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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008 | 2007 | 2006 | 2005 | 2004 | 2003 | 2002 | 2000

1-20 of 319 items from 2014   « Prev | Next »


Celebrate 25 Years of The Little Mermaid with 25 Things Even Superfans May Not Know

14 November 2014 8:45 AM, PST | PEOPLE.com | See recent PEOPLE.com news »

The Little Mermaid, the movie that launched Disney's animated renaissance, premiered 25 years ago this Nov. 15. That might seem hard to believe for those of us who caught it in theaters, but we've had a quarter-century of snarfblats and dinglehoppers since then. In honor of the film's silver anniversary, we're presenting a list of things that you might not know about The Little Mermaid, even if you were one of those kids who wore out your VHS copy. 1. It wasn't expected to be a hit It's been alleged that Jeffrey Katzenberg, Disney's CEO at the time, thought that The Little Mermaid »

- Drew Mackie, @drewgmackie

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Berlinale to celebrate Technicolor centenary

12 November 2014 9:43 PM, PST | DearCinema.com | See recent DearCinema.com news »

Cyd Charisse and Gene Kelly in Singinʼ in the Rain (USA 1952) by Gene Kelly and Stanley Donen

Copyright: George Eastman House, Rochester, © 2014 Warner Bros Ent. All Rights Reserved.

The Retrospective of the 65th Berlin International Film Festival will celebrate the centenary of Technicolor. The Retrospective will present around 30 magnificent Technicolor films, some of which have been elaborately restored. They were made in the early years between the dawn of Technicolor and 1953 – and include six British films.

“The blazing red of Southern skies in Gone with the Wind or the ecstatic yellow of the raincoats in Singin’ in the Rain – in those days, the play of dramatically intensified colours was a sensation. The Technicolor process combined with cultural and economic trends to produce great cinematic works of art that still thrill audiences today,” says Berlinale Director Dieter Kosslick.

As of 1915, inventors Herbert T. Kalmus, Daniel Comstock and W. Burton Wescott developed the two-colour process Technicolor No. »

- NewsDesk

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Exclusive: Scott Snyder talks the horrors of Wytches

12 November 2014 12:11 PM, PST | FamousMonsters of Filmland | See recent Famous Monsters of Filmland news »

The last time you were scared of a witch was probably when you first saw Margaret Hamilton cackle her way through The Wizard Of Oz, or when Roald Dahl’s The Witches pulled off their wigs and gloves and exposed their claws (mommy!). Well, look no further, my friend: the first issue of Scott Snyder and Jock’s Wytches is pretty damn terrifying; and the second, hitting shops this week, brings in new characters, fills in backstory, and really raises the stakes while creating a collective of characters that is very difficult not to sympathize with. This is emotional horror at its finest, which is sometimes difficult to find at your local multiplex. Writer extraordinaire Scott Snyder was gracious enough to speak with FM about his personal fears, favorite recent horror flicks, and the fine art of being gross. Warning: this interview contains minor spoilers.

Famous Monsters. It seems to me, »

- Holly Interlandi

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Berlinale Retrospective to celebrate Technicolor

12 November 2014 4:32 AM, PST | ScreenDaily | See recent ScreenDaily news »

Retrospective strand to celebrate 100th anniversary of Technicolor.

The Retrospective of the 65th Berlin International Film Festival (Feb 5-15) is to celebrate the 100th anniversary of Color by Technicolor.

The strand will include around 30 Technicolor films, some of which have been restored, which were madebetween the dawn of Technicolor and 1953 – and include six British films.

Berlinale director Dieter Kosslick said: “The blazing red of Southern skies in Gone with the Wind or the ecstatic yellow of the raincoats in Singin’ in the Rain – in those days, the play of dramatically intensified colours was a sensation. The Technicolor process combined with cultural and economic trends to produce great cinematic works of art that still thrill audiences today.”

As well as those mentioned by Kosslick, titles to be screened include Richard Boleslawski’s drama The Garden of Allah (1936), George Sidney’s adventure film The Three Musketeers (1948) and Victor Fleming’s hit musical The Wizard of Oz (1939).

