IMDb > The Fighting 69th (1940)
The Fighting 69th
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The Fighting 69th (1940) More at IMDbPro »

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Overview

User Rating:
6.8/10   1,108 votes »
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Down 8% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Norman Reilly Raine (original screen play by) &
Fred Niblo Jr. (original screen play by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for The Fighting 69th on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
27 January 1940 (USA) See more »
Tagline:
Jammed With Action ! . . Loaded With Excitement ! . . . And Every Thrill-Packed Word Is True !
Plot:
Although loudmouthed braggart Jerry Plunkett alienates his comrades and officers, Father Duffy, the regimental chaplain, has faith that he'll prove himself in the end. Full summary » | Full synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
NewsDesk:
An Uneasy Peace: The Disappearing War Film
 (From SoundOnSight. 21 May 2011, 11:57 PM, PDT)

User Reviews:
A WW I movie made during WW II. It explains the patriotic elements in this movie. See more (21 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

James Cagney ... Jerry Plunkett

Pat O'Brien ... Father Duffy
George Brent ... 'Wild Bill' Donovan
Jeffrey Lynn ... Joyce Kilmer

Alan Hale ... Sgt. 'Big Mike' Wynn
Frank McHugh ... 'Crepe Hanger' Burke
Dennis Morgan ... Lieutenant Ames
Dick Foran ... Lt. 'Long John' Wynn
William Lundigan ... Timmy Wynn
Guinn 'Big Boy' Williams ... Paddy Dolan
Henry O'Neill ... The Colonel

John Litel ... Captain Mangan
Sammy Cohen ... Mike Murphy
Harvey Stephens ... Major Anderson

William Hopper ... Private Turner (as DeWolf Hopper)
Tom Dugan ... Private McManus

Frank Wilcox ... Lieutenant Norman
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Herbert Anderson ... Pvt. Casey (uncredited)
John Arledge ... Second Alabama Man (uncredited)
Trevor Bardette ... First Alabama Man (uncredited)
Jack Boyle Jr. ... Chuck (uncredited)
Richard Clayton ... Tierney (uncredited)
Frank Coghlan Jr. ... Jimmy (uncredited)
Tom Coleman ... Wounded Soldier in Parade Car (uncredited)
James Conaty ... Officer at Briefing (uncredited)
Joseph Crehan ... Doctor Giving Inoculations (uncredited)
John Daheim ... Soldier (uncredited)
Eddie Dew ... Regan (uncredited)
Ralph Dunn ... Medical Captain (uncredited)
Edgar Edwards ... Engineer Officer (uncredited)

Frank Faylen ... Engineer Sergeant at Cave-In (uncredited)
James Flavin ... Supply Sergeant (uncredited)
Jerry Fletcher ... Telephonist (uncredited)
Arno Frey ... German Officer (uncredited)
Edmund Glover ... Fourth Alabama Man (uncredited)
Chuck Hamilton ... Soldier Watching Fight (uncredited)
John Harron ... Carrol (uncredited)
J. Anthony Hughes ... Healey (uncredited)
Layne Ireland ... Hefferman (uncredited)
Donald Kerr ... New Recruit (uncredited)
George Kilgen ... Ryan (uncredited)
Jacques Lory ... Waiter (uncredited)
Wilfred Lucas ... Doctor Checking Eyes (uncredited)
Frank Mayo ... Capt. Bootz (uncredited)
Frank Melton ... Third Alabama Man (uncredited)
Elmo Murray ... O'Brien (uncredited)
Byron Nelson ... Soldier (uncredited)
George O'Hanlon ... Eddie Kearney (uncredited)
Jack Perrin ... Major (uncredited)

George Reeves ... Jack O'Keefe (uncredited)
John Ridgely ... Moran (uncredited)
Frank Sully ... Sergeant (uncredited)
Roland Varno ... German Officer (uncredited)
Emmett Vogan ... Doctor Giving Physicals (uncredited)
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Directed by
William Keighley 
 
Writing credits
Norman Reilly Raine (original screen play by) &
Fred Niblo Jr. (original screen play by) and
Dean Riesner (original screen play by)

