beloved movies of the 80’s, The Goonies is a timeless adventure from director Richard Donner and producer Steven Spielberg that has stood the test of time.

The Goonies has youth, fun, and excitement by the truckload but also
See full article at WeAreMovieGeeks.com »

At Last: A Biography of William Cameron Menzies

William Cameron Menzies: The Shape of Films to Come by James Curtis (Pantheon) This is a book that demanded to be written. William Cameron Menzies has always been one of my heroes. He is the man who brought a unique gift for visualization to such films as Douglas FairbanksThe Thief of Bagdad, Gone With The Wind, and Alfred Hitchcock’s Foreign Correspondent, as well as minor films from the silent and sound era that deserve to be seen just for his sets and compositions. He is also celebrated for two of the (few) films he directed, Things to Come and Invaders from Mars. How fortunate for us that James Curtis took on the job of chronicling...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Remembering Oscar-Winning Gwtw Art Director Menzies

William Cameron Menzies. William Cameron Menzies movies on TCM: Murderous Joan Fontaine, deadly Nazi Communists Best known as an art director/production designer, William Cameron Menzies was a jack-of-all-trades. It seems like the only things Menzies didn't do was act and tap dance in front of the camera. He designed and/or wrote, directed, produced, etc., dozens of films – titles ranged from The Thief of Bagdad to Invaders from Mars – from the late 1910s all the way to the mid-1950s. Among Menzies' most notable efforts as an art director/production designer are: Ernst Lubitsch's first Hollywood movie, the Mary Pickford star vehicle Rosita (1923). Herbert Brenon's British-set father-son drama Sorrell and Son (1927). David O. Selznick's mammoth production of Gone with the Wind, which earned Menzies an Honorary Oscar. The Sam Wood movies Our Town (1940), Kings Row (1942), and For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943). H.C. Potter's Mr. Lucky
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Criterion Picks on Fandor: Directing in Color

Each week, the fine folks at Fandor add a number of films to their Criterion Picks area, which will then be available to subscribers for the following twelve days. This week, the Criterion Picks focus on nine films where some of the most famous directors in the Criterion Collection first directed a feature in color.

Saturate yourself in the vivid stylings of some of our favorite directors, wielding a whole new spectrum of expression for the very first time.

Don’t have a Fandor subscription? They offer a free trial membership.

Dodes’ka-den, the Japanese Drama by Akira Kurosawa

The unforgettable Dodes’Ka-den was made at a tumultuous moment in Kurosawa’s life. And all of his hopes, fears and artistic passion are on fervent display in this, his gloriously shot first color film.

Equinox Flower, the Japanese Drama by Yasujirô Ozu

Later in his career, Yasujiro Ozu started becoming
See full article at CriterionCast »

Examining Hollywood Remakes: Aladdin

  • Cinelinx
Its remake time again. For this article, we’re tackling Disney! We’ll be dissecting a popular animated movie, whose cinematic predecessor is a fantasy classic. This week, Cinelinx looks at Disney’s Aladdin. (1992)

Disney has taken many famous old stories and made them into modern cinematic blockbusters. One of those was 1992’s Aladdin, which was based on the story “The Thief of Bagdad” from Arabian Nights: Tales of 1,001 Nights. Of course, this was not the first time the story was translated to film. It was done previously in 1940 as The Thief of Bagdad, which has been described by Roger Ebert as “One of the greatest fantasy films ever made, on a level with The Wizard of Oz.” (There was actually a silent version released in 1924, but we’re going to save the old silent films for another time.) Was the Disney remake a worthy follow-up to the 1940 classic?
See full article at Cinelinx »

British Film and Hollywood: What If Hitchcock Had Stayed in the UK? Interview with Film Historian Anthony Slide

Alfred Hitchcock, Cary Grant, and Ingrid Bergman: The 'Notorious' British (Hitchcock, Grant) and Swedish (Bergman) talent. British actors and directors in Hollywood; Hollywood actors and directors in Britain: Anthony Slide's 'A Special Relationship.' 'A Special Relationship' Q&A: Britain in Hollywood and Hollywood in Britain First of all, what made you think of a book on “the special relationship” between the American and British film industries – particularly on the British side? I was aware of a couple of books on the British in Hollywood, but I wanted to move beyond that somewhat limited discussion and document the whole British/American relationship as it applied to filmmaking. Growing up in England, I had always been interested in the history of the British cinema, but generally my writing on film history has been concentrated on America. I suppose to a certain extent I wanted to go back into my archives,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Holiday Book Roundup—Part 2

I must emphasize once again that what follows is not a roster of reviews, as I have not had time to read these books, but they all pique my interest. That’s why I’m happy to spread the word about them. William Cameron Menzies: The Shape Of Films To Come by James Curtis (Pantheon) This is the book I am most eager to read cover-to-cover. First, it deals with one of my cinematic heroes, production designer (and occasional director) William Cameron Menzies, the man responsible for the look of such varied films as Douglas FairbanksThe Thief of Bagdad, his own Things to Come, and Gone With...