Other features will include »

- michael.rosser@screendaily.com (Michael Rosser)

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Berlin Festival to Pay Tribute to Technicolor in Retrospective

12 November 2014 4:10 AM, PST | The Hollywood Reporter | See recent The Hollywood Reporter news »

The Berlin International Film Festival will mark the 100th anniversary of color cinematography with a retrospective to the glory days of Technicolor. The 65th Berlinale will screen around 30 Technicolor classics including Gone With The Wind, Singin' in the Rain and The Wizard of Oz. Read More Hollywood's 100 Favorite Films Of All Time The retrospective will cover the period from the dawn of Technicolor in 1915, when inventors Herbert T. Kalmus, Daniel Comstock and W. Burton Wescott first developed the two-color process that revolutionized movie making, through to 1953, when the introduction of color negative film marked the

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- Scott Roxborough

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Wizards Vs Aliens series 3 episodes 5 & 6 review: Daughters Of Stone

11 November 2014 6:55 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Wizards Vs Aliens delivers a confident, surprising double-bill this week, one that proves it can well withstand recent cast changes...

This review contains spoilers.

3.5 & 3.6 Daughters Of Stone

It’s never easy to follow the departure of a major character, and with Benny having left in the previous episode Daughters Of Stone knows it has some big shoes to fill from the outset. So it’s perhaps not that surprising when Tom’s sometime-girlfriend Katie asks him to come and help out with an apparent haunting at the theatre looked after by her grandad. It’s even less surprising when, exactly ten minutes in, she witnesses Tom performing magic for the first time and the veil drops from her eyes.

As a character to replace Benny, Katie makes complete sense. Manpreet Bambra hasn’t always had a lot to work with on the show, but over three years she’s established »

- louisamellor

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The Wizard Of Oz at Tenacious Eats ‘Movies for Foodies’ November 15th

10 November 2014 9:24 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

“You, my friend, are a victim of disorganized thinking. You are under the unfortunate impression that just because you run away you have no courage; you’re confusing courage with wisdom.”

Movies for Foodies, a regular film series put on by Chef Liz Schuster, Chef Steve Schmidt, and the other talented chefs at Tenacious Eats, is back in a new location and a fresh slate of films to write menus around. Enjoy a five-course gourmet meal (and five unique cocktails) while enjoying one of your favorite movies! That’s the Tenacious Eats way! The movie starts at 8pm. The doors open at 6:00 for the pre-show which includes an hour of Super-8 Movie Madness and the live musical stylings of Sarah Jane and the Blue Notes!

Ticket information can be found at the Tenacious Eats site Here

http://tenaciouseats.com/

The next big  ‘Movie for Foodies’ is November 15th and for this Saturday’s event, »

- Tom Stockman

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Actress Martha Stewart May Still Be Alive Despite Two-Year-Old Reports to the Contrary

10 November 2014 7:05 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Martha Stewart: Actress / Singer in Fox movies apparently not dead despite two-year-old reports to the contrary (Photo: Martha Stewart and Perry Como in 'Doll Face') According to various online reports, including Variety's, actress and singer Martha Stewart, a pretty blonde featured in supporting roles in a handful of 20th Century Fox movies of the '40s, died at age 89 of "natural causes" in Northeast Harbor, Maine, on February 25, 2012. Needless to say, that was not the same Martha Stewart hawking "delicious foods" and whatever else on American television. But quite possibly, the Martha Stewart who died in February 2012 — if any — was not the Martha Stewart of old Fox movies either. And that's why I'm republishing this (former) obit, originally posted on March 11, 2012. Earlier today, a commenter wrote to Alt Film Guide, claiming that the Martha Stewart featured in Doll Face, I Wonder Who's Kissing Her Now, and In a Lonely Place »

- Andre Soares

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Drive, and exploring alternative movie soundtracks

10 November 2014 3:46 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

A rescoring of Drive has caused online outrage, but Mark's keeping an open mind about musical reinterpretations

Movie music matters. It's tough to wax lyrical about why it matters without sounding like one of those autocue scripts that we'll be hearing all throughout the coming awards season, probably read out by unlikely pairs of presenters, (“Now, to present the award for Best Sound Editing, Justin Bieber and Angela Lansbury!”) so let's just say that it does.

Whether it's an original score from Hans Zimmer or a jukebox tour of Quentin Tarantino's record collection, a movie's soundtrack informs the tone and timbre of the movie itself. So when we get into the question of movie rescores, we're really getting back into that thorny issue of asking whether the director's original intentions are sacrosanct to any subsequent versions of a film. As some of you may already have guessed, we bring »

- sarahd

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The 'Sisters' reunite. Next step? Let's get this show on Netflix!

