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The Earl of Chicago (1940)

Silky has always moved booze. In prohibition, he smuggled it from Canada, but now that it is legal, he produces his own brand. Seven years before, he sent Doc to prison because Doc was an ... See full summary »

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, (uncredited)

Writers:

(story), | 2 more credits »
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Director: Harry Beaumont
Stars: Robert Montgomery, Sally Eilers, Madge Evans
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
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Quentin 'Doc' Ramsey
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Gervase Gonwell
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Munsey, the Butler
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Mr. Redwood
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Maureen Kilmount
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Lord Chancellor
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Reading Clerk (as Ian Wulf)
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Judson
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Storyline

Silky has always moved booze. In prohibition, he smuggled it from Canada, but now that it is legal, he produces his own brand. Seven years before, he sent Doc to prison because Doc was an honest man. Now that he is getting out, Silky wants an honest man as his general manager. When an English solicitor arrives to show that Silky is the new Earl of Gorley, Doc sees his chance to get Silky out of the way. But Silky takes Doc with him to England to see about selling his holdings and taking the money. While Doc knows that none of the property can be sold, he does not tell Silky. While Silky is shown all his duties and responsibilities, Doc is busy bankrupting his business in Chicago. Written by Tony Fontana <tony.fontana@spacebbs.com>

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Genres:

Drama

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Release Date:

5 January 1940 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

O Conde de Chicago  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The practice of trying members of the British gentry before their peers was put to a stop in 1946, six years after this movie was made. See more »

Connections

Referenced in From the Ends of the Earth (1939) See more »

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User Reviews

 
If you thought it was a gangster drama, you're mistaken
13 February 2006 | by (Brooklyn) – See all my reviews

I've seen a lot of reviews of this film here claiming it's a gangster drama that would've worked better as a comedy. Did you miss the laughs? Some critics argue that Robert Montgomery was doing an unintentionally comedic gangster with Silky. I disagree. It's clearly satirical, with more depth added as the character becomes more exposed to another culture and from the decency shown to him by his new acquaintances. Sure, some parts could've been expanded on, and there could've been another half an hour of exposition. For me, many of the old studio pictures suffer from an assembly line mentality and are often dated or limited by today's standards. But I find satisfaction in the individual performances, scenes and the various technical and artistic contributions. Sadly, I feel there's a shortage of even those traits in today's Hollywood tripe.


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