His Girl Friday
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20 items from 2010


'Marry Me': Lucy Liu gets physical in romantic comedy debut

11 December 2010 8:44 PM, PST | Zap2It - From Inside the Box | See recent Zap2It - From Inside the Box news »

Lucy Liu may star in Lifetime's two-part miniseries "Marry Me" (Sunday and Monday, Dec. 12-13 at 9 p.m. Et) -- about a woman who receives three marriage proposals and has to pick her one Prince Charming -- but the actress hasn't really given her own wedding day much thought.

"It's not so much to me about the fairy tale wedding as it is about meeting the right person," she tells the press to promote her romantic comedy debut. "I think if you ended up wearing a paper bag and ate pizza for the reception, you wouldn't really care because you'd be so happy because you were with the right person."

That viewpoint plays out in "Marry Me" for Rae Ann Carter (Liu), a social worker who's ignored her dreams of becoming an artist and feels that it's time to settle down ... but not settle for less than the perfect person for her. »

- editorial@zap2it.com

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Review: Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part 1

25 November 2010 5:40 PM, PST | Clothes on Film | See recent Clothes on Film news »

When news broke that the last installment of Harry Potter was to be released as two separate films, cynical groans echoed around the world. Plus it was going to be in 3D, but Warner Bros thankfully pulled the plug on the much-maligned post-shoot conversion to deliver it in glorious 2D instead – for Part 1 anyway.

Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows: Part 1 picks up at the very end of The Half Blood Prince with Harry still ravaged by guilt over the death of Professor Dumbledore. Ron and Hermione join Harry to find the last remaining Horcruxes in order to destroy Lord Voldermort’s (Ralph Fiennes) immortality. Meanwhile, Voldermort and the Dark Arts are murdering mudbloods so as to create an Aryan-style wizard nation within the Ministry of Magic. Got that? No, well never mind.

This is a film for confirmed Potter fans – books or films. If you decide to join in fresh now, »

- Chris Laverty

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Spotting the Difference: From Campbell's 'Who Goes There?' to Carpenter's 'The Thing'

17 September 2010 5:45 AM, PDT | Moviefone | See recent Moviefone news »

Filed under: Features, Horror, Sci-Fi, Cinematical

The art of adaptation is just that; an art. Adapting a short story, a novel, or even a novella takes a finely honed sense of what worked in the adapted material, of what drew readers and, presumably, a movie studio to purchase the film rights, and what works on the big or small screen. Of the three, the novel is generally the most difficult to adapt, the short story second hardest (because so many details and backstory have to be created from scratch), and that makes the novella, with its limited page count and linear story, usually minus subplots, perfect or near-perfect for the big - or small - screen jump.

John W. Campbell's 1938 science-fiction/horror novella, 'Who Goes There?,' has been adapted twice for the big screen, first, loosely, as 'The Thing from Another World,' produced and ghost-directed by Howard Hawks ('Rio Bravo, »

- Mel Valentin

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Spotting the Difference: From Campbell's 'Who Goes There?' to Carpenter's 'The Thing'

17 September 2010 5:45 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

Filed under: Features, Horror, Sci-Fi, Cinematical

The art of adaptation is just that; an art. Adapting a short story, a novel, or even a novella takes a finely honed sense of what worked in the adapted material, of what drew readers and, presumably, a movie studio to purchase the film rights, and what works on the big or small screen. Of the three, the novel is generally the most difficult to adapt, the short story second hardest (because so many details and backstory have to be created from scratch), and that makes the novella, with its limited page count and linear story, usually minus subplots, perfect or near-perfect for the big - or small - screen jump.

John W. Campbell's 1938 science-fiction/horror novella, 'Who Goes There?,' has been adapted twice for the big screen, first, loosely, as 'The Thing from Another World,' produced and ghost-directed by Howard Hawks ('Rio Bravo, »

- Mel Valentin

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Who's That Girl? (Episode 9)

18 August 2010 3:40 PM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

Five beautiful honeys. Can you name the girl and the film?

