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Night Train to Munich (1940) Poster

Quotes

Charters: I bought a copy of Mein Kampf. Occurred to me it might shed a spot of light on all this... how d'ye do. Ever read it?

Caldicott: Never had the time.

Charters: I understand they give a copy to all the bridal couples over here.

Caldicott: Oh, I don't think it's that sort of book, old man.

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Kampenfeldt: [trying to decide the guilt of someone accused of treason - downbeat] This is a fine country to live in.

[upbeat]

Kampenfeldt: This is a *fine* country to live in.

[to camera]

Kampenfeldt: This is a bloody awful country to live in!

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Anna Bomasch: You know, if a woman ever loved you like you love yourself, it would be one of the great romances of history!

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Charters: [at newsstand, next to display of "Mein Kampf" and "Gone With the Wind"] There's not a copy of this week's "Punch" ?

Saleswoman: Please ?

Charters: "Punch." English magazine. Very humorous. You must have a copy.

Saleswoman: No.

Charters: [to Caldicott] She hasn't got a "Punch" old man.

Caldicott: Hasn't she ?

Charters: No.

Caldicott: Well. Sold out I suppose.

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Charters: They've got "La Vie Parisienne" old boy.

Caldicott: "La Vie Parisienne" ? All right. Don't bother about a "Punch."

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Station Master: [to Charters and Caldicott who are sitting on a baggage cart] You can't sit here.

Charters: Why not ?

Station Master: This truck is required. Come on. Off, off, off, off, off, off.

Charters: I suppose these bags aren't required too ?

Station Master: Off, off, off, off, off, off, off.

Charters: Pushed about from pillar to post by this railway ever since we got on the train.

Caldicott: Yeah, everything we sit on seems to be required.

Charters: It's monstrous.

Caldicott: We shall write to the company about this. You're not at war with England yet, you know.

Station Master: But you are mistaken. France declared war this afternoon. Und England declared war this morning. So ! Achtung !

Charters: War...

Caldicott: Yes.

Charters: Good heavens !

Caldicott: What's the matter ?

Charters: My golf clubs.

Caldicott: Where are they ?

Charters: I lent them to Max in Berlin. Like a fool, I said he needn't bring them back til next Wednesday... Probably seen the last of them.

Caldicott: Yes. I expect they'll require them for something or other.

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Kampenfeldt: It's been reported to me that you've been heard experessing sentiments hostile to the fatherland!

Schwab: What - me, sir?

Kampenfeldt: I warn you, Schwab, this treasonable conduct will lead you to a concentration camp.

Schwab: But, sir, what did I say?

Kampenfeldt: You were distinctly heard to remark,

[sarcastic]

Kampenfeldt: "This is a fine country to live in."

Schwab: Oh no, sir. There's some mistake. What I said was,

[upbeat]

Schwab: "This is a FINE country to live in!"

Kampenfeldt: Uh? You sure?

Schwab: Yes, sir.

Kampenfeldt: Huh. I see. Well in future don't make remarks that can be taken two ways.

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Kampenfeldt: [trying to identify signature on letter of reference] Looks rather like Stuckner. But I believe he is doing diplomatic work in the Balkans.

Gus Bennett: And who is not ?

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Capt. Prada: One moment, Major. You will be surprised to hear that Bomasch is no longer in England.

Gus Bennett: What ?

Capt. Prada: He was brought back to Germany only a few hours ago. In fact, he's in this building now.

Gus Bennett: But this completely alters my plans. Perhaps you can arrange for me to see Herr Bomasch at once.

Capt. Prada: I'm afraid it's impossible. He's with the controller.

Gus Bennett: But surely there's no harm in my asking him a few questions.

Capt. Prada: It's beyond my province, Major. I'll pass you on to Captain Viengarten, but frankly I don't think it will get you any further. The controller's office is rather like the kingdom of heaven. And if anything, a little more exclusive.

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Karl Marsen: In time you will see things the way I do. The way everyone in Germany does.

Anna Bomasch: I'm not a German.

Karl Marsen: Germany is as much your country as it is ours now. We don't hate the Czechs. We only wish to protect them.

Anna Bomasch: As you're protecting the people of Poland ?

Karl Marsen: You've been too long in Britain, listening to their smug hypocrisy !

Anna Bomasch: If I listened to hypocrisy in Britain, it was not from the British.

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Controller: I thought it unwise to speak in front of Bomasch. So far we've made no impression on him.

Gus Bennett: [who is pretending to be Major Herzoff] I do not agree. He looks ten years older.

Controller: My orders are to obtain quick results.

Gus Bennett: At the Reich, we are rather inclined to believe that the knuckle-duster is the best diplomatic weapon.

Controller: Do I understand that you question ?

Gus Bennett: I question nothing. I am an army officer.

Admiral Hassinger: Personally, I do not follow any of this at all.

