5.5/10
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Exile Express (1939)

Spies will not stop at murder in their attempts to wrest a secret formula for a deadly poison away from American scientists.

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Writers:

(screenplay), (screenplay)
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Cast

Cast overview, first billed only:
...
Nadine Nikolas
...
Steve Reynolds
...
Paul Brandt
...
Gus
...
Hanley
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Tony Kassan
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David
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Caretaker
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Victor
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Dr. Hite
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Purnell
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Kaishevshy (as Feodor Chaliapin)
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Justice of the Peace Henry P. Smith
...
Serge
Don Brodie ...
Mullins
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Storyline

Spies will not stop at murder in their attempts to wrest a secret formula for a deadly poison away from American scientists.

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Plot Keywords:

spy | scientist | See All (2) »

Taglines:

All She Wanted Was a Country. All She Got Was Trouble

Genres:

Drama

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Details

Country:

Language:

Release Date:

27 May 1939 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

A Caminho do Exílio  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

(Western Electric Sound System)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

The earliest documented telecast of this film occurred Monday 27 November 1944 on New York City's pioneer television station WNBT (Channel 1). In Baltimore it first aired Wednesday 3 March 1948 on WMAR (Channel 2), in Detroit Wednesday 17 November 1948 on WXYZ (Channel 7), in Fort Worth Saturday 1 January 1949 on WBAP (Channel 5), in Salt Lake City Thursday 8 December 1949 on KSL (Channel 5), and in Los Angeles Wednesday 15 December 1949 on KTLA (Channel 5). See more »

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User Reviews

 
I Like Anna Sten, But This Film Is a Mess!
25 June 2008 | by See all my reviews

Filmed at Universal Studios using whatever studio contract photographers happened to be available on the day, this movie is a mess, thanks largely to the producer's decision to jazz up the script with ill-advised slapstick.

Admittedly the original Mayer scenario was no great shakes. The plot was a Hollywood stand-by that was even being used at that very moment by M-G-M's It's a Wonderful World. In the Metro movie, however, the comedy was most adroitly integrated into the murder-and-suspense plot. Here it is not. Worse still, the slapstick is both way overplayed and incompetently directed. Only George Chandler manages to make something of his scenes. Girardot is a bore (admittedly his material is not only mighty thin but exhaustively spun out), while Catlett and Prouty adopt a similar ruse by shouting and screaming to absolutely no effect whatever—except to bore audiences silly. A pity, because the murder plot seemed promising enough before it suddenly switched to lowbrow slanging matches between Prouty and Catlett, and the equivalent of pie-in-the-face, courtesy of Vince Barnett.

By the time Girardot makes his belated entrance, the audience is well and truly fed up with the movie. At this stage, not even Clark Gable could rescue the script, but Alan Marshal makes little effort other than to keep smiling blithely away, while Miss Sten is content to pose for soft, gossamer close-up after soft, gossamer close-up. Unfortunately, that's not enough. The acting honors, such as they are, are easily stolen by Leonid Kinsky of all people!


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