A [Highlight for the answer] Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday guessed by Julien

B [Highlight for answer] Uma Thurman in Paycheck guessed by Remy

C [Highlight for the answer] Cameron Diaz in The Mask guessed by Remy & The Film Junkie

D [Highlight for the answer] Susan Sarandon in Light Sleeper guessed by Rodrigo

E [Highlight for answer] Anne Baxter in I Confess guessed by Graeme

Good luck! »

- NATHANIEL R

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Scenes We Love: The Thing From Another World

18 August 2010 10:48 AM, PDT | Cinematical | See recent Cinematical news »

John W. Campbell, Jr.'s 1938 seminal science-fiction/horror novella, Who Goes There?, has been adapted twice for the big screen, once, loosely, in 1951 as The Thing from Another World and the second time more faithfully in 1982 as The Thing (a.k.a. John Carpenter's The Thing). While the second adaptation relied heavily on state-of-the-art practical effects, heavy on the body horror, blood, and gore (along with claustrophobia and paranoia, of course), producer and ghost-director Howard Hawks (Rio Bravo, Red River, The Big Sleep, His Girl Friday) structured The Thing from Another World as a moody, atmospheric horror film, relying primarily on suspense, tension, and audience imagination to create a memorable theatrical experience.

Set at a research station in the Arctic (as opposed to Antarctica in Campbell's novella and Carpenter's 1982 adaptation), The Thing from Another World centers on the first encounter between humanity and an alien from outer space. We »

- Mel Valentin

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Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Trailer Looks Magic

28 June 2010 5:47 PM, PDT | Clothes on Film | See recent Clothes on Film news »

Love them or loathe them, every couple of years a new Harry Potter movie ambles along, its young cast gradually coming to resemble the most clean living group of teenagers ever to grace the screen. However all that fun is set to end with the release of final film in the series Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows in two parts (2010, 2011), and here, at last, is the trailer. Verdict? If you like Potter, you are going to like this. Cannot say fairer than that.

Just as directors of the now seven strong collection have been varied, so too have costume designers. Probably the most important, particularly in relation to giving the films a significant portion of their visual personality, was Judianna Makovsky. Also known for her work on both National Treasure pics, Makovsky is typically recognised for contemporary costume design. She combined this genre effortlessly with fantasy on Potter no. »

- Chris Laverty

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'Entourage' as a movie: A very good idea, and here's some advice for it

24 June 2010 1:09 PM, PDT | EW.com - The Movie Critics | See recent EW.com - The Movie Critics news »

If you scoured the globe, I’m not sure that you’d find a more avid fan of Entourage than yours truly. To me, it’s the rare series that’s highly praised and, in an odd way, underrated. (By now, of course, it’s also become fashionable to knock it.)  The praise, which usually comes thick and fast (just like the show), is for all the right reasons. So, on occasion, is the criticism (like the spitballs hurled at the fact that the entire last season was organized so that the fate of nations seemed to be hanging on »

- Owen Gleiberman

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EW's 100 Greatest Characters: Joss Whedon reveals his recipe for Buffy

31 May 2010 6:00 AM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

In celebration of Entertainment Weekly’s two decades of existence this year, we’ve put together a special double-sized issue devoted to the 100 greatest characters of the past 20 years. On our ranked list, you’ll find Anchorman’s Ron Burgundy, Lost’s John Locke, Harry Potter, Homer Simpson — all characters who feel as real and important to us as our own friends and family.

Also on that list? Buffy “the Vampire Slayer” Summers, of course. And we thought, who better to illustrate what is so special about the extraordinary young killer of evil things — played in the TV series by »

- EW staff

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HeyUGuys IMDb250 Project – Week 15

3 May 2010 5:53 AM, PDT | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The IMDb250. A list of the top 250 films, as ranked by the users of the biggest movie Internet site on the web. It is based upon the ratings provided by the users of The Internet Movie Database, which number into the millions. As such, it’s a perfect representation of the opinions of the movie masses, and arguably the most comprehensive ranking system on the Internet.

It’s because of this that we at HeyUGuys (and in this case, we, is myself and Gary) have decided to set ourselves a project. To watch and review all 250 movies on the list! We’ve frozen the list as of 1st January this year. It’s not as simple as it sounds, as we’ll be watching them in one year, 125 each.

This is our fifteenth update, a rundown of my next five movies watched for the project.

(You can find last week »

- Barry Steele

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Quick Snaps: Double-Theater Double Feature

19 April 2010 11:30 AM, PDT | Slackerwood | See recent Slackerwood news »

I realize you all are looking at the above photo and thinking, "Those double-features on the Paramount marquee are in no way unusual. Jette, did someone spike your oatmeal?" Hang on, and I'll tell you the whole story, with another photo to give you a hint after the jump.

