IMDb > Gunga Din (1939)
Gunga Din
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Gunga Din (1939) More at IMDbPro »

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Gunga Din -- Trailer for this historical drama

Overview

User Rating:
7.6/10   7,430 votes »
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Director:
Writers:
Joel Sayre (screen play) &
Fred Guiol (screen play) ...
(more)
Contact:
View company contact information for Gunga Din on IMDbPro.
Release Date:
17 February 1939 (USA) See more »
Genre:
Tagline:
Barbaric Splendor - Gasping Magnitude - Adventure ! See more »
Plot:
In 19th century India, three British soldiers and a native waterbearer must stop a secret mass revival of the murderous Thuggee cult before it can rampage across the land. Full summary » | Add synopsis »
Plot Keywords:
Awards:
Nominated for Oscar. Another 1 win See more »
NewsDesk:
(45 articles)
The Definitive Romantic Comedies: 10-1
 (From SoundOnSight. 9 February 2014, 9:05 PM, PST)

Why are the Oscars embracing 'Oz' but not 'Gone With the Wind'?
 (From EW.com - PopWatch. 29 January 2014, 7:40 AM, PST)

Joan Fontaine obituary
 (From The Guardian - Film News. 16 December 2013, 9:16 AM, PST)

User Reviews:
I'm appalled at the lack of movie history (and history in general) knowledge shown by some users of this board!! See more (91 total) »

Cast

  (in credits order) (verified as complete)

Cary Grant ... Cutter

Victor McLaglen ... MacChesney

Douglas Fairbanks Jr. ... Ballantine

Sam Jaffe ... Gunga Din
Eduardo Ciannelli ... Guru

Joan Fontaine ... Emmy
Montagu Love ... Colonel Weed
Robert Coote ... Higginbotham
Abner Biberman ... Chota
Lumsden Hare ... Major Mitchell
rest of cast listed alphabetically:
John Alban ... (uncredited)
Charles Bennett ... Telegraph Operator (uncredited)
Joe De La Cruz ... (uncredited)
George Du Count ... Pandu Lal (uncredited)
Ann Evers ... Girl at Party (uncredited)

Richard Farnsworth ... Bit Part (uncredited)
Olin Francis ... Fulad (uncredited)
Bryant Fryer ... Scottish Sergeant (uncredited)
Sam Harris ... (uncredited)
Jamiel Hasson ... Thug Chieftain (uncredited)

Cecil Kellaway ... Mr. Stebbins (uncredited)
Frank Leyva ... Merchant (uncredited)
Audrey Manners ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
Joe McGuinn ... (uncredited)
Fay McKenzie ... Girl at Party (uncredited)
Lal Chand Mehra ... Jadoo (uncredited)
Thom Metzetti ... (uncredited)
Art Mix ... (uncredited)
Clive Morgan ... Lancer Captain (uncredited)
Satini Pualoa ... (uncredited)
George Regas ... Thug Chieftain (uncredited)
Allen Schute ... (uncredited)
Reginald Sheffield ... Rudyard Kipling - Journalist (uncredited)
Paul Singh ... (uncredited)
Leslie Sketchley ... Corporal (uncredited)
Tom Tamarez ... (uncredited)
Carlie Taylor ... (uncredited)
Roland Varno ... Lt. Markham (uncredited)
Bruce Wyndham ... (uncredited)
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Directed by
George Stevens 
 
Writing credits
Joel Sayre (screen play) &
Fred Guiol (screen play)

Ben Hecht (story) &
Charles MacArthur (story)

Rudyard Kipling (poem "Gunga Din")

Lester Cohen  contributing writer (uncredited)
John Colton  contributing writer (uncredited)
William Faulkner  contributing writer (uncredited)
Vincent Lawrence  contributing writer (uncredited)
Dudley Nichols  contributing writer (uncredited)
Anthony Veiller  contributing writer (uncredited)

Produced by
George Stevens .... producer
 
Original Music by
Alfred Newman 
 
Cinematography by
Joseph H. August (photographed by) (as Joseph H.August)
 
Film Editing by
Henry Berman (edited by)
John Lockert (edited by)
John Sturges (uncredited)
 
Art Direction by
Van Nest Polglase 
 
Set Decoration by
Darrell Silvera (set decorations)
 
Costume Design by
Edward Stevenson (gowns)
 
Makeup Department
James R. Barker .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Dan Berns .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Irving Berns .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Mel Berns .... makeup department head (uncredited)
Layne Britton .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Russell Drake .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Charles Gemora .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Abe Haberman .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Joe Hadley .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Walter Hermann .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Dick Johnson .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Ben Libizer .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Harry Pringle .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Louis Saintly .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Al Senator .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Howard Smit .... makeup artist (uncredited)
Armand Triller .... makeup artist (uncredited)
William Woods .... makeup artist (uncredited)
 
Production Management
Pandro S. Berman .... in charge of production
 
Second Unit Director or Assistant Director
Edward Killy .... assistant director
Dewey Starkey .... assistant director
Robert Parrish .... assistant director (uncredited)
 
