5.8/10
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Confederate Honey (1940)

Nett Cutler (Elmer Fudd) romances Crimson O'Hairoil in this send-up of Gone With the Wind (1939).

Director:

(as I. Freleng)

Writer:

(story)
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Cast

Uncredited cast:
...
Various (voice) (uncredited)
...
Crimson O'Hairoil (voice) (uncredited)
Sara Berner ...
Various (voice) (uncredited)
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Colonel O'Hairoil / Lazy Slave (voice) (uncredited)
Arthur Q. Bryan ...
Ned Cutler (voice) (uncredited)
The Sportsmen Quartet ...
Vocalists (voice) (uncredited)
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Storyline

Nett Cutler (Elmer Fudd) romances Crimson O'Hairoil in this send-up of Gone With the Wind (1939).

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Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

30 March 1940 (USA)  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The first Friz Freleng cartoon upon his return to Warner Bros. after nearly 2 years working at MGM. See more »

Connections

Spoofs Uncle Tom's Cabin (1927) See more »

Soundtracks

Beautiful Dreamer
(1862) (uncredited)
Music by Stephen Foster
Played when Crimson is introduced and continued as her theme
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Frequently Asked Questions

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User Reviews

 
Does your tobacco taste different today?
18 September 2008 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

OK, so Friz Freleng's "Confederate Honey" contains stereotypical depictions of slaves. The people behind the cartoon didn't mean any hostility towards African-Americans; it was just that they didn't know any other images. This over-the-top parody of "Gone with the Wind" casts an early Elmer Fudd as opportunistic Red Cutler, trying to win the heart of southern belle Crimson O'Hairoil during the Civil War. Seeing the sort of gags that the cartoon contains, it surprises me that Tex Avery didn't direct it.

It's worth noting that this is the early incarnation of the cartoon world's most famous hunter. He evolved from a character named Egghead, whose appearance changed over the course of about two years. In 1940, they permanently turned him into Elmer Fudd (the name had first come up in "A Feud There Was", with Egghead as a peacemaker named that), but he still looked like Egghead. "A Wild Hare" introduced not only Elmer's recognizable form, but also Bugs Bunny's recognizable form.

Anyway, a really funny one.

PS: The scene with "The British are coming!" appears to have been lifted from Chuck Jones's "Old Glory".


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