Strike Up the Band (1940) - News Poster

News

Will Musicals See a ‘La La Land’ Boost?

Will Musicals See a ‘La La Land’ Boost?
The rap on musicals used to be “audiences don’t want to see people breaking into song.” Now that “La La Land” has charmed audiences by doing just that, what does it mean for the future of live-action screen musicals?

“Whatever musicals come next will have to be good. That’s the test,” says Justin Paul, one of the Oscar-nominated lyricists for “La La Land.” “I have to believe that other studios, other producers, would only be encouraged by the impact of ‘La La Land,’ both critically and at the box office.”

Adds fellow “La La Land” lyricist Benj Pasek: “We feel like our generation has been so primed for musical content. We grew up with the resurgence of Disney animation and all that followed from that. In hindsight, it makes sense that people would be receptive; so many of us grew up with our first stories being told through song.
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Judy by the Numbers: "Our Love Affair"

Anne Marie is tracking Judy Garland's career through musical numbers...

By 1940 it was undeniable: Mickey and Judy were a success. Even more, Mickey and Judy with the Freed Unit behind them were a bona fide hit machine. Babes in Arms, the first Freed Unit collaboration, earned over $2 million domestically and $1 million abroad. With the promise of another blockbuster and the rise of patriotic sentiment on the verge of WWII, Louis B. Mayer dusted off an old, patriotic-sounding title and set his hitmakers on a new project: Strike Up The Band. The Movie: Strike Up The Band (MGM, 1940)

The Songwriters: Arthur Freed & Roger Edens

The Players: Mickey Rooney, Judy Garland, directed by Busby Berkeley

The Story: The original Strike Up The Band was a George & Ira Gershwin political musical satire from the early half of the 1930s. However, the new patriotic musical produced by Arthur Freed & company bore no resemblance
See full article at FilmExperience »

How Sound Film Technology Evolved in the Last Century: Interview with Former UCLA Film Preservationist Gitt

Hal Roach looks on as technicians install Vitaphone equipment in his studio screening room, ca. 1928. (Click on the image to enlarge it.) 'A Century of Sound': Q&A with former UCLA Preservation Officer Robert Gitt about the evolution of film sound technology Long before multi-track Dolby stereo and digital sound technology, there were the Kinetophone and the Vitaphone systems – not to mention organ and piano players at movie houses. Much of that is discussed in A Century of Sound, which chronicles the evolution of film sound from the late 19th century to the mid-1970s. A Century of Sound has been split into two parts, with a third installment currently in the planning stages. They are: Vol. 1, “The Beginning, 1876-1932,” which came out on DVD in 2007. Vol. 2, “The Sound of Movies: 1933-1975,” which came out on Blu-ray in 2015. The third installment will bring the presentation into the 21st century.
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Kimberly Perry Is Married -- Get All the Wedding Details!

  • TooFab
Strike up the band!Kimberly Perry and her beau J.P. Arencibia got married today in Greeneville, Tennessee, sources confirm to toofab.The ceremony is taking place at the First Presbyterian Church. Carrie Underwood and husband Mike Fisher were spotted at the event, while Miranda Lambert and Blake Shelton were rumored to be in attendance.The bride wore a white, sleeveless gown for the big day. The local news station, Wjhl, captured Kimberly in her dress outside the church after the ceremony (above). The Band Perry singer and the Texas Rangers catcher got engaged back in September at Perry's parent's home, according to Us Weekly.The "If I Die Young" songstress had dreamed of getting proposed to under a large oak tree in the yard while wearing a favorite pink dress -- and Arencibia made it come true. He sent Perry inside to change, and her family had a special
See full article at TooFab »

Movie News: Classic Movie Star Mickey Rooney Dies at 93

Hollywood – He was the biggest star the world, the box office champion from 1939 to 1941. “Wow, spanning two decades,” Bart Simpson said. Mickey Rooney lived long enough to work on silent films, be the biggest star in the world and do a voiceover on “The Simpsons.” Not bad for one lifetime. Mickey Rooney died of natural causes in his North Hollywood home on April 6th. He was 93.