Gus Bennett: Bomasch is not the man to be bullied into cooperation, sir.

Controller: Well, what do you suggest ?

Gus Bennett: I knew Fraulein Bomasch in Prague.

[Looks knowingly at Admiral Hassinger]

Gus Bennett: She has a great influence with her father and is the one person who can make him change his mind.

Controller: Oh, Marsen here has tried that but she refused to listen. He is largely responsible for tracing Bomasch in England, completely outwitting the British military intelligence.

Gus Bennett: [to Marsen] So, may I express a soldier's admiration for one who can carry out his mission under the very eyes of the enemy secret service ?

Karl Marsen: Thank you, sir.

Gus Bennett: But, if I may say so, I hardly think the captain is a suitable person to influence the lady.

Controller: And who do you think would be more suitable ?

Gus Bennett: Why, uh, myself for instance.

Controller: You ?

Gus Bennett: Why not ?

Admiral Hassinger: Herzoff was very friendly with her in Prague, you know.

Gus Bennett: A little more than friendly. You saw the way she looked at me when I came in.

Admiral Hassinger: Oh yes, of course. Seems to me that you are a bit of a dog, Herzoff.

Gus Bennett: A technician, Admiral. One does not talk about these things.

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Gus Bennett: Are you sure it was Gus Bennett they said ?

Anna Bomasch: Yes, I'm certain.

Gus Bennett: Your father's not in the song business ?

Anna Bomasch: No.

Gus Bennett: Well, it's beyond me. How did you lose him ?

Anna Bomasch: He escaped.

Gus Bennett: He escaped ? You mean, he's still at large ?

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Admiral Hassinger: You really believe that you can influence a girl in a matter of hours ?

Gus Bennett: Shall we say... overnight ?

Admiral Hassinger: I see.

Karl Marsen: Knowing Fraulein Bomasch, sir, I doubt whether even his qualities will make any impression on her.

Gus Bennett: You aren't acquainted with my qualities.

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Gus Bennett: [enters Anna's hotel room] My darling, you look as charming as ever. Those same sweet lips, like warm carnations. Those sweet mysterious eyes, darker and softer than the bluest dusk of August violets... as the poet has it, and I hope he was Aryan... No one under the bed, I trust ?

[picks up phone]

Gus Bennett: Bring me a bottle of Krug '28... That will be excellent.

Anna Bomasch: What's happening ?

Gus Bennett: Well you may have gathered that we were partners in a highly romantic interlude in Prague four years ago. By the way, did you like the flowers ?

Anna Bomasch: Does that matter ?

Gus Bennett: It cost me twelve coupons.

Anna Bomasch: Well, go on.

Gus Bennett: Well, tomorrow morning I'm going to phone the admiral and say that your father is now prepared to work for Germany.

Anna Bomasch: What ?

Gus Bennett: I shall say that I persuaded you to reason with him. They're bound to ask me to take you both along. The Gestapo man downstairs will let us pass and then...

Anna Bomasch: Yes, but how do you know he will ?

Gus Bennett: They listen in to the phone. They always do. Then instead of driving to the admiralty, we shall go to a meadow outside Berlin where a plane is waiting.

Anna Bomasch: I see. But why should the admiralty believe that you've persuaded me ?

Gus Bennett: I shall indicate that, uh, once again you've succumbed to my charms.

Anna Bomasch: Once... again ?

Gus Bennett: It happened in Prague, I'm afraid.

Anna Bomasch: And you told them a fantastic story like that ?

Gus Bennett: Fantastic ? Well it was four years ago, there was a harvest moon and I was younger and more dashing then.

Anna Bomasch: But you really mean all this ? It sounds far too simple.

Gus Bennett: I have a very simple mind. But there is one small complication. Uh, I shall have to spend the night here - in a purely professional spirit, of course.

Anna Bomasch: That is necessary ?

Gus Bennett: Well, sort of fits into the picture. The place is absolutely crawling with Gestapo... Have you any sporting instinct ?

Anna Bomasch: Why ?

Gus Bennett: Well, I'll, uh, toss you who sleeps on the couch.

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Karl Marsen: We have nothing to fear. The nation is behind the fuhrer.

Axel Bomasch: Yes, but how far behind the fuhrer ?

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Anna Bomasch: [sees her letter to Marsen in Bennett's hand] Where did you get that ?

Gus Bennett: Post office stopped it.

Anna Bomasch: Why ?

Gus Bennett: I gave them instructions.

Anna Bomasch: What have my private letters to do with you ?

Gus Bennett: A postmark's a dangerous thing.

Anna Bomasch: This letter's to a friend of mine.

Gus Bennett: British ?

Anna Bomasch: No.

Gus Bennett: Refugee ?

Anna Bomasch: I'm not going to be cross-examined.

