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South of the Boudoir (1940)

Charley, over his wife's objections, has invited his boss over for dinner. Mrs. Chase walks out, and Charley hires a waitress to pose as his wife. Meanwhile, the boss picks up Mrs. Chase ... See full summary »

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(screen play), (screen play) | 1 more credit »
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Cast

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Charley Chase
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Hazel
...
Mrs. Charley Chase
Arthur Q. Bryan ...
Thomas Bailey
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Storyline

Charley, over his wife's objections, has invited his boss over for dinner. Mrs. Chase walks out, and Charley hires a waitress to pose as his wife. Meanwhile, the boss picks up Mrs. Chase and brings her as his dinner guest. Written by Les Adams <longhorn1939@suddenlink.net>

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This way to some of the heartiest laughs that ever rocked you from head to toe! (Title lobby card).

Genres:

Comedy | Short

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Release Date:

17 May 1940 (USA)  »

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Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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This is the last film appearance of Charley Chase. See more »

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17 July 2010 | by (New York City) – See all my reviews

This very late Charley Chase film -- it was the last released while he was alive --reworks the themes from ASSISTANT WIVES, but don't be cross. Chase would redo his films every eight years or so and vary them consistently to produce something fresh each time. Here he gets into a lovely plate-throwing routine with Ann Doran before she walks out on him -- and boss Arthur Q. Bryan is coming to dinner, doing his Elmer Fudd voice -- although never credited, since Mel Blanc had sole screen credit, it was Bryan who did Fudd, and boy, does he look and act like him, even with no obvious mansion or yacht.

This is a very oddly timed short for Chase, who usually worked at a slower and more deliberate pace. On the other hand, it's quite a bit slower than the usual Columbia short, as people lose their tempers quickly, but always with reason. The collaboration with director Del Lord might have managed something interesting in this line, but alas, they never had the chance to get much further.


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