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Wuthering Heights
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Wuthering Heights (1939) More at IMDbPro »

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Wuthering Heights -- The story of unfortunate lovers Heathcliff and Cathy who, despite a deep affection for one another, are forced by circumstance and prejudice to live their apart...

Overview

User Rating:
7.8/10   11,256 votes »
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Down 42% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Charles MacArthur (screen play) and
Ben Hecht (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Wuthering Heights on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
7 April 1939 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
A Story of Vengeful Thwarted Love See more »
Plot:
A servant in the house of Wuthering Heights tells a traveler the unfortunate tale of lovers Cathy and Heathcliff. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Awards:
Won Oscar. Another 3 wins & 7 nominations See more »
User Reviews:
"I cannot live without my life! I cannot die without my soul." See more (109 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Merle Oberon ... Cathy

Laurence Olivier ... Heathcliff

David Niven ... Edgar
Flora Robson ... Ellen

Donald Crisp ... Dr. Kenneth

Geraldine Fitzgerald ... Isabella
Hugh Williams ... Hindley

Leo G. Carroll ... Joseph

Miles Mander ... Lockwood

Cecil Kellaway ... Earnshaw
Cecil Humphreys ... Judge Linton
Sarita Wooton ... Cathy (as a child) (as Sarita Wooten)
Rex Downing ... Heathcliff (as a child)
Douglas Scott ... Hindley (as a child)
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Frank Benson ... Heathcliff Servant (uncredited)
Romaine Callender ... Robert (uncredited)
Richard Clucas ... Little Boy (uncredited)
Vernon Downing ... Giles (uncredited)
Alice Ehlers ... Madame Ehlers (uncredited)
Harold Entwistle ... Beadle (uncredited)

Peter Gowland ... Dancer (uncredited)
Helena Grant ... Miss Hudkins (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... Party Guest / Wedding Guest (uncredited)
Susanne Leach ... Guest (uncredited)
Tommy Martin ... Little Boy (uncredited)
Edmund Mortimer ... Party Guest (uncredited)
Schuyler Standish ... Little Boy (uncredited)
William Stelling ... Dancer (uncredited)
Diane Williams ... Little Girl (uncredited)
Eric Wilton ... Linton Servant (uncredited)
Philip Winter ... Cathy's Partner (uncredited)

Directed by
William Wyler 
 
Writing credits
Charles MacArthur (screen play) and
Ben Hecht (screen play)

Emily Brontë (from the novel by)

John Huston  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
Samuel Goldwyn .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman (music)
 
Cinematography by
Gregg Toland (photography)
 
Film Editing by
Daniel Mandell (film editor)
 
Art Direction by
James Basevi 
Alexander Toluboff (uncredited)
 
Set Decoration by
Julia Heron (uncredited)
 
Costume Design by
Omar Kiam (costumes)
 
Makeup Department
Robert Stephanoff .... make-up artist (as Blagoe Stephanoff)
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Walter Mayo .... assistant director
 
Sound Department
Paul Neal .... sound recorder
 
Visual Effects by
W. Percy Day .... matte painter (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Jewel Jordan .... stunt double: Merle Oberon (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Russell Bennett .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Alfred Newman .... conductor (uncredited)
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
Samuel Goldwyn .... presenter
Jack Crosby .... dances (uncredited)
Lynn Farnol .... general press representative (uncredited)
Gus Schroeder .... location manager (uncredited)
Peter Shaw .... technical advisor (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


Production CompaniesDistributorsOther Companies

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
104 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Australia:PG | Finland:K-12 (1955) | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1947) | UK:U | USA:TV-PG (TV rating) | USA:Passed (The National Board of Review) | USA:Approved (certificate #5104) | West Germany:12

Did You Know?

Trivia:
'David Niven' dreaded the film not only because he was playing a thankless, secondary role, but because he dreaded working with William Wyler again. Merle Oberon was uncomfortable working with Niven after their year long love affair ended in 1936.See more »
Goofs:
Continuity: Near the end of the deathbed scene, Cathy has her arms around Heathcliff's neck, and takes them away. When the camera angle changes, her arms are around his neck again.See more »
Quotes:
Heathcliff:Catherine Earnshaw, may you not rest so long as I live on! I killed you. Haunt me, then! Haunt your murderer! I know that ghosts have wandered on the Earth. Be with me always. Take any form, drive me mad, only do not leave me in this dark alone where I cannot find you. I cannot live without my life! I cannot die without my soul.See more »
Movie Connections:
Soundtrack:
Piano Sonata in A major, K.331: Rondo alla TurcaSee more »