Art Department
Perry Ferguson .... associate art director
Nathan Barragar .... props (uncredited)
Claude E. Carpenter .... set dresser (uncredited)
Thomas Grady .... props (uncredited)
Maxwell O. Henry .... props (uncredited)
James Lane .... props (uncredited)
Kenneth J. Marstella .... props (uncredited)
Gene Rossi .... props (uncredited)
 
Sound Department
James G. Stewart .... recordist (as James Stewart)
John E. Tribby .... recordist
George C. Emick .... sound (uncredited)
John C. Grubb .... sound (uncredited)
S.G. Haughton .... sound (uncredited)
Aubrey C. Lind .... sound (uncredited)
Jack Mark .... sound (uncredited)
Gordon McLean .... sound (uncredited)
Eric Meisel .... sound (uncredited)
Arthur C. Robbins .... sound (uncredited)
Fred Rodgers .... sound (uncredited)
Cecil Shephard .... sound (uncredited)
Jean L. Speak .... boom operator (uncredited)
Kenneth C. Wesson .... sound (uncredited)
 
Special Effects by
Vernon L. Walker .... special effects (as Vernon L.Walker)
Russell A. Cully .... special effects (uncredited)
 
Visual Effects by
P. Brook .... photographic effects (uncredited)
William Collins .... assistant camera: camera effects (uncredited)
Horace L. Hulburd .... photographic effects (uncredited)
Mario Larrinaga .... camera effects artist (uncredited)
Roger Shearman .... photographic effects (uncredited)
Clifford Stine .... second camera: camera effects (uncredited)
G. Swartz .... photographic effects (uncredited)
M. Zamora .... photographic effects (uncredited)
 
Stunts
Richard Farnsworth .... stunts (uncredited)
David Sharpe .... stunts (uncredited)
Barlow Simpson .... stunts (uncredited)
Tom Steele .... stunts (uncredited)
 
Camera and Electrical Department
Joseph A. August Jr. .... second camera operator (uncredited)
H. Barrett .... grip (uncredited)
Pete Bernard .... grip (uncredited)
H.J. Brandon .... grip (uncredited)
Charles Burke .... camera operator (uncredited)
Tom Clement .... grip (uncredited)
William H. Clothier .... camera operator (uncredited)
T. Connelly .... grip (uncredited)
Charles Davis .... camera operator (uncredited)
Thomas East .... best boy (uncredited)
Earl Gilpin .... grip (uncredited)
Alexander Kahle .... still photographer (uncredited)
George Marquenie .... gaffer (uncredited)
C. Noren .... grip (uncredited)
W. Norton .... grip (uncredited)
Eddie Pyle .... second camera operator (uncredited)
William Record .... grip (uncredited)
F. Reed .... grip (uncredited)
Cliff Shirpser .... assistant camera (uncredited)
Charles Straumer .... second camera operator (uncredited)
Leon Turen .... camera operator (uncredited)
William Whitaker .... camera operator (uncredited)
Joe Zaslove .... camera operator (uncredited)
 
Costume and Wardrobe Department
Ray Camp .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Harold Clandenning .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Bill Durant .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Eugene Joseff .... costume jeweller (uncredited)
Harry Lawrence .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Bill Rabb .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Fred Starns .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Wesley Trist .... wardrobe (uncredited)
Pat Williams .... wardrobe (uncredited)
 
Music Department
Robert Russell Bennett .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Edward B. Powell .... orchestrator (uncredited)
Conrad Salinger .... orchestrator (uncredited)
 
Other crew
William Briers .... technical advisor (as Sergeant Major William Briers)
Robert Erskine Holland .... technical advisor (as Sir Robert Erskine Holland)
Clive Morgan .... technical advisor (as Captain Clive Morgan)
Art Bruggerman .... stand-in (uncredited)
Phoebe Campbell .... stand-in (uncredited)
Gordon B. Clarke .... stand-in: Douglas Fairbanks Jr. (uncredited)
Hilda Grenier .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Sam Harris .... technical advisor (uncredited)
Mal Merrihugh .... stand-in (uncredited)
Barlow Simpson .... elephant trainer (uncredited)
 
Crew verified as complete


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Additional Details

Also Known As:
Runtime:
117 min | 96 min (reissue)
Country:
Language:
Aspect Ratio:
1.37 : 1 See more »
Sound Mix:
Mono (RCA Victor System)
Certification:
Argentina:13 | Finland:K-16 | Netherlands:14 (original rating) (1939) | Norway:16 | Portugal:M/12 | UK:U (passed with cuts) | USA:Approved (PCA #4452) | USA:TV-PG (TV rating)

Did You Know?

