Porky Pig goes on a safari in Africa, and runs into an assortment of crazy animals, wacky natives and Kay Kyser giving dance lessons in the middle of the jungle.

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Cast

Uncredited cast:
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Porky Pig / Dr. Stanley / Elephant (voice) (uncredited)
Robert C. Bruce ...
Narrator (voice) (uncredited)
Bill Days ...
Gorilla Singer (voice) (uncredited)
Kay Kyser ...
Cake Icer (voice) (uncredited)
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Porky Pig goes on a safari in Africa, and runs into an assortment of crazy animals, wacky natives and Kay Kyser giving dance lessons in the middle of the jungle.

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Release Date:

27 January 1940 (USA)  »

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(uncut)

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Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Connections

Spoofs Africa Speaks! (1930) See more »

Soundtracks

We're Working Our Way Through College
Music by Richard A. Whiting
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User Reviews

 
ostriches don't really stick their heads in the ground, and Africa doesn't have kangaroos, but it's got some neat gags
4 August 2008 | by (Portland, Oregon, USA) – See all my reviews

Obviously, Bob Clampett's "Africa Squeaks" has some of the most racist images of African people. But, as was usually the case in Warner Bros. cartoons containing racist depictions of Africans and African-Americans, the portrayals were not based on hostility; rather, the people making the cartoons had seen only these images of African people, and repeated them. For example, Clampett's "Coal Black and de Sebben Dwarfs" contains some of the most offensive depictions of African-Americans, while simultaneously exalting their contributions to popular culture.

Anyway, this cartoon has Porky Pig on vacation in Africa - which they obnoxiously call "the dark continent" - and coming across a series of spot gags. His stereotypically-drawn porters are basically Stepin Fetchit types. Like I said, the cartoon's good for a few laughs, just as long as we understand the racist portrayals.

BTW, Cake Icer was a parody of band leader Kay Kyser. Also, one scene was lifted out of "The Isle of Pingo Pongo", and another scene later got used in "Crazy Cruise".


3 of 6 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

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Need this cartoon for my colection. $$$$$ chevyjim
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