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The Bank Dick (1940)

Not Rated | | Comedy | 29 November 1940 (USA)
Henpecked Egbert Sousè has comic adventures as a substitute film director and unlikely bank guard.

Director:

(as Edward Cline)

Writer:

(original screen play) (as Mahatma Kane Jeeves)
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On Disc

at Amazon

1 win. See more awards »
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
...
Agatha Sousé
...
Myrtle Sousé
Evelyn Del Rio ...
Elsie Mae Adele Brunch Sousé
...
Mrs. Hermisillo Brunch
...
J. Pinkerton Snoopington
...
Joe Guelpe
...
Mackley Q. Greene (as Richard Purcell)
...
Og Oggilby
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J. Frothingham Waterbury
...
Mr. Skinner
...
Filthy McNasty
George Moran ...
Cozy Cochran
Bill Wolfe ...
...
A. Pismo Clam
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Storyline

Egbert Sousé leads an ordinary life but is about to have an extraordinary day. Henpecked at home home by his demanding wife Agatha and more or less ignored by his daughter Myrtle, he sets off for the day. He comes across a movie shoot whose drunken director hasn't shown up for work and Egbert, saying he has experience, is hired. Afterward, he gets credit for stopping bank robbers and is rewarded with a job as the bank guard. He seems headed for trouble however when he convinces his son-in-law Og, a teller at the same bank, to use $500 for can't lose investment. The investment is a scam however and when the bank examiner arrives, it looks bad for them. As you would expect however, it all turns out well in the end. Written by garykmcd

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Was His Face Red . . . And His Nose, Too ! when the bandits took the money . . . and the SAFE !

Genres:

Comedy

Certificate:

Not Rated | See all certifications »
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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

29 November 1940 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Great Man  »

Filming Locations:

 »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The bar Shemp Howard's character runs was originally called "The Black Pussy Cafe," but the Production Code Administration said the name couldn't be used. W.C. Fields protested because he'd got the name from his friend, British comedian Leon Errol, who owned a real bar in L.A. called the Black Pussy Cafe. Fields said that if the California Alcoholic Beverages Control Board didn't object to that as the name of a real bar, the Production Code Administration shouldn't mind it as the name of a fictional one. The Code authority was unmoved, so the signs on the bar in the film call it "Black Pussy Cat Cafe"--but both Fields and another actor refer to it as the "Black Pussy Cafe" in the dialogue. See more »

Goofs

In the opening bit of dialogue, one of the old ladies points out that there is an "accent grave" over the final e in a character's name, meaning it would be pronounced "Sous-AY", not "Souse". In fact, it's an accent aigu (or acute accent), in both pronunciation and painted on the mailbox she's looking at. See more »

Quotes

Myrtle Sousé: [doing a crossword puzzle] What's a six-letter word meaning "embezzlement"?
Mrs. Hermisillo Brunch: Prison.
See more »

Connections

Referenced in Never Give a Sucker an Even Break (1941) See more »

Soundtracks

Home Sweet Home
(1823) (uncredited)
Music by H.R. Bishop
Background music near the beginning of the movie and at the end
See more »

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User Reviews

 
Classic Fields!
18 May 1999 | by (Denver, CO) – See all my reviews

'The Bank Dick' is a wonderful piece of comedy from W.C. Fields. He plays the town loser, who is given a job as a bank security guard when it appears that he helped stop a bank robbery. Fields' scenes with Franklin Pangborn as the bank examiner are the highlight of the film. The climactic chase sequence, with Fields mentioning points of interest as he is chased by the police, is also hilarious. Only a sequence early in the film, in which Fields pretends to be a Hollywood film director, fails to delight. Overall, a comedy classic!


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