Produced by
Louis F. Edelman .... associate producer
Hal B. Wallis .... executive producer
 
Original Music by
Adolph Deutsch (music by)
 
Cinematography by
Tony Gaudio (director of photography)
 
Film Editing by
Owen Marks (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
Ted Smith 
 
Makeup Department
Perc Westmore .... makeup artist
 
Production Management
Jack L. Warner .... in charge of production
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Frank Heath .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
Charles Lang .... sound
 
Special Effects by
Byron Haskin .... special effects
Rex Wimpy .... special effects
 
Stunts
Harvey Parry .... stunts (uncredited)
Buster Wiles .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Leo F. Forbstein .... musical director
Hugo Friedhofer .... orchestral arrangements
 
Other crew
John T. Prout .... technical advisor (as Capt. John T. Prout)
Mark White .... technical advisor
George Boothby .... technical advisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production Companies
  • Warner Bros. (presents) (as Warner Bros. Pictures Inc.) (A Warner Bros.-First National Picture)
Distributors
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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
90 min | Finland:84 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Sound System)
Certification:
Australia:PG | Australia:G (TV rating) | Finland:K-16 | Finland:K-15 (new rating: 2001) | Sweden:15 | USA:TV-PG | USA:Passed (National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (PCA #5756)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
In training camp, there is a reference to the 69th as 'Coxey's Army'. Coxey's Army was the name given to a protest march on Washington in 1894 by unemployed workers, led by businessman Jacob Coxey.See more »
Goofs:
Plot holes: Major Donovan says to Father Duffy " This isn't just another night hike...this is it". It seems to infer they are going into battle, but they were still in America.See more »
Quotes:
Father Duffy:You know Jerry, you're getting yourself so "well-liked" in this army, that they'd rather machine gun *you* than the *Germans*! It was *bad enough* at Camp Mills, but instead in *improving* you've been getting *worse*!
Jerry Plunkett:Aw, that's what *you* think!
Father Duffy:No, that's what *everybody* thinks!
See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Warner at War (2008) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
Silent Night, Holy NightSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
3 out of 6 people found the following review useful.
A WW I movie made during WW II. It explains the patriotic elements in this movie., 7 September 2006
Author: Boba_Fett1138 from Groningen, The Netherlands

This movie is just like most of the other movies from the '40's. It isn't too expensive or impressive looking but the movie serves its purpose.

Calling this movie a masterpiece would be an offense to other- true brilliant war movies. The movie remains way too simple and predictable for that. It doesn't make this movie as powerful as it perhaps could had been with a better story-flow and storytelling in general.

The movie its story is pretty simple and it mostly relies on themes such as comradeship and courage during a war situation. It provides the movie as a whole with a sort of patriotic undertone that however never really fully distracts from the movie. The movie still works well and at times also effective but it isn't all too impressive or memorable. Probably the only thing that makes this movie still a true recommendable and above average one, is the presence of James Cagney, in the main lead.

The rest of the acting is a bit bland and typically '40's over-the-top at certain points. Basically the James Cagney character is the only interesting one because of this but he honestly is not powerful or likable enough in his role, to carry the entire movie on his own.

It's sort of nice to see a movie focusing on WW I for a change. There really aren't that many WW I movies around, even though it was a really interesting time period with more than enough great and powerful stories to tell.

The movie is certainly not bad looking but it uses a bit too much stock-footage with as a result that the movie looks a bit cheap and perhaps even a bit silly. Further more the movie is also filled with a couple of odd and misplaced sequences (mostly patriotic and moralistic ones) that don't help to make this movie the easiest or most pleasant one to watch.

Good enough to watch it and effective at some points but for most part the movie remains nothing more than a distant and simple WW I movie.

6/10

http://bobafett1138.blogspot.com/

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Message Boards

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Music tarmcgator
Foreign language spoken during inoculation scene ? viaggio1
Which Arch of Triumph ? Chris398
Plunkett would have been discharged prior to deployment -real life rkolsen
Joyce Kilmer jastanga
White-Technical Advisor valleyblvd209
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