Gunga Din
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Gunga Din (1939) More at IMDbPro »


2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2017


The Lost City of Z

11 July 2017 11:12 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

They don’t make ’em like this any more, and the original TV spots for James Gray’s accurate retelling of history almost didn’t know how to sell it. Charlie Hunnam spends his life trying to solve a riddle of the Peruvian rainforest, in between fighting in WW1 and dealing with class prejudice. Yup, one could say the picture was filmed in a ‘classic’ style . . . can a show like that find an audience these days?

The Lost City of Z

Blu-ray

Broadgreen / Amazon Studios

2016 / Color / 2:39 widescreen / 141 min. / Street Date July 11, 2017 / 34.99

Starring: Charlie Hunnam, Robert Pattinson, Sienna Miller, Tom Holland, Edward Ashley, Angus Macfadyen, Ian McDiarmid, Clive Francis, Murray Melvin.

Cinematography: Darious Khondji

Film Editor:John Axelrad, Lee Haugen

Original Music: Christopher Spelman

From the book by David Grann

Produced by Dede Gardner, James Gray, Anthony Katagas, Jeremy Kleiner

Written for the Screen and Directed by James Gray

More »

- Glenn Erickson

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Hell and High Water

27 June 2017 9:02 AM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

Samuel Fuller sure knows how to turn up the geopolitical tension, especially in a rip-roaring provocative atom threat adventure, that might have caused problems if anybody cared what movies said back when the Cold War was hot. Richard Widmark skippers a leaky sub to the arctic and discovers that the Chinese communists are going to start WW3 — and blame it on Uncle Sam. It’s an insane comic-book adventure about very serious issues — and we love it.

Hell and High Water

Blu-ray

Twilight Time

1954 / Color / 2:55 widescreen / 103 min. / Street Date June 13, 2017 / Available from the Twilight Time Movies Store 29.95

Starring: Richard Widmark, Bella Darvi, Victor Francen, Richard Loo, Cameron Mitchell, Gene Evans, David Wayne.

Cinematography: Joseph MacDonald

Art Direction: Leland Fuller, Lyle R. Wheeler

Film Editor: James B. Clark

Original Music: Alfred Newman

Written by Samuel Fuller, Jesse L. Lasky Jr. story by David Hempstead

Produced by Raymond A. Klune

Directed »

- Glenn Erickson

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Why Rian Johnson is Great for Star Wars

24 May 2017 8:54 AM, PDT | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

For some, Rian Johnson is the director of the acclaimed hit Looper, which proved he was ready for the big league budget of Star Wars directing. But for others, Rian Johnson is one of the keepers of classic cinema, both in taste and style. Like Lucas before him, Johnson is an old school filmmaker working in a contemporary blockbuster setting. Rian Johnson is a perfect fit for Star Wars, and I’ll detail why in great, painful lengths. Rian Johnson is exactly what Star Wars needs right now.

               On October 30th, 2012 Disney announced they were acquiring Lucasfilm for $4.05 billion and that there would be new Star Wars films every two to three years (that’s since changed). Just barely a month before, Rian Johnson’s film Looper was released wide in September to wide critical acclaim and instantly embraced by fans as a modern sci-fi classic. The first question in »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Collin Llewellyn)

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40,000 Horsemen

2 May 2017 10:00 PM, PDT | Trailers from Hell | See recent Trailers from Hell news »

This 1940 Australian war film about the Light Horse Cavalry was directed by Charles Chauvel, the nephew of much-decorated Sir Harry Chauvel and the commander of that particular cavalry. In a nod to Gunga Din, the film features a trio of rowdy soldiers played by Grant Taylor, Joe Valli and Chips Rafferty. Of the three, only Rafferty broke through in the American market, with roles in Mutiny on the BountyThe Sundowners and even TV’s The Monkees.

»

- TFH Team

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Film Review: ‘Five Came Back’

1 April 2017 2:30 AM, PDT | Variety - Film News | See recent Variety - Film News news »

World War II taught the world to be distrustful of propaganda, as the public came to realize just how effectively cinema could be used to spread anti-Semitism and a lock-step, sieg-heil conformity to demagogues. And yet, among the many insights of Mark Harris’ richly researched book “Five Came Back” — which fleshed out an oft-overlooked chapter of Hollywood history while shading a far more over-scrutinized one in the vast military history canon — was director William Wyler’s view that “all film is propaganda.” Like a loaded weapon, the power and world-changing potential of a camera is all in who’s holding it, and where that person chooses to point it.

Now, Harris’ terrific book has inspired a glossy, if somewhat snooze-inducing Netflix miniseries, “Five Came Back,” directed by Laurent Bouzereau. Simultaneously released in New York and Los Angeles theaters for an Oscar-qualifying run (offering fodder for those awards prognosticators looking for »

- Peter Debruge

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The Ottoman Lieutenant – Review

9 March 2017 11:33 PM, PST | WeAreMovieGeeks.com | See recent WeAreMovieGeeks.com news »

 

As giant apes and mutant loners battle it out at the box office, the multiplex can still spare a screen or two for a love story. Okay, albeit a love story set during a time of violent conflict. Yes, it’s a romance in the trenches, a war-time story of love. But which war (unfortunately we’ve got too many to choose from). World War II was the backdrop for two big flicks last year, Allied and Hacksaw Ridge (mainly in the first half before the near constant carnage). No, this new film goes back a tad further, to that “war to end all wars” World War I. We’ve got to go back a couple of years for that, with 2014’s Testament Of Youth and 2015’s Sunset Song. And while they focused on the great battles on European soil, this new film explores a much warmer climate, in the arid desert lands of Turkey. »

- Jim Batts

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Rotterdam 2017 Review: Sexy Durga, One Terrifying Night In Darkest India

27 January 2017 12:00 PM, PST | Screen Anarchy | See recent Screen Anarchy news »

Man is a dangerous beast. Long ago, before the time of cinema, before the time of television, and certainly before the time of the Internet, the Indian subcontinent was a land mostly known as a fruitful place for the nightmares of western man to bloom. Tales about darkest India and its immense jungles filled with man-eating beasts spread around the world thanks to authors like Rudyard Kipling whose The Jungle Book and Gunga Din served as many people's only introduction to this mysterious land for many decades. These books painted a picture of India as a land of noble savages, often serving as slaves for white masters, or in the case of Gunga Din, murderous Kali worshipers. In the '80s, long after India had been...

[Read the whole post on screenanarchy.com...] »

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Is 1939 the Greatest Year Ever for Films?

22 January 2017 7:02 PM, PST | Cinelinx | See recent Cinelinx news »

The film industry goes back to the beginning of the 20th century, and most experts still maintain that 1939 is the greatest single year in movie history. At no other point in the long chronicle of the film industry has Hollywood had such an ability to draw in and hold and audiences. Cinelinx looks at 1939. 

In 1939, Americans bought an incrediblel 80 million movie tickets per week. There were 365 films released by the major studios in the United States during 1939. That’s an average of one film each a day.  If you went to the theater every day, you’d never have to see the same movie twice. And the best part is that most of them were good.

The American Film Institute, along with such critics as Pauline Kael, Siskle & Ebert, Leonard Maltin and others have dubbed 1939 as the cinema's best single year ever. Looking back, its hard to argue with that opinion. »

- feeds@cinelinx.com (Rob Young)

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2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

8 items from 2017


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