Ninotchka
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Ninotchka (1939) More at IMDbPro »


2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

6 items from 2014


Film Review: ‘Li’l Quinquin’

20 June 2014 1:38 PM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

Perhaps not since Greta Garbo uttered her celebrated first chortle in “Ninotchka” has a film artist’s entrance into comedy been quite as unexpected as that of French director Bruno Dumont. A high priest of cine-miserablism drawn to Bressonian tales of spiritual suffering, Dumont lets loose his inner clown for “Li’l Quinquin,” a four-part TV miniseries that frequently suggests a cross between “True Detective” and Mack Sennett’s Keystone Cops, while remaining every inch a Dumont movie, from its windswept northern French locales to its sometimes discomfiting use of nonprofessional actors. The odd mix of elements makes for an alternately (and sometimes simultaneously) hilarious and unsettling whole, and yet another compelling example of established bigscreen auteurs finding their richest opportunities in longform television. A more challenging sell than either Olivier Assayas’ “Carlos” or Jane Campion’s “Top of the Lake,” Dumont’s pic should nevertheless see many fest bookings »

- Scott Foundas

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Learning From The Masters Of Cinema: Billy Wilder's Ace In The Hole

5 May 2014 2:00 AM, PDT | Twitch | See recent Twitch news »

Released in 1951, Ace in the Hole marked a pivotal moment in the career of its writer-director, Billy Wilder, for a number of different reasons. His scathing attack on the media was Wilder's first film after breaking his long-term writing partnership with Charles Brackett, which over 12 years had garnered two Best Screenplay Oscars (for The Lost Weekend and Sunset Blvd.), three more Oscar nominations and a string of commercial hits. Ace in the Hole also marked Wilder's first credit as producer as well as writer and director. More importantly, it also proved to be his first flop, breaking a string of box office successes dating back to 1939's Ninotchka. However, in the ensuing decades the film has been the subject of much re-assessment and...

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Who Should Play Garbo and Dietrich?

18 April 2014 6:11 PM, PDT | Indiewire Television | See recent Indiewire Television news »

So it looks like indie-minded producer Megan Ellison of Annapurna Pictures, who backed upcoming Cannes entry "Foxcatcher" as well as such Oscar contenders as "The Master," "American Hustle" and "Her," is now developing her first TV series to be sold to the networks.  Set during Hollywood's Golden Age, the drama focuses on Nordic beauties Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich, who were known for their androgynous mystery. “The Swedish Sphinx” and “The Blonde Venus” could be both glamorous and alluring--and get away with wearing pants. Thus, much like one-time roommates Cary Grant and Randolph Scott, rumors swirled surrounded them.  Based at MGM, Greta Garbo ("Grand Hotel," "Ninotchka," "Queen Christina") never starred in a movie with Paramount's reigning diva Dietrich ("Shanghai Express," "Morocco," "Catherine the Great"), and the two so-called studio rivals claimed to have never met. (Back in Europe, they reportedly each enjoyed an affair with elegant aristocrat Mercedes de...

»

- Anne Thompson

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Who Should Play Garbo and Dietrich?

18 April 2014 6:11 PM, PDT | Thompson on Hollywood | See recent Thompson on Hollywood news »

So it looks like indie-minded producer Megan Ellison of Annapurna Pictures, who backed upcoming Cannes entry "Foxcatcher" as well as such Oscar contenders as "The Master," "American Hustle" and "Her," is now developing her first TV series to be sold to the networks.  Set during Hollywood's Golden Age, the drama focuses on Nordic beauties Greta Garbo and Marlene Dietrich, who were known for their androgynous mystery. “The Swedish Sphinx” and “The Blonde Venus” could be both glamorous and alluring--and get away with wearing pants. Thus, much like one-time roommates Cary Grant and Randolph Scott, rumors swirled surrounded them.  Based at MGM, Greta Garbo ("Grand Hotel," "Ninotchka," "Queen Christina") never starred in a movie with Paramount's reigning diva Dietrich ("Shanghai Express," "Morocco," "Catherine the Great"), and the two so-called studio rivals claimed to have never met. (Back in Europe, they reportedly each enjoyed an affair with elegant aristocrat Mercedes de »

- Anne Thompson

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Library of Congress' Packard Campus: Rare Double Screening of Box Office Cataclysm

26 March 2014 6:07 PM, PDT | Alt Film Guide | See recent Alt Film Guide news »

Screwball comedy movies, rare screenings of epic box office disaster: Library of Congress’ Packard Theater in April 2014 (photo: Cary Grant and Irene Dunne in ‘The Awful Truth’) In April 2014, the Library of Congress’ Packard Campus Theater in Culpeper, Virginia, will celebrate Hollywood screwball comedy movies, from the Marx Brothers’ antics to Peter Bogdanovich’s early ’70s homage What’s Up, Doc?, a box office blockbuster starring Barbra Streisand and Ryan O’Neal. Additionally, the Packard Theater will present a couple of rarities, including an epoch-making box office disaster that led to the demise of a major studio. Among Packard’s April 2014 screwball comedies are the following: Leo McCarey’s Duck Soup (Saturday, April 5) — actually more zany, wacky, and totally insane than merely "screwball" — in which Groucho Marx stars as the recently (un)elected dictator of Freedonia, abetted by siblings Harpo Marx and Chico Marx, in addition to Groucho’s perennial foil, »

- Andre Soares

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Gff 2014: ‘The Grand Budapest Hotel’ is perhaps Wes Anderson’s most ambitious film to date, and one of his best

20 February 2014 10:51 AM, PST | SoundOnSight | See recent SoundOnSight news »

The Grand Budapest Hotel

Written and directed by Wes Anderson

USA/UK/Germany, 2014

More than perhaps any other director, the work of Ernst Lubitsch has been the most noticeable influence on Wes Anderson’s style. Though the great German-American writer-director, most prolific in the 1930s and 1940s, was never quite so aesthetically bold in the look of his sets, he too was preoccupied with meticulous staging for comedy within his chosen locales, be they the titular Shop Around the Corner or the Parisian hotel of Ninotchka; The Grand Budapest Hotel is set in a fictional European country, the Republic of Zubrowka, another Lubitsch trait from works like The Merry Widow and The Love Parade, though The Shop Around the Corner happens to be set in the city Anderson’s mountaintop lodging house takes its name from. He garnered the descriptor of ‘the Lubitsch touch’ thanks to the moving sincerity that »

- Josh Slater-Williams

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2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2006

6 items from 2014


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