The Great Dictator
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10 items from 2016


Hitler’s Folly Movie Review

20 June 2016 8:49 PM, PDT | ShockYa | See recent ShockYa news »

Hitler’S Folly Bill Plympton Studios Reviewed by: Harvey Karten, Shockya Grade: C- Director:  Bill Plympton Written by: Bill Plympton Cast:  Nate Steinwachs, Dana Ashbrook, Michael Sullivan, Kristin Samuelson, Andreas Hykade, Morton Hall Millen, David Shakopi, Kevin Kolack, Edie Bales, Alfred Rosenblatt, Ari Taub, James Hancock Screened at:  Free Link, NYC, 6/3/16 Opens: June 1, 2016 Mel Brooks, who directed the film “The Producers”—which features the hilarious, boundary-shattering song “Springtime for Hitler”–can breathe a sigh of relief.  His reputation as the creator of what is arguably the best, most audacious laugh-fest about the 20th Century’s worst tyrant easily matching Charlie Chaplin’s 1940 “The Great Dictator,” stands without a real modern challenge.   [ Read More ]

The post Hitler’s Folly Movie Review appeared first on Shockya.com. »

- Harvey Karten

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Henry & Eleanor, Frank & Bram, and The Breakfast Club

18 May 2016 7:20 AM, PDT | FilmExperience | See recent FilmExperience news »

On this day in movie related history... 

1152 King Henry II marries Eleanor of Aquitaine. Their romance is later fictionalized in the ever popular play/movie The Lion in Winter which we've written about several times

1897 Frank Capra is born in Italy. He'll immigrate to the Us at five years old and become one of the most famous film directors of all time.  Across the ocean in London a public reading of Bram Stoker's new novel "Dracula, or, The Un-dead" is staged. Frank Capra never makes a movie influenced by Dracula but everyone else does.

Meredith Wilson writing music1902 There's trouble right here in River City Mason City when Meredith Wilson is born. He'll later write The Music Man but not before accruing Oscar nominations for film scoring (The Little Foxes, The Great Dictator)

1912 The first Indian film Shree Pundalik is released in Mumbai. Thousands upon thousands upon thousands of »

- NATHANIEL R

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Intvw: A Six Pack Of New England Film-making Master Minds, Pt.2

1 May 2016 3:21 PM, PDT | iconsoffright.com | See recent Icons of Fright news »

The “Boston Underground Film Festival” (http://bostonunderground.org) at the Brattle Theatre in Cambridge, Ma is a hub for early film festival favorites, diverse programming, film culture and community along with multiple blocks of diverse short filmmaking visions. Whether it’s the celebration of local filmmaking talent with the “Homegrown Horror” short film block curated by Chris Hallock or the short film block that looks at the dark, twisted and humorous side of horror with “Fugue & Riffs”. After BUFF18, we had the chance to talk with six of these filmmakers as well as past and present members of these short film blocks at Buff!

These New England filmmakers and their film projects includes Andrea Mark Wolanin (Cleaning House), Izzy Lee (Innsmouth – which played at BUFF18 before the feature “Antibirth”), Jim McDonough (Idiom Origins Vol. 1), Jarrett Blinkhorn (They’re Closing In), Corey Norman (Suffer the Little Children) and Alex Divincenzo (Trouser Snake).

 

How does the resources, »

- Jay Kay

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Watch: Restore your love in movies, here’s short film ‘100 Years/100 Shots’

22 April 2016 8:01 AM, PDT | Flickeringmyth | See recent Flickeringmyth news »

Filmmaker and self-pronounced cinephile Jacob T. Swinney has a new video essay called 100 Years/100 Shots. The title’s pretty self-explanatory. It’s about the history of Tequila in the 21st century.

Swinney has chosen his most memorable shot from each year in the last 100 and placed them next to each other in chronological sequence. Not only does it fascinatingly chart the evolution of the medium, it also reaffirms why we devote so much of our spare time to the movies. See beneath the video embed below for the full list (in order) used.

100 Years/100 Shots from Jacob T. Swinney on Vimeo.

Birth of a Nation

Intolerance

The Immigrant

A Dog’s Life

Broken Blossoms

The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari

The Kid

Nosferatu

Safety Last

Sherlock Junior

Battleship Potemkin

The General

Metropolis

The Passion of Joan of Arc

Un Chien Andalou

All Quiet on the Western Front

Frankenstein

Scarface

King Kong »

- Oli Davis

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The Top 25 Funniest Actors of All Time

16 April 2016 7:33 PM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

 Who are the funniest, wackiest, cleverest, wittiest comic actors in the history of film and television? Take a look at our list and see who we came up with.

 

The top 25 laugh-getters…

 

 #25…George Carlin: Probably the best stand-up comedian of all-time. He brilliantly satirized American culture, mixing his liberal social commentary with an often unapologetically coarse and dirty style of language. His penchant for obscenities was most evident in his trademark routine “Seven words you can never say on television”. No one was better at mocking the excesses of American culture than Carlin.

