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The Ghost Breakers (1940) Poster

Goofs

Character error 

The elevator operator tells Larry that room 1409 is "down the hall and to the left" yet he gestures down the hall and to the right.
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Continuity 

When Raspy Kelly goes to Lawrence's apartment, the entire city is in a blackout due to the storm. He uses the doorbell and intercom, even though there's no power.
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During the blackout scene, Raspy and Larry are both holding cigarettes. The wind blows out a candle; simultaneously the lights come back on. At that moment, Larry's cigarette disappears.
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A ghost is seen walking in the foyer where Lawrence finds his body is entombed. Later, Lawrence "discovers" the same ghost's body in the crypt.
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When the man dies in the crypt, he dies with his eyes open. In the next shot his eyes are closed.
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When Geoff Montgomery knocks on the door to Mary Carter's hotel room, he's wearing his hat but when she opens the door he has it in his hand even though there hasn't been sufficient time after the cut take for him to have removed it.
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Crew or equipment visible 

The flashlight that Hope uses must not be battery powered. You can see him dragging a wire attached to one his shoes whenever he is using the flashlight and his feet are visible.
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Factual errors 

This film, like all the Tarzan ones and other 'exotic' locale-type films with lush foliage or 'jungle' scenes, makes significant use of the sound of the Kookaburra (bird), which is found only in the Southern Pacific area. The usage is intentional, for 'effect', and relies on the lack of education of most viewers.
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Revealing mistakes 

Obvious wires hold up the fluttering bats.
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See also

Trivia | Crazy Credits | Quotes | Alternate Versions | Connections | Soundtracks

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