IMDb > Rose of Washington Square (1939)
Rose of Washington Square
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Rose of Washington Square (1939) More at IMDbPro »


Overview

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6.8/10   323 votes »
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Up 6% in popularity this week. See why on IMDbPro.
Director:
Writers:
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)
John Larkin (based on a story by) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Rose of Washington Square on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
5 May 1939 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Plot:
A singer becomes a star in the Ziegfeld Follies, but her marriage to a con man has a bad effect on her career. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
User Reviews:
You might swear that you've seen this before... See more (14 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Tyrone Power ... Barton Dewitt Clinton

Alice Faye ... Rose Sargent

Al Jolson ... Ted Cotter

William Frawley ... Harry Long

Joyce Compton ... Peggy
Hobart Cavanaugh ... Whitey Boone
Moroni Olsen ... Mayor Buck Russell
E.E. Clive ... Barouche Driver

Louis Prima ... Band Leader
Charles C. Wilson ... Police Lt. Mike Cavanaugh
Hal K. Dawson ... Chump
Paul E. Burns ... Chump (as Paul Burns)
Ben Welden ... Toby
Horace McMahon ... Irving (as Horace MacMahon)
Paul Stanton ... District Attorney
Maurice Cass ... Mr. Mok
Harry Hayden ... Dexter

Charles Lane ... Sam Kress
Adrian Morris ... Jim
John Hamilton ... Judge
Winifred Harris ... Mrs. Russell
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
Carol Adams ... Minor Role (uncredited)
Murray Alper ... Eddie - Candy Butcher (uncredited)
Herbert Ashley ... Stage Doorman (uncredited)
Brooks Benedict ... Man in Box at Wintergarden (uncredited)
Ed Brady ... Cooch Show Spectator (uncredited)
Ralph Brooks ... Man in Audience (uncredited)
Chick Chandler ... Emcee at Theatre (uncredited)
Eddy Chandler ... Cop (uncredited)
Edward Cooper ... Butler (uncredited)
Edgar Dearing ... Lieutenant (uncredited)
Ralph Dunn ... Officer (uncredited)
Paul Ellis ... Frank - Ted's Attendant (uncredited)
Al Ferguson ... Court Officer (uncredited)
James Flavin ... Guard (uncredited)
Bess Flowers ... Dinner Guest (uncredited)
Oscar 'Dutch' Hendrian ... Man in Audience (uncredited)
Lew Hicks ... Bailiff (uncredited)
Paul Irving ... Music Publisher (uncredited)
Claire James ... Well-Wisher (uncredited)
Gladden James ... Court Bailiff (uncredited)
Leonard Kibrick ... Newsboy (uncredited)
Jack Luden ... Attorney (uncredited)
Charles McMurphy ... Music Conductor (uncredited)
Harold Miller ... Man in Front Row (uncredited)
George Mori ... Publisher (uncredited)
James C. Morton ... Speakeasy Bartender (uncredited)
William Newell ... Hotel Clerk (uncredited)
Arthur Rankin ... Newspaper Reporter (uncredited)
Cyril Ring ... Master of Ceremonies at Cast Party (uncredited)
Bert Roach ... Mr. Paunch (uncredited)

Robert Shaw ... Newspaper Reporter (uncredited)
Charles Tannen ... Newspaper Reporter (uncredited)
Stanley Taylor ... Lobbygow (uncredited)
Blue Washington ... Prisoner (uncredited)
Kenny Williams ... Dancer (uncredited)
Irma Wilson ... Miss Lust (uncredited)

Directed by
Gregory Ratoff 
 
Writing credits
Nunnally Johnson (screenplay)

John Larkin (based on a story by) and
Jerry Horwin (based on a story by)

Produced by
Nunnally Johnson .... producer
Darryl F. Zanuck .... producer
 
Original Music by
Gene Rose (uncredited)
 
