7.0/10
37
3 user 2 critic

I Stole a Million (1939)

Approved | | Crime, Drama, Film-Noir | 1 August 1939 (USA)
A grizzled cabbie is scammed out of his life savings by a fake finance company. He tries to no avail to get police assistance.

Director:

Writers:

(screenplay), (story)
Reviews
Learn more

People who liked this also liked... 

Dark Command (1940)
Drama | Romance | Western
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 6.9/10 X  

In Kansas, during the Civil War opposing pro-Union and pro-Confederate camps clash and visiting Texan Bob Seton runs afoul of William Cantrell's Raiders.

Director: Raoul Walsh
Stars: Claire Trevor, John Wayne, Walter Pidgeon
Born to Kill (1947)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.3/10 X  

A calculating divorcée risks her chances at wealth and security with a man she doesn't love by getting involved with the hotheaded murderer romancing her foster sister.

Director: Robert Wise
Stars: Claire Trevor, Lawrence Tierney, Walter Slezak
Dead End (1937)
Certificate: Passed Crime | Drama | Film-Noir
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 7.5/10 X  

The lives of a young man and woman, an infamous gangster and a group of street kids converge one day in a volatile New York City slum.

Director: William Wyler
Stars: Sylvia Sidney, Joel McCrea, Humphrey Bogart
Biography | Drama | Sport
    1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 5.4/10 X  

The famed slugger is played by Bendix, who resembles Ruth slightly in looks and not at all in baseball ability. The film traces the "life and times" of Ruth, including his famous "called ... See full summary »

Director: Roy Del Ruth
Stars: William Bendix, Claire Trevor, Charles Bickford
Edit

Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Joe Lourik
...
Laura Benson
...
Paul Carver
...
Nick
...
Patian
...
Herbert
...
Simpson
...
Verne
...
Peterson (as Robert Elliot)
...
Billings (as Joseph Sawyer)
...
Dist. Atty. Wilson

Comic-Con 2017: All Aboard the IMDboat

 | 

July 20 to 23, 2017

Get entertainment news, trailer drops, and photos with IMDb's coverage of 2017 San Diego Comic-Con featuring host and IMDboat captain Kevin Smith. Watch our exclusive celebrity interviews, and tune in to our LIVE show from 3:30 to 5 p.m. PDT on Saturday, July 22.

Browse Our Guide to Comic-Con

Edit

Storyline

A grizzled cabbie is scammed out of his life savings by a fake finance company. He tries to no avail to get police assistance.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

FEARED...HATED...HUNTED.......! See more »


Certificate:

Approved | See all certifications »
Edit

Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

1 August 1939 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Roubei um Milhão  »

Company Credits

Production Co:

 »
Show detailed on  »

Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Mirrophonic Recording)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
See  »
Edit

Did You Know?

Trivia

Actor Arthur Q. Bryan, best known as the voice of "Elmer Fudd" in Warner Bros. cartoons, plays his scene in this movie in his Elmer Fudd voice, even though there is no real reason for his character to talk that way. See more »

Quotes

Laura Benson: There's a nice old lady over there in a millinery shop. You won't even need a gun. Just show her your face, and she'll give you the whole store.
See more »

Frequently Asked Questions

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.

User Reviews

 
Put it back, thief!
14 October 2003 | by (Minffordd, North Wales) – See all my reviews

George Raft was never much of an actor (as he freely admitted), but I fondly recall the ironic desperation in the performance he gave in 'If I Had a Million'. In that movie, Raft played a cheque forger who unexpectedly receives a legitimate cheque for $1,000,000, made out to himself ... then he realises that he can't cash the cheque nor deposit it, because his handiwork is known in every bank in town. Raft's forger nearly goes insane in his frustration. Good performance!

Now here's Raft again, playing a similar role in a film with a similar title: 'I Stole a Million'. Sadly, this movie has a screenplay by Nathanael West: possibly the single most over-rated author in the entire history of American literature. (By coincidence, Nathanael West's brother-in-law was S.J. Perelman: possibly the single most UNDER-rated author in American literature.) This movie is not remotely as good as 'If I Had a Million'.

This movie embodies one of my least favourite film cliches: the one about the 'reluctant thief' who swears he wants to go straight, but first he's got to pull one last job. (Similar to this is the one about the 'weary warrior': the guy who claims to dislike violence, even though he's spent most of his life kicking butt. And now he's got to kick butt one more time...) In 'I Stole a Million', Raft plays a cabdriver who supplements his income with petty crimes. He keeps vowing that one of these days he's going to accumulate enough swag so that he'll be able to go straight. One reason I loathe this 'reluctant thief' plotline is because it insults the audience's intelligence. The main reason why habitual thieves are habitual thieves isn't the money at all: they get a powerful thrill (very nearly like an orgasm) from their criminal behaviour, and they just won't give it up. But here we're expected to believe that Raft would go straight if he could just pull one big job.

Well, he gets that chance in this movie. Will he get away with the million bucks? And if he does, will he really go straight? Who cares? This movie bears no resemblance to reality. The few pleasures on offer in 'I Stole a Million' are supplied by the supporting cast. Dick Foran, the sour-faced Victor Jory, the even sourer-faced Al Hill and the very under-rated Joe Sawyer are all fine here, despite Frank Tuttle's usual lacklustre direction. Hobart Cavanaugh was a character actor who usually blended into the woodwork, but he's splendid here as a mousy little accountant. Watch for veteran stuntman Dave Sharpe as an undersized cab driver. As for leading lady Claire Trevor ... erm, no comment.

George Raft came from Hell's Kitchen in New York City, and he made no bones about the fact that (in real life) he had an extensive criminal background. (Raft and gangster Bugsy Siegel were pals before either was famous.) Raft was extremely believable as a crook in films in which he had good direction, such as 'Scarface', 'You and Me' and 'Quick Millions'. In 'I Stole a Million', Raft gets no direction at all ... and he's utterly unbelievable, even though he's playing a role quite similar to his own early life. I'll rate 'I Stole a Million' one point out of 10.


8 of 18 people found this review helpful.  Was this review helpful to you?

Contribute to This Page

Create a character page for:
?