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Kitty Foyle (1940) Poster

(1940)

Trivia

Among the many letters that Ginger Rogers received for her work in the film, this was the one that she treasured the most: "Hello Cutie - Saw "Kitty" last night and must write this note to say "That's it!" Yes, yes, a thousand times yes! You were superb Ginge - it was such a solid performance - the kind one seldom sees on stage or screen and it should bring you the highest honors anyone can win!! Hope to see you soon, As ever your, Fred."
The dress that Ginger Rogers wore to that year's Academy Awards caused quite stir. Its lingerie-style top was deemed to be very racy for the day.
After Ginger Rogers' Oscar win for this film, she returned to RKO and was greeted by staffers and actors in top hats and tails.
Ginger Rogers was initially reluctant to take on the lead role, as the novel the film was based on contained explicit sexuality and Kitty has an abortion in it. Rogers' mother advised her to wait until she sees a screenplay before making up her mind, pointing out that the production code wouldn't allow most of the material Rogers found objectionable to be seen in films anyway. Sure enough, the adapted screenplay was "clean" enough for Rogers.
Ginger Rogers wore a dress in the film which instantly became so popular that to this day, the style is known within the garment trade as a Kitty Foyle dress. Characteristically, this would be a sleeved dress in black or navy with a white or ecru collar and cuffs.
Katharine Hepburn was first offered the lead role but turned it down.
Ginger Rogers would listen to Tchaikovsky's Romeo and Juliet in her dressing room to get her into the mood for her sad scenes.
This was RKO's biggest hit of 1940, earning $869,000 in profits.
"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on May 5, 1941 with Ginger Rogers, Dennis Morgan and James Craig reprising their film roles.
"Academy Award Theater" broadcast a 30 minute radio adaptation of the movie on April 6, 1946 with Ginger Rogers reprising her film role.
One of two 1940 Best Film nominees to be set in Philadelphia (though not necessarily filmed there). The other of course was The Philadelphia Story (1940).
Re-released in 1955.
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