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The Man with Nine Lives (1940)

 -  Mystery | Sci-Fi  -  18 April 1940 (USA)
6.4
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Ratings: 6.4/10 from 297 users  
Reviews: 21 user | 11 critic

A medical researcher visits the deserted home of a pioneer in cryogenic science who disappeared 10 years earlier and finds him frozen in ice but still alive.

Director:

(as Nick Grindé)

Writers:

(screen play), (story)
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Title: The Man with Nine Lives (1940)

The Man with Nine Lives (1940) on IMDb 6.4/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Roger Pryor ...
Jo Ann Sayers ...
Stanley Brown ...
John Dilson ...
John Hawthorne
Hal Taliaferro ...
Byron Foulger ...
Charles Trowbridge ...
Ernie Adams ...
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Storyline

Dr. Leon Kravaal develops a potential cure for cancer, which involves freezing the patient. But an experiment goes awry when authorities believe Kravaal has killed a patient. Kravaal freezes the officials, along with himself. Years later, they are discovered and revived in hopes that Kravaal can indeed complete his cure. But human greed and weakness compound to disrupt the project. Written by Jim Beaver <jumblejim@prodigy.net>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

He kills in the name of science...Tombs of ice for the living...Chambers of horror for the dead! See more »

Genres:

Mystery | Sci-Fi

Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

18 April 1940 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Man with Nine Lives  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Part of the SON OF SHOCK package of 21 titles released to television in 1958, which followed the original SHOCK THEATER release of 52 features one year earlier. This was also one of the 12 Columbia titles, the other 61 all being Universals. See more »

Goofs

When Dr. Mason uses the "standard" method of reviving Dr. Kravaal, it doesn't appear to be anything more than placing him near a fire and putting blankets on him. He asks his nurse for "more coffee," but it's unclear what he's doing with the coffee which would help him resuscitate the doctor as Kravaal is unconscious and can't be drinking it. See more »

Quotes

[first lines]
opening title card scroll: Added to the many miracles performed by modern science that have accounted for the saving of thousands upon thousands of human beings, comes its newest and most modern discovery - frozen therapy. ¶Estimates of how long frozen therapy can produce a state of suspended animation range from days to years. But on the fact that disease can be arrested - that life can be prolonged, by freezing human beings in ice, the medical world agrees. ¶In research hospitals today, men and women are ...
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User Reviews

My Favorite of the Columbia Mad Doctor Series
4 October 2004 | by (Beltsville, Maryland) – See all my reviews

As a science fiction and shudder story buff, I thought this was the best of Karloff's Columbia "B" pictures. The "Black Room" (1935), "Behind the Mask" (1932), "The Devil Commands" (1941) (Probably my second favorite), "The Man They Could Not Hang" (1939) (Probably a close third favorite), and "Before I Hang" (1940). In terms of special effects and plot outline, this one keeps you on the edge of your seat to the very end.

The laboratory scenes in the proximity of a large underground glacier are unique. The chemistry lab including the "heavily concentrated poisons" is hair-raising indeed. With the right combination of lighting and shadow, as Karloff prepares the chemical experiments, the scenes within the underground laboratory are extremely eerie.

The maddest doctor of them all was clearly Boris Karloff.

Worth watching many times.


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