Rooney was a actor who worked nearly his entire life in film, television and stage. His active career as a performer spanned 92 years, and he was one of the last few in history to have worked in the silent film era. His filmography lists over 200 roles, and he also appeared in vaudeville, on Broadway and several television series. He outlived and outperformed virtually all the classic movie stars from Hollywood’s golden era of the studio system from the 1930s to the 1950s.

The
See full article at HollywoodChicago.com »

Silver Screen legend Mickey Rooney dead at 93

  • Hitfix
Silver Screen legend Mickey Rooney dead at 93
Los Angeles (AP) — Mickey Rooney, the pint-size, precocious actor and all-around talent whose more than 80-year career spanned silent comedies, Shakespeare, Judy Garland musicals, Andy Hardy stardom, television and the Broadway theater, died Sunday at age 93. Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said that Rooney was with his family when he died at his North Hollywood home. Smith said police took a death report but indicated that there was nothing suspicious and it was not a police case. He said he had no additional details on the circumstances of his passing. Rooney started his career in his parents' vaudeville act while still a toddler, and broke into movies before age 10. He was still racking up film and TV credits more than 80 years later — a tenure likely unmatched in the history of show business. "I always say, 'Don't retire — inspire,'" he told The Associated Press in March 2008. "There's a lot to be done.
See full article at Hitfix »

Mickey Rooney, Legendary Actor, Dies at 93

Mickey Rooney, Legendary Actor, Dies at 93
Mickey Rooney, the pint-sized actor who was one of MGM’s giant box office attractions in the late ’30s and early ’40s, has died, sources confirm. He was 93.

As adept at comedy as drama and an excellent singer and dancer, Rooney was regarded as the consummate entertainer. During a prolific career on stage and screen that spanned eight decades (“I’ve been working all my life, but it seems longer,” he once said), he was nominated for four Academy Awards and received two special Oscars, the Juvenile Award in 1939 (shared with Deanna Durbin) and one in 1983 for his body of work.

He also appeared on series and TV and in made for television movies, one of which, “Bill,” the touching story of a mentally challenged man, won him an Emmy. He was Emmy nominated three other times. And for “Sugar Babies,” a musical revue in which he starred with Ann Miller,
See full article at Variety - Film News »

Mickey Rooney Dead -- Legendary Actor Dies at 93

  • TMZ
Mickey Rooney, who spent nearly his entire life in show business, died today. He was 93. Rooney had been in ill health for quite some time.  We're told death was attributed to natural causes.He was one of the most famous child actors in entertainment history. He played the role of Andy Hardy in more than a dozen classic MGM films.Rooney also teamed up with Judy Garland for "Babes in Arms" which was a huge
See full article at TMZ »

Mickey Rooney Dead: Legendary Actor Dies at 93

  • Moviefone
Anthony McCartney, AP Entertainment Writer

Los Angeles (AP) - Mickey Rooney, the pint-size, precocious actor and all-around talent whose more than 80-year career spanned silent comedies, Shakespeare, Judy Garland musicals, Andy Hardy stardom, television and the Broadway theater, died Sunday at age 93.

Los Angeles Police Commander Andrew Smith said that Rooney was with his family when he died at his North Hollywood home.

Smith said police took a death report but indicated that there was nothing suspicious and he had no additional details on the circumstances of his passing. The Los Angeles County Coroner's office said it was not their case because Rooney died a natural death.

There were no further immediate details on the cause of death, but Rooney did attend an Oscar party last month.

Rooney started his career in his parents' vaudeville act while still a toddler, and broke into movies before age 10. He was still racking
See full article at Moviefone »

You'll Be Humming This Christmas "Carol"

Despite never having a full hour devoted to a Christmas special, CBS has found (apparently) enough episodes and sketches to release a Christmas with Carol edition of The Carol Burnett Show. The sketches are heavy on Christmas scenarios and the color red while still showcasing Burnett’s brand of humor. And, of course, nothing says Christmas like a bounty of musical numbers.