It was August 2006. I loved the movie Ball of Fire and wanted to see it at the Paramount. I didn't feel a need to see His Girl Friday again, though. I was in a double-feature mood, but not for that double feature. I knew what I wanted to see instead. So I skipped the August 1 screening -- which it turned out Quentin Tarantino attended, as many people reported later -- and set my sights for the evening of Wednesday, August 2.

read more »

- Jette Kernion

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The Bounty Hunter

19 March 2010 8:11 AM, PDT | The Scorecard Review | See recent Scorecard Review news »

The Bounty Hunter

Directed by: Andy Tennant

Cast: Gerard Butler, Jennifer Aniston, Jason Sudeikis

Running Time: 1 hr 50 mins

Rating: PG-13

Release Date: March 19, 2010

Top 7 Bad Chemistry Couple Movies

Plot: A bounty hunter (Butler) struggles to keep his ex-wife (Aniston) under control when he is assigned to bring her in for skipping bail.

Who’S It For?: I am not going to advocate the disappointment, waste of money, and loss of time that is promoted by this miserable experience. Before becoming a tragic witness to this disaster’s laziness, I could only imagine the indifference the creators had when settling on the no-flare title “The Bounty Hunter.” It is astounding that they didn’t keep up with the hot trend of ruining Beatles songs and title this sucker “For No One.” Either way, fellow moviegoer – Aniston and Butler committed  the crime, and you shouldn’t do the time.

Expectations: Compared »

- Nick Allen

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Gentlemen Prefer Blondes | Film Review

27 February 2010 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Marilyn Monroe and Jane Russell star in this musical comedy which lacks the wit of the original novel

This 1953 musical comedy, among the last of its kind to be made before the coming of the widescreen, features a golddigging Monroe and a man-eating Russell as busty girls en route by sea from the States to Paris, France. There are a couple of well-staged numbers but less wit and style than are to be found in Anita Loos's demotic classic on which it's based. Released the year Playboy was launched, it features much characteristic 50s coarseness and leering. Gentleman Prefer Blondes is among the weaker works of a great filmmaker, whose two finest comedies (Bringing Up Baby, His Girl Friday) were made before the war and whose greatest film (Rio Bravo) was yet to come.

MusicalComedyRomanceMarilyn MonroePhilip French

guardian.co.uk © Guardian News & Media Limited 2010 | Use of this content is »

- Philip French

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Clip joint: doughnuts

4 February 2010 4:02 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

This week on Clip joint, put down your danish, throw away your pain au raisin and chow down on Joe Sommerlad's platter of the best doughnuts on film

In recent years, the doughnut has been edged out of the cinematic limelight. Perhaps it's to do with how strongly Homer Simpson is associated with the sugary buns. Perhaps it's a product of cop shows being a bigger staple on TV than on film. Perhaps it's even about increased health consciousness. But it's easy to forget just how pivotal a role this humble snack has played in great films over the years.

Scarfing down some deep-fried treats in a diner is one of the first things Bill Murray does when he realises he's doomed to repeat the same day over and over again in Groundhog Day. Jeff Goldblum's mutating mad scientist in The Fly eventually finds himself vomiting stomach acid on »

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Clip joint: journalists

27 January 2010 7:22 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Hold the front page and admire Rob Streeten's clippings file of the best film morsels featuring cool correspondents and deadline junkies, then suggest some column inches of your own

Reporters, whether they're of the fictional or based-on-real-life variety, not only make film terrific characters but also provide movies with a ready-made narrative driver. Following a newshound new to a story excuses otherwise awkward exposition as the audience learns with the protagonist.

We can love their integrity as it sweeps them towards the truth as much as we are exasperated by their bullheadedness as they pursue a story regardless of the consequences. In the movies, journalism has propelled the action as a corrupt administration is brought down, as well as provided cover for the identity of a superhero.