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See full article at Leonard Maltin's Movie Crazy »

Early Black Film Actor Has His Day

Rex Ingram in 'The Thief of Bagdad' 1940 with tiny Sabu. Actor Rex Ingram movies on TCM: Early black film performer in 'Cabin in the Sky,' 'Anna Lucasta' It's somewhat unusual for two well-known film celebrities, whether past or present, to share the same name.* One such rarity is – or rather, are – the two movie people known as Rex Ingram;† one an Irish-born white director, the other an Illinois-born black actor. Turner Classic Movies' “Summer Under the Stars” continues today, Aug. 11, '15, with a day dedicated to the latter. Right now, TCM is showing Cabin in the Sky (1943), an all-black musical adaptation of the Faust tale that is notable as the first full-fledged feature film directed by another Illinois-born movie person, Vincente Minnelli. Also worth mentioning, the movie marked Lena Horne's first important appearance in a mainstream motion picture.§ A financial disappointment on the
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Daily | Il Cinema Ritrovato 2015

Starting today, the 29th edition of Il Cinema Ritrovato, one of the world's major festivals of film restoration, is off and running through July 4. A slew of programs will be presenting masterpieces of the Iranian New Wave, jazz classics, restored work by Charles Chaplin and Buster Keaton, Leo McCarey and Renato Castellani, films Ingrid Bergman made before going to Hollywood, producer Alexander Korda's The Thief of Bagdad (1940), an homage to the festival's late director, Peter von Bagh—and much more. » - David Hudson
See full article at Keyframe »

Interview with Shahin Sean Solimon, writer, director and star of Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage

david j. moore chats with Shahin Sean Solimon, writer, director and star of Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage

Every once in a blue moon a film will come out of nowhere, and Shahin Sean Solimon’s independently financed adventure film Sinbad: The Fifth Voyage was released to theaters in North America for a single week. Those who were lucky enough to catch it theatrically were treated to a long-gone style of filmmaking. Filled with stop motion animated monsters, real sets, an orchestral score, and a tirelessly intrepid ambition to remind viewers of a bygone era, the film hearkened back to the glory days of special effects pioneer Ray Harryhausen, who had contributed indelible, hand-crafted special effects wizardry in films like The 7th Voyage of Sinbad (1958), Jason and the Argonauts (1963), and Sinbad and the Eye of the Tiger (1977). Inspired by Harryhausen’s groundbreaking work, Solimon took it upon himself to write, direct,
See full article at Flickeringmyth »

Which is the greatest British film in history? No one seems to be in agreement

Best British movies of all time? (Image: a young Michael Caine in 'Get Carter') Ten years ago, Get Carter, starring Michael Caine as a dangerous-looking London gangster (see photo above), was selected as the United Kingdom's very best movie of all time according to 25 British film critics polled by Total Film magazine. To say that Mike Hodges' 1971 thriller was a surprising choice would be an understatement. I mean, not a David Lean epic or an early Alfred Hitchcock thriller? What a difference ten years make. On Total Film's 2014 list, published last May, Get Carter was no. 44 among the magazine's Top 50 best British movies of all time. How could that be? Well, first of all, people would be very naive if they took such lists seriously, whether we're talking Total Film, the British Film Institute, or, to keep things British, Sight & Sound magazine. Second, whereas Total Film's 2004 list was the result of a 25-critic consensus,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

See Reddit users’ favorite movie from each year

Throughout the summer, an admin on the r/movies subreddit has been leading Reddit users in a poll of the best movies from every year for the last 100 years called 100 Years of Yearly Cinema. The poll concluded three days ago, and the list of every movie from 1914 to 2013 has been published today.

Users were asked to nominate films from a given year and up-vote their favorite nominees. The full list includes the outright winner along with the first two runners-up from each year. The list is mostly a predictable assortment of IMDb favorites and certified classics, but a few surprise gems have also risen to the top of the crust, including the early experimental documentary Man With a Movie Camera in 1929, Abel Gance’s J’Accuse! in 1919, the Fred Astaire film Top Hat over Alfred Hitchcock’s The 39 Steps in 1935, and Stanley Kubrick’s The Killing over John Ford’s
See full article at SoundOnSight »

Santa Barbara Film Fest To Open With ‘Mission Blue,’ Show Silents for Super Bowl Sunday

  • The Wrap
Santa Barbara Film Fest To Open With ‘Mission Blue,’ Show Silents for Super Bowl Sunday
The 2014 Santa Barbara International Film Festival will open on Jan. 30 with “Mission Blue,” an environmental documentary directed by Robert Nixon and Fisher Stevens, and close on Feb. 9 with screenings of all three films in the Richard Linklater-Julie Delpy-Ethan Hawke “Before” trilogy: “Before Sunrise,” “Before Sunset” and “Before Midnight.” It will also screen “Wings” (above) and “The Thief of Bagdad” as part of a special program of silent movies on Super Bowl Sunday. The festival announced its complete lineup on Tuesday, and will feature 23 world premieres and 31 U.S. premieres. The lineup, some of which was announced previously,
See full article at The Wrap »

Disney 53: Aladdin

Thn’s retrospective of Disney’s Animated Classics continues with Aladdin.

Directed by Ron Clements and John Musker

1992/ 90 Minutes

The idea of adapting the Middle Eastern folk tale “Aladdin” was first proposed by songwriter Howard Ashman in 1988. He and longtime collaborator Alan Menken were working on The Little Mermaid at the time, and production was about to begin on Beauty And The Beast. Ashman wrote an initial treatment for the project and collaborated on six songs with Menken.

After The Little Mermaid was completed, co-directors John Musker and Ron Clements turned their attention to writing a first draft script with Linda Woolverton providing a screenplay. Musker and Clements would go on to direct.

Aladdin was the second Disney animated feature to use fully rendered and textured 3D CGI moving backgrounds, in combination with the traditionally animated character animation, a process experimented on with The Rescuers Down Under and utilised to
See full article at The Hollywood News »
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