As far as sketches go, the Alan Alda episode is more or less solid (if you have the patience for much longer sketches than you’d find on SNL). From a dysfunctional family Christmas to a Holiday song with Alda as Santa, Carol is sure to put you in the holiday spirit (especially with the amusing gift-giving in the opening Q&A). The other full episode in this small set includes some great song and dance numbers including Helen Reddy’s “Blue” (which has dancers dressed as Christmas
See full article at JustPressPlay »

Kimberly Perry Engaged to Baseball Star J.P. Arencibia After Romantic Proposal

Kimberly Perry Engaged to Baseball Star J.P. Arencibia After Romantic Proposal
Strike up the band! Kimberly Perry is engaged to J.P. Arencibia, her rep confirms to Us Weekly. The Tennessean was the first to report on the happy news. According to the newspaper, The Band Perry singer, 30, accepted the Toronto Blue Jays catcher's proposal on Monday, Sept. 30. Winning the approval of Perry's family -- including brothers/bandmates Neil and Reid Perry -- Arencibia, 27, surprised his girlfriend at her parents' home in Greeneville, Tenn. The "If I Die Young" singer had dreamed of getting proposed to under a [...]
See full article at Us Weekly »

Lots of Rooney Flicks Today

Mickey Rooney movie schedule (Pt): TCM on August 13 See previous post: “Mickey Rooney Movies: Music and Murder.” Photo: Mickey Rooney ca. 1940. 3:00 Am Death On The Diamond (1934). Director: Edward Sedgwick. Cast: Robert Young, Madge Evans, Nat Pendleton, Mickey Rooney. Bw-71 mins. 4:15 Am A Midsummer Night’S Dream (1935). Director: Max Reinhardt and William Dieterle. Cast: James Cagney, Dick Powell, Olivia de Havilland, Ross Alexander, Anita Louise, Mickey Rooney, Joe E. Brown, Victor Jory, Ian Hunter, Verree Teasdale, Jean Muir, Frank McHugh, Grant Mitchell, Hobart Cavanaugh, Dewey Robinson, Hugh Herbert, Arthur Treacher, Otis Harlan, Helen Westcott, Fred Sale, Billy Barty, Rags Ragland. Bw-143 mins. 6:45 Am A Family Affair (1936). Director: George B. Seitz. Cast: Mickey Rooney, Lionel Barrymore, Cecilia Parker, Eric Linden. Bw-69 mins. 8:00 Am Boys Town (1938). Director: Norman Taurog. Cast: Spencer Tracy, Mickey Rooney, Henry Hull, Leslie Fenton, Gene Reynolds, Edward Norris, Addison Richards, Minor Watson, Jonathan Hale,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Rooney Goes from All-American Small Town Boy to Criminal Suspect

Mickey Rooney movies on TCM: Music and murder (photo: Mickey Rooney and Judy Garland ca. 1940) Mickey Rooney is Turner Classic Movies’ "Summer Under the Stars" star today, August 13, 2013. According to the IMDb, Mickey Rooney, who turns 93 next September 23, has been featured in more than 250 movies — in shorts and features, in Hollywood and international productions, in cameos and starring roles, in bit parts and second leads. You name it, Rooney has done it: comedies, dramas, thrillers, musicals, biopics, war movies, horse movies, horror movies. (Mickey Rooney: TCM movie schedule.) Mickey Rooney in a horror movie? Yes, in about a dozen of those. Scarier than World War Z, The Conjuring, The Exorcist, and Alien combined were A Family Affair (on TCM earlier today) and ensuing Andy Hardy movies. Creepy stuff. Nearly as frightening are Rooney’s musicals with Judy Garland, one of which TCM presented earlier this morning, Strike Up the Band (1940). Another,
See full article at Alt Film Guide »

Frank Thornton obituary

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard,
See full article at The Guardian - TV News »

Frank Thornton obituary

Actor best known as the haughty department store supervisor Captain Peacock in the TV comedy Are You Being Served?

The actor Frank Thornton, who has died aged 92, had a flair for comedy derived from the subtle craftsmanship of classical stage work. However, he will be best remembered for his longstanding characters in two popular BBC television comedy series – the sniffily priggish Captain Peacock in Are You Being Served? and the pompous retired policeman Herbert "Truly" Truelove, in Roy Clarke's Last of the Summer Wine.