Trivia:
Was second only to Gone with the Wind (1939) as the biggest money-maker of 1939.See more »
Goofs:
Revealing mistakes: In the end, when they're taking Gunga Din's body away, Colonel Weed does the salute the American way (palm down). The British salute with the palm up (Sam Jeffe demonstrates it perfectly a few seconds later).See more »
Quotes:
Guru:You seem to think warfare an English invention. Have you never heard of Chandragupta Maurya? He slaughtered all the armies left in India by Alexander the Great. India was a mighty nation then while Englishmen still dwelt in caves and painted themselves blue.See more »
Movie Connections:
Featured in Look Back in Anger (1959)See more »
Soundtrack:
Blue Bonnets Over the BorderSee more »

FAQ

This FAQ is empty. Add the first question.
199 out of 233 people found the following review useful.
I'm appalled at the lack of movie history (and history in general) knowledge shown by some users of this board!!, 26 December 2003
Author: prudhocj from Olympic Peninsula

Although I'm usually only mildly appalled reading through user comments on movies on imdb.com some of the comments made here about this classic movie exhibit a true nadir of ignorance of history in general and movies in particular. E.g.;

1 - I'm particularly struck by the comment - "This movie is shot on location in California because shooting in India would have been too expensive." Prior to the 1950's Hollywood movies were rarely (and I mean rarely) shot on the original location sites. The problem was not expense (although the moguls certainly were pinching the pennies), the problem was transportation! Transporting a movie production company halfway around the world would have been nearly impossible to accomplish (let alone how long it would have taken and then they would have been shooting under impossible conditions in India anyway) not to mention that WWII was on the verge of breaking out! The biggest movie of that year was shot on a set in Culver City, CA where they could easily manipulate the filming. Even if they had sent the production company to Atlanta they couldn't very well burn down Atlanta for authenticity' sake now could they? They would have had to have built a set(s) in Atlanta - why would they go all the way across the country to do that when they could do it Culver City?

2 - Several people lament that Gunga Din was not shot in color. A little movie history context here - first of all, the first full length feature film shot in color had only been done 4 years earlier, secondly three-strip technicolor was outrageously expensive in 1939 (only one other movie was shot that year in technicolor and it didn't start making back its costs until the late 1960's) and the few features shot prior to that year in color had failed miserably to make back their production costs. And finally, the studios had no faith in color (just as they had resisted "talkies" a decade earlier) - they were in business to make money, not experiment with an innovation that had not yet been accepted and proven to bring in a bigger audience. Also, there was a comment about the graininess of the B&W cinematography of GD - that's because 99% of the present day viewers are seeing multi-generation copies that have been played to death! Get a fresh, first generation copy to see the B&W shading in its true brightness, focus and clarity and that objection will go away. BTW - the colorized version of GD is abysmal - faded coloring effects and indistinct edges make it look like a sloppy water color painting!

3 - Labelling anything from the past as not being PC only shows the lack of historical context knowledge so rampant in the present day. First of all this movie was loosely based on a poem that was already 47 years old when this movie was released. If you change the politics to match the present day conception of "correctness" then you really don't have the original concept do you? Not to mention that America was a far different place racially (and socially) in 1939. There are movies being released in 2003 that will catch hell 50 years from now for their "politics" - just chalk it up to the ignorance of future generations to not recognize what the history of the times were. I do like the analysis by one writer though that far from being a reactionary screed the movie went further than the poem in emphasizing that Gunga Din was far better off in his position than he would have been otherwise. After all, he was an "untouchable", a social postion that was abused, exploited and terrorized by their fellow Indians for thousands of years. Whatever one might think of his treatment by the British it was a high step up from what he would have endured out in his own society! Which brings me to.........

4 - ..........the ridiculously misguided (and just plain wrong) observations about the Thuggees of India being "freedom fighters", this couldn't be more wrong. Several of the commentators really need to read up on Indian history - the Thuggees had been ritualistic murderers and thieves for thousands of years in India before the British ever arrived! If they had any support from various rulers of parts of India it was because those rulers either feared for their own positions or they could get the Thuggees to do their dirty work for them - for a high price of course. The Thuggees reputation for brutality, unabated crimes of the worst kind and general, overall lack of human attributes make most other singlemindedly evil groups throughout history (even in the present day) look like amateurs! The reason they fought the British so vociferously was that the British recognized this and fought to suppress them - I seriously doubt that many Indians lamented that suppression. And to the person who equated the Thuggees with French Resistance fighters killing "collaborators" - where did you get such a preposterous idea? Do you know anything at all about the history of the Indian sub-continent?

Let me also point out here that it is the British who are the infidels not the "natives", just another example of how mixed up one can be about who is who and understanding what history and meaning really are.

I especially love the reviewers who spend their time comparing this to another movie that they like better in order to dis this one - so they review the other movie instead. Why bother, movies stand on their own, you either like them or you don't, go watch the other one you like instead.

5 - Now, everyone is entitled to their opinion, which I certainly support, as to whether this is a "good" or a "bad" movie (opinions are like.......well, you know) but fergawdsakes base that opinion on an informed knowledge of the times, the historical context of the work and the realization that movies are just movies - they aren't "real" and they certainly make up whatever "truth" and "facts" they see fit!

My opinion? This is one of the great "entertainment" movies ever made - the reason to go to the movies I thought? It has everything - a good script, a good story, epic sweep, fantastic acting, inter-character chemistry, charisma, pacing and coherency. How many movies can you say that about? And kudos to those who see this movie for what it is, not what they want it to be!

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why did they use the tune to 'Auld Lang Syne'? Krista2882
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