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Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939) Poster

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Howard had only a rudimentary understanding of the violin. During closeups, he kept his hands by his side as violinists bowed and fingered the board. This same trick was performed by Isaac Stern and John Garfield a few years later in Humoresque (1946). (Ingrid Bergman did have some knowledge of piano, and her fingering is correct.) The actual music was dubbed for both: Toscha Seidel for Howard and Norma Drury-Boleslawski for Bergman.
When Selznick fired the cinematographer Harry Stradling Sr. and hired the great Gregg Toland to take over the photography of Selznick's remake of the 1936 Swedish version of "Intermezzo", he asked Toland how it was possible that Bergman looked so beautiful in the original European production and so ghastly in his Hollywood version. Toland replied, "In Sweden they don't make her wear all that makeup." Selznick immediately ordered retakes with the "natural look" which so dazzled the world a year later when he loaned her out to Warner Bros. for their production "Casablanca".
In both her first American film (Intermezzo: A Love Story (1939)) and her last feature film, (Autumn Sonata (1978)), Ingrid Bergman played a concert pianist.
David O. Selznick bribed Leslie Howard into accepting the role of Ashley in Gone with the Wind (1939) by giving him the right to co-produce this film.
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In a published memo, David O. Selznick stated the title "Intermezzo" was not used because he feared the obscurity of the word would confuse audiences.
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First American film of 'Ingrid Bergman'.
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Toscha Seidel dubbed the violin playing of Leslie Howard, while Norma Boleslawksi dubbed the piano playing of both Ingrid Bergman and John Halliday
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on January 29, 1940 with Ingrid Bergman, Douglas Scott and Ann E. Todd reprising their film roles.
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"Lux Radio Theater" broadcast a 60 minute radio adaptation of the movie on June 4, 1945 with Ingrid Bergman again reprising her film role.
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A song, "Intermezzo" was published in 1940 with music by Heinz Provost and lyrics by Robert Hemming, based on the picture's main theme.
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It is interesting to note that almost all the musical content of the film is derivative of Norwegian composers, notably Grieg and Sinding (the composer of "Rustle of Spring."). This is rather curious considering the central characters are Swedish and much of the setting is in Sweden.
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The oldest film to ever receive a network telecast on ABC, thirty-two years after it was made.
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