Cinematography by
Karl Freund 
 
Film Editing by
Louis R. Loeffler 
 
Art Direction by
Richard Day 
Rudolph Sternad 
 
Set Decoration by
Thomas Little 
 
Costume Design by
Royer 
 
Sound Department
Eugene Grossman .... sound
Roger Heman Sr. .... sound
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Sam Benson .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Louis Silvers .... musical director
 
Other crew
Seymour Felix .... choreographer
 

Production CompaniesDistributors

Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
86 min
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)
Certification:
USA:Approved (PCA #5093)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
This film closely resembles the life of entertainer Fanny Brice, and Alice Faye even sings Brice's signature song, "My Man" in the film. According to "Biography: Alice Faye: The Star Next Door" (1996), Brice sued 20th Century Fox for $750,000. The studio benefited from the publicity generated by the lawsuit - the film became the highest grossing musical of 1939 - and eventually settled out of court with Brice for an undisclosed amount. It has also been alleged that Power's character resembles Nicky Arnstein.See more »
Movie Connections:
Referenced in Warm Springs (2005) (TV)See more »
Soundtrack:
I'm Sorry I Made You CrySee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
2 out of 3 people found the following review useful.
You might swear that you've seen this before..., 21 July 2009
Author: planktonrules from Bradenton, Florida

WARNING: This is a politically incorrect film. Deal with it and understand the context or just skip it altogether--I could certainly understand why you might skip it. Just know ahead of time that through much of the film, one of the stars performs in black-face (yikes!!). However, it IS a part of our history and is a pretty good film, so I would hate to see everyone just disregard it completely.

The film begins with Alice Faye working with partner Al Jolson. They are both struggling singers and have hopes of making it big on Broadway. The path for Jolson is pretty smooth, and he's soon discovered and becomes the toast of the town. As for Faye, in the meantime, she falls for a no-good pretty boy (Tyrone Power) and her route to the top is a bit slower and filled with pitfalls.

Both Faye and Jolson sing a huge number of songs. Jolson's act may surprise and offend a lot in the audience, after all his shtick was singing in black-face! But despite his politically incorrect act, he was in top form here--singing many of his all-time great songs that are still pretty enjoyable today. As for Faye, with her rather husky voice, she is a bit of a surprise, as today it's a bit harder to see her appeal. I mean that while she isn't bad at all, she also isn't all that great when she sings--though she was a huge box office star in her day.

You might swear that you've seen this before...especially if you've seen FUNNY GIRL. While many of the details have been changed, the plot of ROSE OF WASHINGTON SQUARE is essentially the story of Fanny Brice and her scum-bag lover, Nicky Arnstein. However, Twentieth-Century Fox decided to do this without the permission or royalties to Ms. Brice--resulting in a lawsuit and subsequent settlement. The most egregious bit of "literary license" is having Faye sing a close variation of Brice's hit song "My Man". While much of this information is on IMDb about the background for the film, I could clearly see the similarities....and differences. While Alice Faye looks and acts nothing like Fanny Brice, Tyrone Power is much closer to Arnstein--though, like in FUNNY GIRL, he's a bit sanitized. In ROSE OF WASHINGTON SQUARE, he's more of a man who unsuccessfully juggles and connives--not an outright crook like the real Arnstein, but more like a lovable schemer who essentially means well. As for the rest of the film, it's a Vaudeville extravaganza--leading to Alice Faye and Al Jolson going to work for Mr. Ziegfeld. Brice, as you may know, was a huge star with Ziegfeld despite (or perhaps because of) her very ethnic singing and "unconventional looks" (a nice way of saying ugly). She sure didn't look or sing like Faye, but otherwise there sure are a lot of similarities--except that in the end, Faye waited for her lover to return from prison, whereas after already serving a stretch in Sing Sing and bound for Leavenworth, Ms. Brice thankfully divorced Arnstein.

Very watchable and enjoyable but also a rather sleazy exploitation of Ms. Brice AND a disturbing case of minstrel-itis!

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