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The Human Monster (1939)
"The Dark Eyes of London" (original title)

 -  Crime | Horror | Mystery  -  24 March 1940 (USA)
5.8
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Ratings: 5.8/10 from 630 users  
Reviews: 28 user | 16 critic

Insurance agent-physician collects on policies of men murdered by a disfigured resident of the home for the blind where he acts as doctor-on-call.

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(novel), (screenplay), 3 more credits »
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Title: The Human Monster (1939)

The Human Monster (1939) on IMDb 5.8/10

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Cast

Complete credited cast:
...
Dr. Feodor Orloff / Prof. John Dearborn
Hugh Williams ...
Det. Insp. Larry Holt
Greta Gynt ...
Diana Stuart
Edmon Ryan ...
Lieutenant Patrick O'Reilly
Wilfred Walter ...
Jake
Alexander Field ...
Fred Grogan
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Storyline

A series of strange deaths takes place in London. All are accidents but the victims are single men with no family and they all have a link to a life insurance company run by the mysterious Dr. Orloff. Written by Col Needham <col@imdb.com>

Plot Summary | Add Synopsis

Taglines:

Based on "The Dark Eyes Of London" By Edgar Wallace [Poster under title of The Human Monster]

Genres:

Crime | Horror | Mystery | Drama

Certificate:

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Details

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Release Date:

24 March 1940 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

The Human Monster  »

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

Sound Mix:

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Holt's statement "As the walrus said to the carpenter, the time has come..." is a reference to the poem, 'The Walrus and the Carpenter', from Lewis Carroll's 'Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There'. See more »

Quotes

Dr. Feodor Orloff: You have been very foolish, Lou. You are blind, and you cannot speak. But you can hear - and that will never do!
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Connections

Featured in 100 Years of Horror: Bela Lugosi (1996) See more »

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User Reviews

 
Far from brilliant, but very high on the "creepy factor"
3 April 2008 | by (Bradenton, Florida) – See all my reviews

Bela Lugosi made a lot of schlocky films during his career. While DARK EYES OF London is definitely a low budget film, thanks to decent writing and a very creepy style it manages to entertain even after almost 70 years.

Bela plays a totally amoral criminal who runs an insurance company. He insures people and makes himself the beneficiary after making these people loans. But instead of waiting to collect the money, he drowns them and throws their body in the Thames. While an interesting scheme, he oddly does it repeatedly--naturally arousing the suspicions of the police.

In addition to being an insurance man, Lugosi also is a benefactor to a home for indigent blind men. However, this act of kindness is a front, as this home is where Bela commits his murders with the help of a truly horrifying looking blind assistant. Near the very end, you actually get to see him kill one of his innocent victims and toss him in the river in a very graphic way--hence deservedly earning its special horror rating in the UK.

The film earns some points for an unusual plot and its graphic scenes--it really is a pretty scary film for 1940. However, there are a few lulls, some overacting by the idiot playing the cop from Chicago and the irrationality of Lugosi committing so many murders yet hoping to get away with it when he's the only rational suspect. By the way, speaking of the Chicago cop, do all Brits see us Americans as THAT brash and annoying?! I sure hope not! You also wonder why they even bothered including this character, as he was rather distracting and unnecessary.


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