A Chump at Oxford (1940) - News Poster

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Doctor Who: the film careers of William Hartnell & Jon Pertwee

  • Den of Geek
Feature Alex Westthorp 28 Mar 2014 - 07:00

In a new series, Alex talks us through the film roles of the actors who've played the Doctor. First up, William Hartnell and Jon Pertwee...

We know them best as the twelve very different incarnations of the Doctor. But all the actors who've been the star of Doctor Who, being such good all-rounders in the first place, have also had film careers. Admittedly, some CVs are more impressive than others, but this retrospective attempts to pick out some of the many worthwhile films which have starred, featured or seen a fleeting cameo by the actors who would become (or had been) the Doctor.

William Hartnell was, above all else, a film star. He is by far the most prolific film actor of the main twelve to play the Time Lord. With over 70 films to his name, summarising Hartnell's film career is difficult at best.
See full article at Den of Geek »

Peter Cushing: A centenary celebration

For the fans of this wonderful man, which I proudly count myself as one; 26 May 2013 marks the centenary of horror legend Peter Cushing. One of the most versatile actors to grace the big screen, Cushing never gave a single bad performance throughout his 50-year career. A dedicated perfectionist, who believed in giving nothing less than his best effort, Cushing’s 100% commitment always lifted a bad film. The movie may fail him but he would never fail his public.

Cushing began his acting career in repertory theatre and with his legendary one-way ticket to Hollywood, made his film debut in 1939. After a couple of productive years in the States, he worked his way back to England following the outbreak of World War 2. Marrying actress Helen Beck, he worked on stage but struggled to find good roles until he became a member of the RSC under Laurence Oliver. As British TV’s first big star,
See full article at Shadowlocked »

Peter Cushing: A Life In Film book review

  • Den of Geek
Review Aliya Whiteley 21 Mar 2013 - 06:02

To mark the centenary of his birth, Titan Books brings us Peter Cushing: A Life In Film. Here's Aliya's review of a great book...

Some actors become the focus of public sentiment. We love them, hate them, laugh at them – not as the characters they play, but in what we perceive to be their real life. Few actors continue to inspire such respect after their death as Peter Cushing, and the strength of this account of Cushing’s life and film roles is that it understands the admiration we feel for him, as an actor, and as a human.

Peter Cushing: A Life In Film is being published to coincide with the centenary of Cushing’s birth, and writer David Miller brings together a thorough and fascinating collection of anecdotes and memorabilia in this chronological journey that focuses on the progression of his career,
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New at Tfh: John Landis on A Chump At Oxford

John Landis takes on A Chump At Oxford.

Like Saps at Sea, this Hal Roach Laurel & Hardy vehicle was originally conceived as a four-reeler, but was bumped up to 63 minutes to compete in the feature market. These were arguably their last substantial feature releases before a contract with 20th Century Fox reduced them to formula B-pictures. It’s a cultural crime that today’s kids know nothing of Stan and Ollie, but that’s their loss. John McCabe’s 1961 biography “Mr. Laurel & Mr. Hardy” remains the definitive word on the duo.

Click here to watch the trailer.

Nothing much to add to this commentary today, folks. Instead, have a Laurel and Hardy short:

And, if you haven’t checked it out, this commentary and (I think) all the Landis-hosted commentaries this week were recorded in the session in which we captured the bloopers in the John Landis blooper reel.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Week 205: John Landis on Comedy.

A week of Landis bringing you 3 classic comedies starts now.

On Monday, August 1, join John Landis for the trailer to A Chump at Oxford.

Like Saps at Sea, this Hal Roach Laurel & Hardy vehicle was originally conceived as a four-reeler, but was bumped up to 63 minutes to compete in the feature market. These were arguably their last substantial theatrical releases before a contract with 20th Century Fox reduced them to formula B-pictures. It’s a cultural crime that today’s kids know nothing of Stan and Ollie, but that’s their loss. John McCabe’s 1961 biography “Mr. Laurel & Mr. Hardy” remains the definitive word on the duo.

On Wednesday, August 3, join John Landis for the trailer to Have Rocket Will Travel.

This cheap but popular sci fi spoof was the first Columbia feature for the Stooges, who had contemplated retirement until the galvanic response to the release of the Stooges
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

Happy Birthday, Stan Laurel!

The incomparable comic genius was born 121 years ago today. Let’s take a look, making sure we remember him now and in another 121 years.

It might not show between the cracks of all our appreciation for horror, exploitation, crime dramas, drama dramas, classic sci-fi and all the other bits of lost, obscure classics we throw at you on Trailers From Hell, but we’re pretty big comedy fans as well. Sure, you can find the occasional Jerry Lewis movie or a Peter Sellers picture or something by The Three Stooges, but you can’t — outside of John Landis talking about When Comedy Was King — find a lot of talk about the early days of film comedy.

And, specifically, we don’t have much about Stan Laurel — who was born on June 16, 121 years ago — and Oliver Hardy*. Which carries with it both a touch of irony and a hint of shame.
See full article at Trailers from Hell »

See also

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