Robertson Hare, the great Whitehall farceur, told him: "You'll never do any good until you're 40." And, said Thornton, "he was quite right." In the event, he was 51 when David Croft, producer of another long-running British staple, Dad's Army, remembered the tall, long-faced actor from another engagement and decided to cast him as the dapper floor-walker in charge of shop assistants played by Mollie Sugden, Wendy Richard,
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »

‘Treme’s Five-Episode Final Season A Go

The long-rumored abbreviated fourth season of HBO’s New Orleans drama Treme is a reality. “Strike up the band. Production on the 5-episode final season of Treme begins November 5th,” the show announced on its Facebook page this afternoon. HBO confirmed the order, which will end the series’ run. Treme co-creator David Simon told a New Orleans crowd last month that “we are going to be back for a season 3.5. HBO, upon viewing the 10 (episodes from Season 3) that we gave them and what we’ve done, they want to see the end of the story. They fought very hard to give us half a loaf. We’re going to take it and run.”
See full article at Deadline TV »

2012 Golden Globe Awards Live Blog: Winners and Commentary

Welcome to our live blog of the 2012 Golden Globe Awards where myself and Laremy Legel will be providing running commentary and up-to-the-minute winner announcements over the course of nearly five straight hours of Golden Globe excitement. This is the sixth year in a row we have provided a live blog of the events and hopefully this will be our best yet.

Over the course of the evening Laremy and I will be providing commentary, quotes, winners and anything else that comes to mind. I will be breaking things up on an hourly basis, providing a page break at the end of each hour to hopefully keep things manageable.

Also, in the right hand column you will notice I have placed a list of the winners, which will update live as they are announced, and if you feel as if you need a breather from the live blog, you can also
See full article at Rope Of Silicon »

‘The Muppets’ – honors both the fans and the legacy

The Muppets

Directed by James Bobin

Written by Jason Segal and Nicholas Stoller, based on characters created by Jim Henson

imdb USA 2011

The central difficulty with reviving a beloved franchise like The Muppets is that what you gain in brand recognition, you lose in the established fan-base’s resistance to change. Keeping the older fans happy while pleasing new fans is a tricky tightrope to walk. The Muppets one big advantage over a franchise like Star Trek is that it is something that today’s parents loved as kids and that they are really looking forward to introducing to their children. That was certainly the case at the preview screening that I attended.

The Muppets come to theatres boasting the best marketing of any film this year. The clever, parody Muppet movie trailers have excited long-time fans of the Muppets and created new fans. At the same time, older fans
See full article at SoundOnSight »

‘The Muppets’ honors both the fans and the legacy

The Muppets

Directed by James Bobin

Written by Jason Segal and Nicholas Stoller, based on characters created by Jim Henson

USA, 2011

The central difficulty with reviving a beloved franchise like The Muppets is that what you gain in brand recognition, you lose in the established fan-base’s resistance to change. Keeping the older fans happy while pleasing new fans is a tricky tightrope to walk. The Muppets one big advantage over a franchise like Star Trek is that it is something that today’s parents loved as kids and that they are really looking forward to introducing to their children. That was certainly the case at the preview screening that I attended.

The Muppets come to theatres boasting the best marketing of any film this year. The clever, parody Muppet movie trailers have excited long-time fans of the Muppets and created new fans. At the same time, older fans are
See full article at SoundOnSight »

MGM musicals: All singing, all dancing

MGM meant musicals for more than a decade after the second world war. David Thomson looks at a time when a little cheer at the movies was appreciated – and wonders if the same couldn't be said now

There had been musicals before. In the 1930s, as soon as sound permitted, Warner Brothers developed what we call the Busby Berkeley pictures: they were black and white, and often aware of the harsh Depression times, but a choreographic lather of girls and fluid, orgasmic forms where the camera was itching to plunge into the centre of the "big O" – think of Footlight Parade, Gold Diggers of 1933 or 42nd Street. They had aerial shots of waves and whirlpools of chorus girls, opening and closing their legs in time with our desire. A few years later, at Rko Pictures, the Astaire-Rogers films came into being – where the gravity, beauty, and exhilaration of the
See full article at The Guardian - Film News »
loading
An error has occured. Please try again.

See also

Showtimes | External Sites