It is the cinematic device that can put familiar characters in unfamiliar environments and drive them to the heart of drama. The quick »

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The HeyUGuys IMDb250 Project

20 January 2010 10:00 PM, PST | HeyUGuys.co.uk | See recent HeyUGuys news »

The IMDb250. A list of the top 250 films, as ranked by the users of the biggest movie internet site on the web. The list has been much maligned, particularly recently. It is however based upon the ratings provided by the users of The Internet Movie Database, which number into the millions. As such, it’s a perfect representation of the opinions of the movie masses, and arguably the most comprehensive ranking system on the internet. If you have a real interest in film, chances are you’re a regular visitor to IMDb.com.

It’s because of this that we at HeyUGuys (and in this case, we, is myself and Gary) have decided to set ourselves a project. To watch and review all 250 movies on the list! We’ve frozen the list as of 1st January this year (See below), as it is always ever changing. It’s not as simple as it sounds, »

- Barry Steele

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YouTube movies: the diamonds among the debris

14 January 2010 2:43 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

You haven't seen Iranian Kidney Bargain Sale? Then you haven't dipped a toe into the motliest crew on record

The other day I finally got a chance to see Iranian Kidney Bargain Sale, a documentary I'd been meaning to get to for some time. Chronicling the adventures of assorted young Iranians who sell their kidneys to buy a taxi, or finance their ­education, or pay off debts, Iranian Kidney Bargain Sale is not the kind of movie that is readily available at most local video stores. But it is available – free – in the movie section at YouTube. So is a lot of other stuff.

Mostly when I visit YouTube it is to watch cats falling off chairs, parodies of Heath Ledger's turn as the Joker or sportscasters being tormented by stalking sock puppets. But it was recently pointed out to me that YouTube also has a section that is »

- Joe Queenan

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Why Quentin Tarantino wants to be the next Howard Hawks

12 January 2010 10:38 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

Last night Quentin Tarantino was the subject of an Alfred Dunhill Bafta Life in Pictures interview. Ben Child went along to hear the director confirm his love of on-screen violence, and discuss his hopes for a lasting cinematic legacy

Quentin Tarantino was in a fine mood last night. From the moment the film-maker leapt on stage, dapper yet scruffy in black and grey, flashing peace signs at the crowd and beaming ear-to-ear with that maniacal schoolboy grin, you knew he was in the mood to enjoy himself.

Over the course of the evening, he touched on all his films, from 1992's Reservoir Dogs through to last year's Inglourious Basterds. Here was a man who routinely suffers at the hands of the critics for what some see as glaring over-confidence: a man treating his job as one big joke. But if there was one thing that was thrown into focus last night, »

- Ben Child

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Why can't theatre and romcoms get it together? | Brian Logan

12 January 2010 9:45 AM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

From As You Like It to The Front Page, theatre was once captivated by romantic comedies. Did we get too cynical?

The other week I interviewed the playwright David Greig and the musician Gordon McIntyre about their lo-fi musical, Midsummer. The show (opening at Soho theatre this week) is being sold on the novelty of its indie soundtrack – but when I saw it in Edinburgh last year, it wasn't the music that stood out, it was the romance. Indie music in theatre isn't so uncommon. But romantic comedy? If there'd been popcorn for sale in the Traverse foyer, it could hardly have seemed more out-of-place.

So is theatre down on romcom? It wasn't always thus: consider As You Like It, A Midsummer Night's Dream et al, and Shakespeare starts to look (well, just a little) like the Nora Ephron of the Elizabethan age. Romcoms were popular, too, in the theatre »

- Brian Logan

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It's Complicated | Film review

9 January 2010 4:07 PM, PST | The Guardian - Film News | See recent The Guardian - Film News news »

In his classic work, Pursuits of Happiness, the Harvard philosopher and film critic Stanley Cavell identified a significant branch of the 1930s screwball comedy as "the Hollywood Comedy of Remarriage". He was discussing pictures like The Philadelphia Story and His Girl Friday that turn upon the imbroglio occasioned by a good-looking, well-heeled youngish couple discovering shortly after their divorce that they're still in love. The suave ex-husband was typically played by Cary Grant while Ralph Bellamy tended to be cast as the ex-wife's decent but dull fiance.

It was a way of getting around or sending up the Hays office production code, and the writer-director Nancy Meyers, a student of film comedy noted for her participation in the remakes of Father of the Bride and The Parent Trap, has retrieved the format for a much-changed society. Her slickly entertaining It's Complicated features a few deft changes. First, the characters are now in their 50s; second, »

- Philip French

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20 items from 2010


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