FAQ

How does the movie end?
How much sex, violence, and profanity are in this movie?
How closely does the movie follow the book?
See more »
81 out of 87 people found the following review useful.
"I cannot live without my life! I cannot die without my soul.", 16 July 2003
Author: Ashley (classicfilmbroad@aol.com) from North Carolina

Being a classic film buff, I had the chance of being introduced to this film by chance one late evening when it was being aired on TCM. I fell in love with the movie, and when I was told that it would be required reading over the summer, I was ridiculously happy. As many have noted, the 1939 adaptation of "Wuthering Heights" is, more or less, merely the first volume of Emily Bronte's beautifully and powerfully written classic -- focusing less on the detail of Heathcliff's wrath post Cathy's death, but moreso on the sheer complexity of Heathcliff and Cathy's relationship (the scenes at Penniston Crag of them among the moors and heather are not in the book because Bronte had to stick to Ellen's point of view -- it was nice that we could finally have an in-depth look at the tumultuous relationship between Cathy and Heathcliff). While characters are omitted (Frances, Hareton, Linton and the baby Catherine), it still retains much of the very nature of the novel. (If you will recall, many parts of "Gone With The Wind" were changed and characters removed in the process of transferring Margaret Mitchell's masterpiece into a screen epic. After all, this is Hollywood.)

The cinematography is divine (very much worth its Oscar), perfectly capturing the very essence of the bleak, chilling, haunting Yorkshire Moors that Bronte described in her book. Laurence Olivier is, in my opinion, a very fine Heathcliff. Indeed, in the book his nature is more animalistic and devilish, but Olivier superbly exhibits what Heathcliff is all about -- dark, brooding, and terribly bitter. Even at our first introduction to him, we know by the tone of his voice that something is very, very wrong with this man and that something is very, very off in that household. Olivier expresses Heathcliff's wildness and devilishness through his voice, stance and through his facial gestures, rather than so much in other physical ways. Merle Oberon is remarkable as Cathy -- a much more dark and exoctic beauty than Isabella whose good looks are very wholesome and pure (perhaps to match the darkness of the gypsy stable-boy Heathcliff), and capturing the duality of personality that is Catherine Earnshaw -- part of her wanting to love a wild, evil, wicked stable boy... the other part longing to be part of a higher society. Particularly coming to mind is her scene in the kitchen with Ellen and that marvelously disturbing death scene -- her eyes wild. (I do wish they would have left in the part of the book where she refuses to eat and begins hallucinating -- Oberon could have performed it so well.) Also to be noted are the stunning performances of David Niven and Gerladine Fitzgerald as the long-suffering Edgar and Isabella Linton (respectively), their lives made miserable by Cathy's selfishness, vanity and greed to be part of a higher way of living, and by Heathcliff's undying love for Catherine and his course of revenge and destruction. Flora Robson is also wonderful as Ellen Dean, narrator of the whole sordid story.

Someone mentioned that this film (by focusing on the love story and by the ending, I suppose) tried to say that Heathcliff and Catherine were perfect for each other and could have, eventually, found true love. I disagree, wholeheartedly. I believe what director William Wyler was trying to say here was that Heathcliff and Catherine were not good people. Cathy was right when she said that she and Heathcliff's souls were made of the same basic fiber -- they were both greedy and selfish (he wanted her passion for him to be as deep as his passion for her and she wanted and if he couldn't have it, no one else deserved to have it, and God forbid those around him feel any kind of love, compassion or humanity; and she didn't even really know what she wanted, except to be part of the upper crust and to rise above what she had lived through when Hindley became master of their house) and because of that, their love could have never meant anything BUT tragedy. They could never have found happiness together because they were not happy people. But they could find love in death -- because in death, they could be what they really were all along -- children; mere children forced to grow up all too quickly with the death of the man who cared deeply for them, thus forcing Hindley to become head of the household. There would be no Hindley in death. And as children they were good together -- as children, Cathy, wicked as she was at times as a youngster, could restore hopes of prosperity to Heathcliff's dark, bitter soul. They were, as children, more or less all one another had. And so they could go on, as children, without a care, happily picking heather and being King and Queen on the moors.

You've GOT to see this movie.

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Was the house supernatural? Lodja
This movie and story is laughable petelato
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