 #24…Robin Williams: He had a manic energy and great improvisational skills. His hyper, free-form style inspired many comedians to follow, such as Jim Carrey. He shot to fame in the TV series Mork & Mindy, before breaking away to very successful movie career, appearing in films like Good Morning Vietnam, The World According to Garp, Mrs. Doubtfire and Popeye. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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Schwarzenegger, Rapaport and More React to Sylvester Stallone's Oscar Snub

29 February 2016 11:38 AM, PST | MovieWeb | See recent MovieWeb news »

The Academy Awards are always full of surprises, either from the various bits by the host, or the awards themselves. One of the biggest surprises this year was when Golden Globe winner Sylvester Stallone, who was the heavy favorite to win Best Supporting Actor for Creed, lost to Bridge of Spies star Mark Rylance. After the shocking news was revealed, several of the icon's famous fans took to Twitter in reaction to the news, including the actor's longtime friend Arnold Schwarzenegger, Michael Rapaport and even Sylvester Stallone's brother, Frank Stallone.

Arnold Schwarzenegger sent out a brief video message through his Twitter feed last night, telling his friend, "Sly, just remember, no matter what they say, to me, you were the best. You were the winner. I'm proud of you." This heartwarming video has already been retweeted more than 27,000 times since the actor first sent it out last night, but »

- MovieWeb

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Top 10 Oscar Surprises

24 February 2016 11:21 AM, PST | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

Here are 10 Oscar moments that left us gobsmacked. Which winners, speeches, performances, fashions, and gaffes surprised you the most? Let us know in the comments below. 10. Charlie Chaplin Receives 12-Minute Standing Ovation (1972) It may not be surprising, exactly — after all, he earned it with "The Gold Rush," "City Lights," "Modern Times," and "The Great Dictator," among others — but the sheer length of the ovation Chaplin upon receiving an honorary Oscar in 1972 left the filmmaker himself nearly speechless. (Though he'd received a special award for "The Circus" in 1929, his remarkable career had, to that point, netted but three competitive nominations — two for "The Great Dictator" and one for "Monsieur Verdoux" — and no wins.) As perhaps the greatest of the silent cinema's actors and directors understood, there are times when "words seem so futile, so feeble," and this was surely one. 9. Roberto »

- Matt Brennan

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Charlie Chaplin Theme Park Aims for April Opening After Decade of Delays

17 February 2016 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Following years of delay, the Manoir de Ban, the Swiss home where Charlie Chaplin spent the last 25 years of his life, will finally open to the public in April, developers announced Monday, according to reports.Following extensive rebuilding and renovations, the stately home will act as the centerpiece of Chaplin's World, a theme park dedicated to "The Little Tramp." Set on an 18-acre property overlooking Lake Geneva in Corsier-sur-Vevey, the restored home will form half of the attraction. A separate Hollywood studio-tour-type structure tracing his life from Victorian London boyhood to Hollywood screen legend will treat visitors to films, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Charlie Chaplin Theme Park Aims for April Opening After Decade of Delays

17 February 2016 2:00 PM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

Following years of delay, the Manoir de Ban, the Swiss home where Charlie Chaplin spent the last 25 years of his life, will finally open to the public in April, developers announced Monday, according to reports.Following extensive rebuilding and renovations, the stately home will act as the centerpiece of Chaplin's World, a theme park dedicated to "The Little Tramp." Set on an 18-acre property overlooking Lake Geneva in Corsier-sur-Vevey, the restored home will form half of the attraction. A separate Hollywood studio-tour-type structure tracing his life from Victorian London boyhood to Hollywood screen legend will treat visitors to films, »

- Peter Mikelbank

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Kurosawa’s ‘Ran’ and Chaplin’s ‘The Great Dictator’ Get Restored In New Trailers

6 January 2016 11:18 AM, PST | The Film Stage | See recent The Film Stage news »

In-between our end-of-year recaps and beginning-of-year anticipatory lists, let’s take a moment to look at classics once again heading our way in 2016. (Depending on where you live, that is.) A restoration some will soon be able to revel in is the 4K scan of Akira Kurosawa‘s Ran, which, following its showing at the New York Film Festival, will come to the city’s own Film Forum on February 26. Although Studio Canal have had it in their Blu-ray collection since 2010, that release earned middling reactions; hopefully a new pass (particularly with the big screen in mind) has yielded finer results. [Blu-ray]

While the Kurosawa picture could stand a proper HD upgrade, Charlie Chaplin‘s The Great Dictator was treated well when Criterion produced a Blu-ray in 2011. Cineteca di Bologna (in partnership with Criterion) have nevertheless advertised a restoration, presumably one that will be coming to Italian theaters — and one that looks (expectedly) terrific, »

- Nick Newman

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2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2002

10 items from 2016


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