7 November 2014 10:30 AM, PST | EW - Inside TV | See recent EW.com - Inside TV news »

Seven years before the world met Carrie, Charlotte, Miranda, and Samantha, there were four other women talking frankly about sex and relationships each week on TV. Sisters, which ran on NBC from 1991 to '96, chronicled the lives of the Reeds: Alex (Swoosie Kurtz), Teddy (Sela Ward), Georgie (Patricia Kalember), and Frankie (Julianne Phillips). Though the show has never been released on DVD or streaming, it has a devoted cult of fans with warm memories of the siblings who fought hard—Teddy once spray-painted "slut" on Frankie's car—but always had each other's backs. Sisters was mired in controversy even before it aired. »

- Sara Vilkomerson

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PopWatch Confessional: The embarrassing song that made you cry

7 November 2014 10:05 AM, PST | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Sunday marks the return of HBO's The Newsroom, a series that isn't exactly known for being subtle—especially in its first season, which featured a memorable scene set to Coldplay's "Fix You." Anvilicious? Oh yeah. Emotionally manipulative? You betcha. Surprisingly effective all the same? Unfortunately, yes, according to EW.com's Lanford Beard. Which is how we came upon this week's PopWatch Confessional question: What's the song that's had a surprising, embarrassing emotional effect on you? Lanford Beard, staff editor: Between all its walk-and-talks, Network rip-offs, and "women be klutzy" gags, The Newsroom's first season actually took on a few actual news events, »

- EW staff

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Critical Mass: 'Interstellar' aims for the stars

7 November 2014 8:59 AM, PST | EW - Inside Movies | See recent EW.com - Inside Movies news »

Interstellar features Matthew McConaughey, Anne Hathaway, Jessica Chastain, and Michael Caine, but it's the rare Hollywood film where the director is the unquestioned star. This is a Christopher Nolan joint, from its epic scope, its tangled storytelling gymnastics, and its unrivaled insistence on Nsa-level control and pre-release secrecy. The director, who made his name with the backwards-running Memento, and burnished his reputation with the Dark Knight trilogy and the mind-bending Inception, goes all in with Interstellar, an ambitious tribute to the film that most inspired him: Stanley Kubrick's 2001: A Space Odyssey. In the near future, Earth is slowly starving and suffocating, »

- Jeff Labrecque

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Citizenfour Review

5 November 2014 9:51 AM, PST | We Got This Covered | See recent We Got This Covered news »

“This will not be a waste of your time,” wrote an anonymous man in an encrypted email to documentary filmmaker Laura Poitras. The person sending her the message had liked her prior documentaries, My Country, My Country and The Oath, about the state of post-9/11 American life, and could trust that Poitras would keep his messages confidential and not reveal them to the authorities – especially since the director had been placed on a watch list as a result of her earlier, critical films. The person sending her messages also turns out to be a soft-spoken twenty-something from a North Carolina military family named Edward Snowden. Although he prefers it if you call him Ed.

Snowden signed these emails Citizenfour, which is also the title of Poitras’s new documentary. Many years from now, Americans curious enough to peer back to this era of paranoia will be thrilled to have a film like Citizenfour available, »

- Jordan Adler

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Watch: 45-Minute Documentary on Director Robert Wise

5 November 2014 8:54 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

People latch on to certain filmmakers and hold them up to an incredibly high standard. Martin Scorsese, Stanley Kubrick, Alfred Hitchcock and many others are given the pedestal treatment. However, there are so many directors out there who never get their due diligence. For example, who talks about how great Victor Fleming isc Not many people, despite directing Gone with the Wind and The Wizard of Oz... in the same year. One such filmmaker who I think has made some pretty fantastic films but is often overlooked in the film community is Robert Wise, who is the subject of a forty-five minute documentary you can watch below. The man started off as an editor, editing films like Citizen Kane and The Hunchback of Notre Dame. Moving into the director's chair, he made films like The Day the Earth Stood Still, West Side Story, The Sound of Music, Star Trek: The Motion Picture, »

- Mike Shutt

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The movie characters who scared us as children

5 November 2014 3:42 AM, PST | Den of Geek | See recent Den of Geek news »

Jaws from James Bond

One movie character who scared me as a child was Jaws, the shiny-toothed James Bond villain. Those silver teeth freaked me out, big time – I remember the early sequence from The Spy Who Loved Me was particularly chilling: Jaws lures a defenceless older man into a trap, and proceeds to bite into his neck, killing him. While we're shown no violence, the whole scene terrified me: the way Jaws walked slowly towards the man in a knowing, menacing way, and the idea of him simply biting the man to death (though at least he had the courtesy to stun the victim first).

