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The Bill of Rights (1939)

Approved | | Short, Drama, History | 19 August 1939 (USA)
This short subject is a lavish costumed color production which dramatizes the birth of the American Bill of Rights. It depicts leading political figures of the American Revolution and the ... See full summary »

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(original screenplay)
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Cast

Complete credited cast:
Ted Osborne ...
...
Royal Governor Dunmore (as Moroni Olson)
Leonard Mudie ...
Moreland
...
...
Raymond Brown
...
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Storyline

This short subject is a lavish costumed color production which dramatizes the birth of the American Bill of Rights. It depicts leading political figures of the American Revolution and the despotic British colonial rule which led to the creation of the Bill of Rights. Written by Thomas McWilliams <tgm@netcom.com>

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Genres:

Short | Drama | History

Certificate:

Approved
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Details

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Release Date:

19 August 1939 (USA)  »

Also Known As:

Technicolor Classics (1938-1939 season) #7: The Bill of Rights  »

Company Credits

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Technical Specs

Runtime:

| (TCM print)

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Color:

(Technicolor)

Aspect Ratio:

1.37 : 1
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Did You Know?

Trivia

Vitaphone production reels #9300-9301. See more »

Connections

Edited from Give Me Liberty (1936) See more »

Soundtracks

America
Written by Samuel Francis Smith (music) and Henry Carey (lyrics attributed)
Performed by studio orchestra
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User Reviews

WB's publicity department never missed an opportunity.

The world premiere (most shorts never had one) of this Vitaphone Technicolor featurette was held on August 31, 1939 at The National Conference of Christians and Jews at Williams College, Williamstown, Mass.

Warner's also arranged for a national radio broadcast of the events over the NBC Blue network, with many of the company's stars (including some big-names who weren't in this short) participating via a hook-up to the Los Angeles NBC studio.

Actually, considering the events going on in Europe at the time, the National Conference of Christians and Jews was exactly the right place to premiere this short. Those with short and/or selective memories and revisionist inclinations may disagree. That's okay. The Bill of Rights gives them that privilege.


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