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Jamaica Inn (1939) Poster

(1939)

Trivia

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Alfred Hitchcock made no cameo appearance in this movie.
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Was reportedly one of Alfred Hitchcock's most unhappy directing jobs. He felt caught between Charles Laughton and Laughton's business partners. Later, he said that he did not so much direct the film as referee it.
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One of the films included in "The Fifty Worst Films of All Time (and how they got that way)" by Harry Medved and Randy Lowell.
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This was the last movie that Alfred Hitchcock made in England before going to Hollywood under contract to David O. Selznick.
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When Charles Laughton was cast in the role of Squire Pengallan, he insisted that Maureen O'Hara be cast in the role of Mary.
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In an interview with François Truffaut, Alfred Hitchcock said about this film, "Although it became a box-office hit, I'm still unhappy over it." It made a profit of $3.7 million.
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In a 1972 interview with Pia Lindström, Alfred Hitchcock said that it took one full morning to get one closeup of Charles Laughton. He also said that "he was a nice man. A charming man. He really was. But oh! He suffered so much, because he felt he couldn't get it out. And we were one whole morning on the one closeup until he got up. And he was crying in the corner. And I went over and patted him on the shoulder".
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This was the first of three Daphne Du Maurier tales that Alfred Hitchcock made into movies. The other two were Rebecca (1940) and The Birds (1963).
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Although Alfred Hitchcock was unhappy with the script and Charles Laughton's performance, still he experimented on this film just as he did on his previous film, The Lady Vanishes (1938). This film has background music only at the beginning and the end. Hitchcock and cinematographer Harry Stradling Jr. gave the film a darker look in order to make it very atmospheric. Stradling later worked with Hitchcock in Mr. & Mrs. Smith (1941) and Suspicion (1941).
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The film takes place in Cornwall in 1819.
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Maureen O'Hara was "Introduced" in the opening titles.
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Alfred Hitchcock was very unhappy with the changes that were made to the script. This was revealed in Charlotte Chandler's book "It's Only a Movie".
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The failure of the original copyright holder to renew the film's copyright resulted in it falling into public domain, meaning that virtually anyone could duplicate and sell a VHS/DVD copy of the film. Therefore, many of the versions of this film available on the market are either severely (and usually badly) edited and/or of extremely poor quality, having been duped from second- or third-generation (or more) copies of the film.
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This was Alfred Hitchcock's last film with John Longden and Clare Greet. Greet played Grammy Tremarney (one of Sir Humphrey's tenants) and Longden played Capt. Johnson; he worked with Hitchcock in five others: Blackmail (1929), The Shame of Mary Boyle (1929), Elstree Calling (1930) (in the short sketch directed by Hitchcock), The Skin Game (1931), The Girl Was Young (1937). Greet worked with Hitchcock in seven other films: Number 13 (1922) (Hitchcock's unfinished film), The Ring (1927), The Manxman (1929), Murder! (1930), Lord Camber's Ladies (1932) (which Hitchcock produced but did not direct), The Man Who Knew Too Much (1934), Sabotage (1936).
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Spoilers 

The trivia item below may give away important plot points.

In the original script written by Sidney Gilliat and Joan Harrison, the villain was a hypocritical preacher. However, the villain was changed to a squire because unsympathetic portrayals of the clergy were forbidden by the Production Code in Hollywood. Charles Laughton was originally cast as the uncle, but he cast himself in the role of villain. Since Laughton was the co-producer and the star of this film, he demanded that Hitchcock give his character, Squire Pengallon, greater screen time. This forced Hitchcock to reveal that Pengallon was a villain in league with the smugglers earlier in the film than he had planned. Laughton's acting was a problem as well for Hitchcock. Laughton played the Squire as having a mincing walk, to the beat of a German waltz which he played in his head, while Hitchcock thought it was out of character.
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