Being bitten by Jaws isn't like being bitten by a vampire – he drinks no blood. Instead, he just seems to sink those artificial teeth into flesh and tear a hole big enough to cause fatal bleeding. Whenever I'd watch that scene, it made me deeply uncomfortable, »

- sarahd

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'Interstellar' (2014) Movie Review

4 November 2014 11:56 AM, PST | Rope of Silicon | See recent Rope Of Silicon news »

Interstellar is big. It's ambitious and it's personal. Director and co-writer Christopher Nolan (Inception, The Dark Knight) has taken a film centered on a world-saving space expedition to another galaxy, and turned it into a story of humanity and a father's love for his children (though, mostly just his daughter). Thinking back on all that happened in the span of the film's exhaustive 169-minute running time many highs come to mind -- epic highs as the universe bends, giant waves fill the screen and frozen clouds contribute to an icy, alien landscape. But for as epic as these highs may feel, the film doesn't necessarily offer the same returns once the final scene fades to black. The survival of the human race is at stake in Interstellar and I can't say I ever really felt that as much as I was marveling at moments in the narrative that seemed to »

- Brad Brevet

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Two Movies Starring (Inventor) Lamarr Coming Up on TCM

2 November 2014 3:47 PM, PST | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Hedy Lamarr: 'Invention' and inventor on Turner Classic Movies (photo: Hedy Lamarr publicity shot ca. early '40s) Two Hedy Lamarr movies released during her heyday in the early '40s — Victor Fleming's Tortilla Flat (1942), co-starring Spencer Tracy and John Garfield, and King Vidor's H.M. Pulham, Esq. (1941), co-starring Robert Young and Ruth Hussey — will be broadcast on Turner Classic Movies on Wednesday, November 12, 2014, at 7 p.m. and 9 p.m. Pt, respectively. Best known as a glamorous Hollywood star (Ziegfeld Girl, White Cargo, Samson and Delilah), the Viennese-born Lamarr (née Hedwig Eva Maria Kiesler), who would have turned 100 on November 9, was also an inventor: she co-developed and patented with composer George Antheil the concept of frequency hopping, currently known as spread-spectrum communications (or "spread-spectrum broadcasting"), which ultimately led to the evolution of wireless technology. (More on the George Antheil and Hedy Lamarr invention further below.) Somewhat ironically, »

- Andre Soares

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Trick-or-Treating at the White House Is a Totally Different Ball Game

2 November 2014 10:33 AM, PST | Popsugar.com | See recent Popsugar news »

There are Halloween decorations, and then there are the White House's Halloween decorations, which this year included 200 pumpkins, acrobats, and special costumes. On Friday, children from military families and kids from around the Washington DC area headed to the White House for a special Halloween event on the South Lawn. While President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama passed out candy to trick-or-treaters, performers juggled, danced, and showed off their impressive costumes, including an awesome take on Glinda the Good Witch from The Wizard of Oz. Take a look at some of the cutest pictures from the event, and then see more of Obama's most adorable moments with kids. »

- Laura-Marie-Meyers

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As per usual, Neil Patrick Harris' family dominated Halloween

1 November 2014 6:34 PM, PDT | EW.com - PopWatch | See recent EW.com - PopWatch news »

Happy Halloween from Gotham City!! pic.twitter.com/3gzmG44iEf — Neil Patrick Harris (@ActuallyNPH) October 31, 2014 It should come as no surprise that the Neil Patrick Harris-David Burtka clan were once again the undisputed champs of celebrity family Halloween costumes. This year the actor (and now author) revealed this year's ensemble on Twitter and Instagram, with the caption "Happy Halloween from Gotham City!!" Nph went as a dapper Riddler, while husband Burtka channeled a Jack-Nicholson-era Joker. Their twins dressed as Gotham City's superheroes, with Gideon as Batman and Harper as a very fierce-looking Batgirl—criminals beware! Elaborate group costumes »

- Kat Ward

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Eli Roth Talks Horror Film Obsession | Larry King’s Spooky Halloween

31 October 2014 1:45 PM, PDT | Horror News | See recent Horror News news »

Halloween is alive in Larry’s studio on the Emmy nominated series  “Larry King Now” as he dissects the brain (figuratively that is!) of Eli Roth–the man behind some of Hollywood’s goriest films. Eli dishes about his love for horror and even gives Larry some tips for spooking his boys!

Horror filmmaker Eli Roth talked to Larry King about how “The Wizard of Oz” planted the seed for his future … Continue reading →

Horrornews.net »

- Horrornews.net

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