Gus Bennett: I must remind you that the government pay me a wage - small but regular, to look after your father.

Anna Bomasch: It's obviously not small enough.

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Gus Bennett: [to bellhop who delivered champagne] Is anything the matter ?

Bellhop: That tune you were whistling, sir - it's an English tune, isn't it ?

Gus Bennett: How do you know ?

Bellhop: I heard it on the radio from London last night.

Gus Bennett: Are you not aware that listening to the foreign broadcasts is forbidden ? That there is a strict penalty ?

Bellhop: Oh, I'm sorry sir.

Gus Bennett: I will not report you on this occasion but see that you are more discreet in future. Get out.

[bellhop leaves]

Gus Bennett: Very awkward.

Anna Bomasch: Lucky it wasn't "Rule, Britannia."

Gus Bennett: I handled it rather neatly, I thought.

Anna Bomasch: You know, if a woman ever loved you like you love yourself, it would be one of the romances in history.

Gus Bennett: As I'm unlikely to think of an adequate reply to that, I think we ought to drink a toast. England expects that every secret service man this night shall do his duty.

[opens champagne but there is no pop]

Gus Bennett: Flat.

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Gus Bennett: Have you ever heard of an organized escape ?

Anna Bomasch: Organized ?

Gus Bennett: To lead them to your father.

Anna Bomasch: But that's fantastic. Karl doesn't even know where I am.

Gus Bennett: Are you sure of that ?

Anna Bomasch: Of course. I told no one.

Gus Bennett: Good. Honestly, I don't want to throw a monkey wrench into the romance.

Anna Bomasch: Thank you. I appreciate that you're inspired by the highest motives and that you'll go to any lengths to pursue them.

Gus Bennett: Any lengths.

Anna Bomasch: Even to exhibiting yourself in public as a singer.

Gus Bennett: Well, nature endowed me with a gift and I just accepted it. That's all.

Anna Bomasch: It's a pity it didn't endow you with a voice. Nothing that happened to me in that concentration camp was quite as dreadful as listening to you day after day singing those appalling songs.

Gus Bennett: With those few words, you've knocked the bottom out of my entire existence.

Anna Bomasch: A pity I only knocked it.

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Caldicott: [Looking through papers in stationmaster's office] It's all in German.

Charters: [to telephone operator] What ? Well, how long then ? Oh, alright.

[to Caldicott]

Charters: Blasted junction's engaged by the military. They'll call me back.

Caldicott: These people seem to have no idea of business as usual.

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Controller: We can't afford to waste time.

[to Admiral Hassinger]

Controller: You didn't give him permission to travel with the prisoners, did you sir ?

Admiral Hassinger: No, no. But he may have assumed it. If you remember, we more or less gave him carte blanche.

Controller: The only thing is to check up with the War Office, sir.

Admiral Hassinger: I suppose so.

Controller: [picks up phone] War Office.

Admiral Hassinger: If he's right, this will be very serious for you, Kampfeldt.

Controller: Very serious indeed.

Capt. Prada: That letter was addressed to you. There's no denying that, Kampfeldt.

Kampenfeldt: Quite right. I'm afraid I shall have to sack my secretary.

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Karl Marsen: I'm afraid I must ask you to drop this little comedy. It's very entertaining but I have certain formalities to attend to.

Anna Bomasch: Comedy ? What do you mean ?

[hands tea to Bennett]

Gus Bennett: Oh, thank you.

Karl Marsen: You're merely pretending to be infatuated with this man. There's no such person as Major Herzoff. He's a British agent trying to get you and your father out of Germany.

Anna Bomasch: You must be crazy.

[to Bennett]

Anna Bomasch: Ulrich !

Gus Bennett: I don't propose to waste the time of the Gestapo denying it.

Karl Marsen: Thank you.

Axel Bomasch: You, you're going to give yourself up ?

Gus Bennett: Well, they have lots of proof, Mr. Bomasch.

Karl Marsen: An escort will be waiting at Munich to take you in charge.

Anna Bomasch: You can't do this.

Karl Marsen: He's an enemy agent.

Anna Bomasch: Weren't you ? Didn't you do exactly the same as he's doing ?

Karl Marsen: With a slight but important difference. _I_ wasn't caught.

Anna Bomasch: [to Bennett] Are you just going to sit there and do nothing ?

Gus Bennett: Now, please don't make a scene.

Anna Bomasch: Don't you realize what this means ?

Gus Bennett: Yes, I do. But he has a gun and I haven't. And he's got a couple of reserves next door. Who do you take me for - Bulldog Drummond ?

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Soldier: If there's more than one major on the train, how are we to know which one to arrest ?

Gestapo Officer: Our man has a Gestapo officer watching him.

Soldier: Hmpf. Who has not these days ?

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Charters: Traitor? Hardly, old man. He played for the Gentlemen. Only once.

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